Women at the Wheel

A Century of Buying, Driving, and Fixing Cars

Author: Katherine J. Parkin

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812249534

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 2097

Women at the Wheel shows how stereotypes of women as uninterested in automobiles and, more perniciously, as poor drivers, has little basis in historical reality. However, Katherine J. Parkin argues that in American culture women are still considered imposters when they are at the wheel.
Posted in History

Food Is Love

Advertising and Gender Roles in Modern America

Author: Katherine J. Parkin

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204077

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7105

Modern advertising has changed dramatically since the early twentieth century, but when it comes to food, Katherine Parkin writes, the message has remained consistent. Advertisers have historically promoted food in distinctly gendered terms, returning repeatedly to themes that associated shopping and cooking with women. Foremost among them was that, regardless of the actual work involved, women should serve food to demonstrate love for their families. In identifying shopping and cooking as an expression of love, ads helped to both establish and reinforce the belief that kitchen work was women's work, even as women's participation in the labor force dramatically increased. Alternately flattering her skills as a homemaker and preying on her insecurities, advertisers suggested that using their products would give a woman irresistible sexual allure, a happy marriage, and healthy children. Ads also promised that by buying and making the right foods, a woman could help her family achieve social status, maintain its racial or ethnic identity, and assimilate into the American mainstream. Advertisers clung tenaciously to this paradigm throughout great upheavals in the patterns of American work, diet, and gender roles. To discover why, Food Is Love draws on thousands of ads that appeared in the most popular magazines of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, including the Ladies' Home Journal, Good Housekeeping, Ebony, and the Saturday Evening Post. The book also cites the records of one of the nation's preeminent advertising firms, as well as the motivational research advertisers utilized to reach their customers.
Posted in History

Traffic

Why We Drive the Way We Do (and what it Says about Us)

Author: Tom Vanderbilt

Publisher: Vintage Books USA

ISBN: 0307277194

Category: Social Science

Page: 402

View: 9195

A best-selling social study analyzes the complex factors that dictate how traffic works, why we drive the way we do, and what our driving reveals about us, discussing the unintended consequences of attempts to engineer safety, why plans to protect pedestrians can lead to more accidents, and more. Reprint.
Posted in Social Science

The Women's Wheel of Life

Thirteen Archetypes of Woman at Her Fullest Power

Author: Elizabeth Davis,Carol Leonard

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780615394688

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 244

View: 4218

Maiden, Mother, or Crone-where does a woman in her forties fit in? Women who have turned to feminist spirituality for appreciation of women's ways of knowing have struggled with the confining concept of the Triple Goddess. Though no longer raising children, a woman may not yet be ready to be a "wise old woman." The Women's Wheel of Life offers a new archetype for this woman-the Matriarch. The Matriarch is the Queen of the Harvest-reaping the rewards of sustained work and effort, at the height of her sexual and professional power. Elegantly self-possessed, fueled by an intensity and direction, she is poised to rekindle the passions, dreams and spiritual pursuits of youth. She represents the challenge facing midlife women today-how to reap the harvest of one's work and make time for new creative and personal explorations. The Matriarch is but one of thirteen empowering archetypes presented in this book. From Daughter to Blood Sister, Mother to Amazon, Sorceress to Crone, this groundbreaking work reveals the grand pattern of women's lives, rich and complex, beautiful and mysterious.
Posted in Body, Mind & Spirit

The Automobile and American Life, 2d ed.

Author: John Heitmann

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 147666935X

Category: Transportation

Page: 291

View: 6445

Reviews of the first edition: "The prose is almost flawless, and the writing never feels beleaguered...it is almost like the author enjoyed every topic and every page. Highly recommended. All collections"—Choice "A great starting point for any student of American automotive history and a worthwhile addition to a collector's bookshelf"—Autoweek "Fun, informative, and close to a prewar bull's eye!"—Prewar Auto Notes "Very worthwhile reading"—Hemmings Classic Car "This is an immensely useful work, especially for those of us who want an entertaining and provocative text for our courses...provide teachers with a great opportunity to expand on the text in class...a valuable asset to any teacher who hopes to bring the automobile and automobility into the classroom"—Technology and Culture "Highly recommended"—Enterprise & Society "A deeply thought provoking study"—www.route66infocenter.com. Now revised and updated, this book tells the story of how the automobile transformed American life and how automotive design and technology have changed over time. It details cars' inception as a mechanical curiosity and later a plaything for the wealthy; racing and the promotion of the industry; Henry Ford and the advent of mass production; market competition during the 1920s; the development of roads and accompanying highway culture; the effects of the Great Depression and World War II; the automotive Golden Age of the 1950s; oil crises and the turbulent 1970s; the decline and then resurgence of the Big Three; and how American car culture has been represented in film, music and literature. Updated notes and a select bibliography serve as valuable resources to those interested in automotive history.
Posted in Transportation

Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Jessica Bruder

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393249328

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 9134

The end of retirement? From the beet fields of North Dakota to the National Forest campgrounds of California to Amazon’s CamperForce program in Texas, employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that social security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road by the tens of thousands in late-model RVs, travel trailers, and vans, forming a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves “workampers.” On frequently traveled routes between seasonal jobs, Jessica Bruder meets people from all walks of life: a former professor, a McDonald’s vice president, a minister, a college administrator, and a motorcycle cop, among many others—including her irrepressible protagonist, a onetime cocktail waitress, Home Depot clerk, and general contractor named Linda May. In a secondhand vehicle she christens “Van Halen,” Bruder hits the road to get to know her subjects more intimately. Accompanying Linda May and others from campground toilet cleaning to warehouse product scanning to desert reunions, then moving on to the dangerous work of beet harvesting, Bruder tells a compelling, eye-opening tale of the dark underbelly of the American economy—one that foreshadows the precarious future that may await many more of us. At the same time, she celebrates the exceptional resilience and creativity of these quintessential Americans who have given up ordinary rootedness to survive. Like Linda May, who dreams of finding land on which to build her own sustainable “Earthship” home, they have not given up hope.
Posted in Social Science

This Day in Automotive History

Author: Brian Corey

Publisher: Veloce Publishing

ISBN: 9781787110687

Category: Transportation

Page: 196

View: 6671

This book tells fascinating tales, bringing individual days to life with short stories, photographs and illustrations. From the first self-powered vehicles to modern advances in technology, many topics are covered surrounding the turbulent history of the automobile. The births and deaths of automotive innovators, the rise and fall of car companies lost to history, incredible days at the racetrack, relevant inventions, the introduction of some of the greatest cars ever built, and many more true events from around the world are described in their day in This Day in Automotive History.
Posted in Transportation

The Car

Author: Gary Paulsen

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544836723

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 192

View: 7868

Fourteen-year-old Terry Anders is a 1990s Huck Finn, with parents as neglectful as Pap. Like Huck, he escapes, not on a raft but by constructing a kit car. “Besides evoking a type of independence and tough-mindedness that will appeal to teens, this provocative novel introduces and explores some interesting philosophies of life while stressing the value of learning from experience.”—Publishers Weekly
Posted in Young Adult Fiction

Return to Glory

The Story of Ford's Revival and Victory in the Toughest Race in the World

Author: Matthew DeBord

Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press

ISBN: 0802189555

Category: Transportation

Page: 272

View: 2385

In January, 2015 at the Detroit Auto Show, Ford unveiled a new car and the automotive world lost its collective mind. This wasn’t some new Explorer or Focus. Onto the stage rolled a supercar, a carbon-fiber GT powered by a mid-mounted six cylinder Ecoboost engine that churned out over 600 horsepower. It was sexy, jaw dropping, but more than that, it was historic, a callback to the legendary Ford GT40 Mk IIs that stuck it to Ferrari and finished 1-2-3 at Le Mans in 1966. Detroit was back, and Ford was going back to Le Mans. Journalist Matthew DeBord has been covering the auto industry for years, and in Return to Glory, he tells the recent story of Ford. A decade ago, CEO Alan Mulally took over the iconic company, and thanks to a financial gamble and his “One Ford” plan, helped it weather the financial crisis and a stock price that plunged to $1 a share, without a government bailout. It was enough for the company to dream of repeating racing history. DeBord revisits the story of the 1960s, details the creation of the new GT, and follows the team through the racing season, from an inauspicious debut at Daytona where the cars kept breaking down, to glimmers of hope at Sebring, and the team’s first victory at Laguna Seca in Monterey. Finally, DeBord joins the Ford team in Le Mans in June, 2016. This fabled 24-hour endurance race is designed to break cars and drivers, and it was at Le Mans, fifty years after the company’s greatest triumph, that Ford’s comeback was put to the ultimate test.
Posted in Transportation

The Life of the Automobile

The Complete History of the Motor Car

Author: Steven Parissien

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466836237

Category: Transportation

Page: 448

View: 3441

The Life of the Automobile is the first comprehensive world history of the car. The automobile has arguably shaped the modern era more profoundly than any other human invention, and author Steven Parissien examines the impact, development, and significance of the automobile over its turbulent and colorful 130-year history. Readers learn the grand and turbulent history of the motor car, from its earliest appearance in the 1880s—as little more than a powered quadricycle—and the innovations of the early pioneer carmakers. The author examines the advances of the interwar era, the Golden Age of the 1950s, and the iconic years of the 1960s to the decades of doubt and uncertainty following the oil crisis of 1973, the global mergers of the 1990s, the bailouts of the early twenty-first century, and the emergence of the electric car. This is not just a story of horsepower and performance but a tale of extraordinary people: of intuitive carmakers such as Karl Benz, Sir Henry Royce, Giovanni Agnelli (Fiat), André Citroën, and Louis Renault; of exceptionally gifted designers such as the eccentric, Ohio-born Chris Bangle (BMW); and of visionary industrialists such as Henry Ford, Ferdinand Porsche (the Volkswagen Beetle), and Gene Bordinat (the Ford Mustang), among numerous other game changers. Above all, this comprehensive history demonstrates how the epic story of the car mirrors the history of the modern era, from the brave hopes and soaring ambitions of the early twentieth century to the cynicism and ecological concerns of a century later. Bringing to life the flamboyant entrepreneurs, shrewd businessmen, and gifted engineers that worked behind the scenes to bring us horsepower and performance, The Life of the Automobile is a globe-spanning account of the auto industry that is sure to rev the engines of entrepreneurs and gearheads alike.
Posted in Transportation

Bad Girls Go Everywhere

The Life of Helen Gurley Brown, the Woman Behind Cosmopolitan Magazine

Author: Jennifer Scanlon

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101532289

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 8522

The biography of the revolutionary magazine editor who created the “Cosmo Girl” before Sex and the City’s Carrie Bradshaw was even born As the author of the iconic Sex and the Single Girl (1962) and the editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine for over three decades, Helen Gurley Brown (1922–2012) changed how women thought about sex, money, and their bodies in a way that resonates in our culture today. In Jennifer Scanlon's widely acclaimed biography, the award-winning scholar reveals Brown’s incredible life story from her escape from her humble beginnings in the Ozarks to her eyebrow-raising exploits as a young woman in New York City, and her late-blooming career as the world's first "lipstick feminist." A mesmerizing tribute to a legend, Bad Girls Go Everywhere will appeal to everyone from Sex and the City and Mad Men fans to students of women's history and media studies.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Sex in the Heartland

Author: Beth L. BAILEY

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674020399

Category: Social Science

Page: 294

View: 7075

Sex in the Heartland is the story of the sexual revolution in a small university town in the quintessential heartland state of Kansas. Bypassing the oft-told tales of radicals and revolutionaries on either coast, Beth Bailey argues that the revolution was forged in towns and cities alike, as "ordinary" people struggled over the boundaries of public and private sexual behavior in postwar America. Bailey fundamentally challenges contemporary perceptions of the revolution as simply a triumph of free love and gay lib. Rather, she explores the long-term and mainstream changes in American society, beginning in the economic and social dislocations of World War II and the explosion of mass media and communication, which aided and abetted the sexual upheaval of the 1960s. Focusing on Lawrence, Kansas, we discover the intricacies and depth of a transformation that was nurtured at the grass roots. Americans used the concept of revolution to make sense of social and sexual changes as they lived through them. Everything from the birth control pill and counterculture to Civil Rights, was conflated into "the revolution," an accessible but deceptive simplification, too easy to both glorify and vilify. Bailey untangles the radically different origins, intentions, and outcomes of these events to help us understand their roles and meanings for sex in contemporary America. She argues that the sexual revolution challenged and partially overturned a system of sexual controls based on oppression, inequality, and exploitation, and created new models of sex and gender relations that have shaped our society in powerful and positive ways. Table of Contents: Introduction Before the Revolution Sex and the Therapeutic Culture Responsible Sex Prescribing the Pill Revolutionary Intent Sex as a Weapon Sex and Liberation Remaking Sex Epilogue Abbreviations Notes Acknowledgments Index Reviews of this book: [A] vivid reminder of just how national and chaotic the events we call 'the sixties' really were...Bailey's exploration of the sexual revolution offers a subtler sense of the underlying forces of that era, which unified even while dividing a nation and, ultimately, the world. --Tom Engelhardt, The Nation Reviews of this book: [Beth Bailey's] applied research here is interesting, imaginative and compassionate, and the final treat is that Bailey is a very good writer. Sex in the Heartland is simply a fascinating read. I'm sorry I can't call her up and congratulate her on this book in person...[This book is] beautifully shaped, carefully thought out, a treasury of useful information. --Carolyn See, Washington Post Reviews of this book: One of the great strengths of this book is Bailey's ability to make local characters, institutions and fights vital and compelling, all the while keeping an eye on the broader issues at stake. She gives us a vivid portrait of one university town in transition and a case study for U.S. social history. A cast of local characters comes alive...Virtually every chapter has surprising, subtle turns in which Bailey's thesis of historical paradox and unintended consequences is amply demonstrated. --Maureen McLane, Chicago Tribune Reviews of this book: Published by the prestigious Harvard University Press, the book suggests that out-of-the-mainstream states such as Kansas actually were on the cutting edge of the nation's sexual revolution during the early 1960s. --Matt Moline, Capital-Journal Reviews of this book: "[Bailey] points out that those who claim the radical nature of the [sexual] revolution may be surprised by just how deep-seated and mainstream the origins of many of those revolutionary changes were." --Philip Godwin, M.D., Journal-World Reviews of this book: "Bailey examines the 20th-century 'sexual revolution' as it played out in the midwestern college town of Lawrence, Kansas...Bailey is especially perceptive on the ambivalent and conflicted relationship of both the feminist and gay rights movements to the sexual revolution. She also has strong sections on the birth control pill and other moremundane but long-lasting changes in American sexual culture...[A] fascinating and impressive book." --K. Blaser, Choice
Posted in Social Science

The Driver in the Driverless Car

How Our Technology Choices Will Create the Future

Author: Vivek Wadhwa,Alex Salkever

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 162656972X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 8516

A computer beats the reigning human champion of Go, a game harder than chess. Another is composing classical music. Labs are creating life-forms from synthetic DNA. A doctor designs an artificial trachea, uses a 3D printer to produce it, and implants it and saves a child's life. Astonishing technological advances like these are arriving in increasing numbers. Scholar and entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa uses this book to alert us to dozens of them and raise important questions about what they may mean for us. Breakthroughs such as personalized genomics, self-driving vehicles, drones, and artificial intelligence could make our lives healthier, safer, and easier. But the same technologies raise the specter of a frightening, alienating future: eugenics, a jobless economy, complete loss of privacy, and ever-worsening economic inequality. As Wadhwa puts it, our choices will determine if our future is Star Trek or Mad Max. Wadhwa offers us three questions to ask about every emerging technology: Does it have the potential to benefit everyone equally? What are its risks and rewards? And does it promote autonomy or dependence? Looking at a broad array of advances in this light, he emphasizes that the future is up to us to create—that even if our hands are not on the wheel, we will decide the driverless car's destination.
Posted in Business & Economics

Door to Door

The Magnificent, Maddening, Mysterious World of Transportation

Author: Edward Humes

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062372092

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 2450

The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of Garbology explores the hidden and costly wonders of our buy-it-now, get-it-today world of transportation, revealing the surprising truths, mounting challenges, and logistical magic behind every trip we take and every click we make. Transportation dominates our daily existence. Thousands, even millions, of miles are embedded in everything we do and touch. We live in a door-to-door universe that works so well most Americans are scarcely aware of it. The grand ballet in which we move ourselves and our stuff is equivalent to building the Great Pyramid, the Hoover Dam, and the Empire State Building all in a day. Every day. And yet, in the one highly visible part of the transportation world—the part we drive—we suffer grinding commutes, a violent death every fifteen minutes, a dire injury every twelve seconds, and crumbling infrastructure. Now, the way we move ourselves and our stuff is on the brink of great change, as a new mobility revolution upends the car culture that, for better and worse, built modern America. This unfolding revolution will disrupt lives and global trade, transforming our commutes, our vehicles, our cities, our jobs, and every aspect of culture, commerce, and the environment. We are, quite literally, at a fork in the road, though whether it will lead us to Carmageddon or Carmaheaven has yet to be determined. Using interviews, data and deep exploration of the hidden world of ports, traffic control centers, and the research labs defining our transportation future, acclaimed journalist Edward Humes breaks down the complex movements of humans, goods, and machines as never before, from increasingly car-less citizens to the distance UPS goes to deliver a leopard-printed phone case. Tracking one day in the life of his family in Southern California, Humes uses their commutes, traffic jams, grocery stops, and online shopping excursions as a springboard to explore the paradoxes and challenges inherent in our system. He ultimately makes clear that transportation is one of the few big things we can change—our personal choices do have a profound impact, and that fork in the road is coming up fast. Door to Door is a fascinating detective story, investigating the worldwide cast of supporting characters and technologies that have enabled us to move from here to there—past, present, and future.
Posted in Business & Economics

The Unbanking of America

How the New Middle Class Survives

Author: Lisa Servon

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544611187

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 360

An urgent, absorbing exposé—why Americans are fleeing our broken banking system in growing numbers, and how alternatives are rushing in to do what banks once did What do an undocumented immigrant in the South Bronx, a high-net-worth entrepreneur, and a twenty-something graduate student have in common? All three are victims of our dysfunctional mainstream bank and credit system. Today nearly half of all Americans live from paycheck to paycheck, and income volatility has doubled over the past thirty years. Banks, with their high monthly fees and overdraft charges, are gouging their low- and middle-income customers, while serving only the wealthiest Americans. Lisa Servon delivers a stunning indictment of America’s banks, together with eye-opening dispatches from inside a range of banking alternatives that have sprung up to fill the void. She works as a teller at RiteCheck, a check-cashing business in the South Bronx, and as a payday lender in Oakland. She looks closely at the workings of a tanda, an informal lending club. And she delivers fascinating, hopeful portraits of the entrepreneurs reacting to the unbanking of America by designing systems to creatively serve many of us. Banks were once essential pillars of our lives; now we can no longer count on them to do right by us. "Required reading for fans of muckraking authors like Barbara Ehrenreich, this fascinating look at the future of money management insists that the 'unbanked' are a sector deserving of respect and solid options." —Publishers Weekly, starred review
Posted in Social Science

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

Author: James Thurber

Publisher: The Creative Company

ISBN: 9781583415863

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 2673

A henpecked husband copes with the frustrations of his dull life by imagining he is a fearless airplane pilot, a brilliant doctor, and other dashing figures.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

The Girls' Guide to Conquering Life

How to Ace an Interview, Change a Tire, Talk to a Guy, and 97 Other Skills You Need to Thrive

Author: Erica Catherman,Jonathan Catherman

Publisher: Revell

ISBN: 1493414062

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 304

View: 2956

There's a lot a girl needs to know as she grows up and makes her way in the world. Having a reference guide of practical how-to life skills and character traits can empower her to become a confident and capable woman. Coauthors Erica and Jonathan Catherman offer this collection of step-by-step instructions on 100 things girls need to succeed, including how to - introduce yourself - change a flat tire - respectfully break up with a guy - leave a tip - apply for a job - ask for a promotion - behave during a police stop - create a personal budget - calculate square footage - wash your face - clear a clogged drain - iron a shirt - wear a scarf - shoot a basketball - sharpen kitchen knives - and much more In fact, if it's in here, it's an important skill or character trait practiced by capable and confident women. With great illustrations and sidebars of advice from world-class experts, this all-in-one reference tool for young women in the making is the perfect gift for birthdays, graduations, or any occasion.
Posted in Young Adult Nonfiction

Game, Set, Match

Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports

Author: Susan Ware

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807834541

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 282

View: 7461

Argues that Billie Jean King's 1973 defeat of male player Bobby Riggs in tennis' Battle of the Sexes match helped, along with the passage of the Title IX anti-sex discrimination act, cause a revolution in women's sports.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Horse, the Wheel, and Language

How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World

Author: David W. Anthony

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 069114818X

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 7364

Roughly half the world's population speaks languages derived from a shared linguistic source known as Proto-Indo-European. But who were the early speakers of this ancient mother tongue, and how did they manage to spread it around the globe? Until now their identity has remained a tantalizing mystery to linguists, archaeologists, and even Nazis seeking the roots of the Aryan race. The Horse, the Wheel, and Language lifts the veil that has long shrouded these original Indo-European speakers, and reveals how their domestication of horses and use of the wheel spread language and transformed civilization. Linking prehistoric archaeological remains with the development of language, David Anthony identifies the prehistoric peoples of central Eurasia's steppe grasslands as the original speakers of Proto-Indo-European, and shows how their innovative use of the ox wagon, horseback riding, and the warrior's chariot turned the Eurasian steppes into a thriving transcontinental corridor of communication, commerce, and cultural exchange. He explains how they spread their traditions and gave rise to important advances in copper mining, warfare, and patron-client political institutions, thereby ushering in an era of vibrant social change. Anthony also describes his fascinating discovery of how the wear from bits on ancient horse teeth reveals the origins of horseback riding. The Horse, the Wheel, and Language solves a puzzle that has vexed scholars for two centuries--the source of the Indo-European languages and English--and recovers a magnificent and influential civilization from the past.
Posted in History