White Backlash

Immigration, Race, and American Politics

Author: Marisa Abrajano,Zoltan L. Hajnal

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691176191

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 1831

White Backlash provides an authoritative assessment of how immigration is reshaping the politics of the nation. Using an array of data and analysis, Marisa Abrajano and Zoltan Hajnal show that fears about immigration fundamentally influence white Americans' core political identities, policy preferences, and electoral choices, and that these concerns are at the heart of a large-scale defection of whites from the Democratic to the Republican Party. Abrajano and Hajnal demonstrate that this political backlash has disquieting implications for the future of race relations in America. White Americans' concerns about Latinos and immigration have led to support for policies that are less generous and more punitive and that conflict with the preferences of much of the immigrant population. America's growing racial and ethnic diversity is leading to a greater racial divide in politics. As whites move to the right of the political spectrum, racial and ethnic minorities generally support the left. Racial divisions in partisanship and voting, as the authors indicate, now outweigh divisions by class, age, gender, and other demographic measures. White Backlash raises critical questions and concerns about how political beliefs and future elections will change the fate of America's immigrants and minorities, and their relationship with the rest of the nation.
Posted in Political Science

Before Brown

Civil Rights and White Backlash in the Modern South

Author: Glenn Feldman

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817351345

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 8050

Detailing the ferment in civil rights that took place across the South before the momentous Brown vs. Board of Education decision in 1954, this collection refutes the notion that the movement began with the Supreme Court decision, and suggests, rather, that the movement originated in the 1930s and earlier, spurred by the Great Depression and, later, World War II.
Posted in History

White Backlash and the Politics of Multiculturalism

Author: Roger Hewitt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139443524

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 4437

The murder of Stephen Lawrence led to the widest review of institutional racism seen in the UK. Sections of the white working-class communities in south London near to the scene of the murder, however, displayed deep hostility to the equalities and multiculturalist practice of the local state and other agencies. Drawing on extensive ethnographic research, this book relates these phenomena to the 'backlash' to multiculturalism evident during the 1990s in the USA, Australia, Canada, the UK and other European countries. It examines these within the unfolding social and political responses to race equalities in the UK and the USA from the 1960s to the present in the context of changes in social class and national political agendas. This book is unique in linking a detailed study of a community at a time of its critical importance to national debates over racism and multiculturalism, to historically wider international economic and social trends.
Posted in Social Science

The Rise and Fall of the Caucasian Race

A Political History of Racial Identity

Author: Bruce Baum

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814739433

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 9273

The term “Caucasian” is a curious invention of the modern age. Originating in 1795, the word identifies both the peoples of the Caucasus Mountains region as well as those thought to be “Caucasian”. Bruce Baum explores the history of the term and the category of the “Caucasian race” more broadly in the light of the changing politics of racial theory and notions of racial identity. With a comprehensive sweep that encompasses the understanding of "race" even before the use of the term “Caucasian,” Baum traces the major trends in scientific and intellectual understandings of “race” from the Middle Ages to the present day. Baum’s conclusions make an unprecedented attempt to separate modern science and politics from a long history of racial classification. He offers significant insights into our understanding of race and how the “Caucasian race” has been authoritatively invented, embraced, displaced, and recovered throughout our history.
Posted in Political Science

Backlash

What Happens When We Talk Honestly about Racism in America

Author: George Yancy

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1538104067

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 3430

When George Yancy penned a New York Times op-ed entitled “Dear White America” asking white Americans to confront the ways that they benefit from racism, he knew his article would be controversial. But he was unprepared for the flood of vitriol in response. The resulting blowback played out in the national media, with critics attacking Yancy in every form possible—including death threats—and supporters rallying to his side. Despite the rhetoric of a “post-race” America, Yancy quickly discovered that racism is still alive, crude, and vicious in its expression. In Backlash, Yancy expands upon the original article and chronicles the ensuing controversy as he seeks to understand what it was about the op-ed that created so much rage among so many white readers. He challenges white Americans to rise above the vitriol and to develop a new empathy for the African American experience.
Posted in Social Science

Welfare Racism

Playing the Race Card Against America's Poor

Author: Kenneth J. Neubeck,Noel A. Cazenave

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134001517

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 3016

Welfare Racism analyzes the impact of racism on US welfare policy. Through historical and present-day analysis, the authors show how race-based attitudes, policy making, and administrative policies have long had a negative impact on public assistance programs. The book adds an important and controversial voice to the current welfare debates surrounding the recent legilation that abolished the AFDC.
Posted in Social Science

The New White Nationalism in America

Its Challenge to Integration

Author: Carol M. Swain

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521808866

Category: Political Science

Page: 526

View: 6285

The author hopes to educate the public regarding white nationalists.
Posted in Political Science

Behind the Backlash

White Working-class Politics in Baltimore, 1940-1980

Author: Kenneth D. Durr

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807854334

Category: Social Science

Page: 284

View: 3614

In this nuanced look at white working-class life and politics in twentieth-century America, Kenneth Durr takes readers into the neighborhoods, workplaces, and community institutions of blue-collar Baltimore in the decades after World War II. Challengin
Posted in Social Science

Fremd in ihrem Land

Eine Reise ins Herz der amerikanischen Rechten

Author: Arlie Russell Hochschild

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN: 3593507668

Category: Political Science

Page: 429

View: 4360

In vielen westlichen Ländern sind rechte, nationalistische Bewegungen auf dem Vormarsch. Wie ist es dazu gekommen? Arlie Russell Hochschild reiste ins Herz der amerikanischen Rechten, nach Louisiana, und suchte fünf Jahre lang das Gespräch mit ihren Landsleuten. Sie traf auf frustrierte Menschen, deren "Amerikanischer Traum" geplatzt ist; Menschen, die sich abgehängt fühlen, den Staat hassen und sich der rechtspopulistischen Tea-Party-Bewegung angeschlossen haben. Hochschild zeigt eine beunruhigende Entwicklung auf, die auch in Europa längst begonnen hat. Hochschilds Reportage ist nicht nur eine erhellende Deutung einer gespaltenen Gesellschaft, sondern auch ein bewegendes Stück Literatur. "Jeder, der das moderne Amerika verstehen möchte, sollte dieses faszinierende Buch lesen." Robert Reich "Ein kluges, respektvolles und fesselndes Buch." New York Times Book Review "Eine anrührende, warmherzige und souverän geschriebene, ungemein gut lesbare teilnehmende Beobachtung. ... Wer ihr Buch liest, versteht die Wähler Trumps, weil sie auf Augenhöhe mit ihnen und nicht über sie spricht." FAZ
Posted in Political Science

Better Day Coming

Blacks and Equality, 1890-2000

Author: Adam Fairclough

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440684162

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 8594

From the end of postwar Reconstruction in the South to an analysis of the rise and fall of Black Power, acclaimed historian Adam Fairclough presents a straightforward synthesis of the century-long struggle of black Americans to achieve civil rights and equality in the United States. Beginning with Ida B. Wells and the campaign against lynching in the 1890s, Fairclough chronicles the tradition of protest that led to the formation of the NAACP, Booker T. Washington and the strategy of accommodation, Marcus Garvey and the push for black nationalism, through to Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and beyond. Throughout, Fairclough presents a judicious interpretation of historical events that balances the achievements of the Civil Rights Movement against the persistence of racial and economic inequalities.
Posted in History

Betrayal

How Black Intellectuals Have Abandoned the Ideals of the Civil Rights Era

Author: Houston A. Baker Jr.

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511442

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 5563

Houston A. Baker Jr. condemns those black intellectuals who, he believes, have turned their backs on the tradition of racial activism in America. These individuals choose personal gain over the interests of the black majority, whether they are espousing neoconservative positions that distort the contours of contemporary social and political dynamics or abandoning race as an important issue in the study of American literature and culture. Most important, they do a disservice to the legacy of W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King Jr., and others who have fought for black rights. In the literature, speeches, and academic and public behavior of some black intellectuals in the past quarter century, Baker identifies a "hungry generation" eager for power, respect, and money. Baker critiques his own impoverished childhood in the "Little Africa" section of Louisville, Kentucky, to understand the shaping of this new public figure. He also revisits classical sites of African American literary and historical criticism and critique. Baker devotes chapters to the writing and thought of such black academic superstars as Cornel West, Michael Eric Dyson, and Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Hoover Institution senior fellow Shelby Steele; Yale law professor Stephen Carter; and Manhattan Institute fellow John McWhorter. His provocative investigation into their disingenuous posturing exposes what Baker deems a tragic betrayal of King's legacy. Baker concludes with a discussion of American myth and the role of the U.S. prison-industrial complex in the "disappearing" of blacks. Baker claims King would have criticized these black intellectuals for not persistently raising their voices against a private prison system that incarcerates so many men and women of color. To remedy this situation, Baker urges black intellectuals to forge both sacred and secular connections with local communities and rededicate themselves to social responsibility. As he sees it, the mission of the black intellectual today is not to do great things but to do specific, racially based work that is in the interest of the black majority.
Posted in Social Science

White Ethnic New York

Jews, Catholics, and the Shaping of Postwar Politics

Author: Joshua M. Zeitz

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807872802

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 3548

Historians of postwar American politics often identify race as a driving force in the dynamically shifting political culture. Joshua Zeitz instead places religion and ethnicity at the fore, arguing that ethnic conflict among Irish Catholics, Italian Catholics, and Jews in New York City had a decisive impact on the shape of liberal politics long before black-white racial identity politics entered the political lexicon. Understanding ethnicity as an intersection of class, national origins, and religion, Zeitz demonstrates that the white ethnic populations of New York had significantly diverging views on authority and dissent, community and individuality, secularism and spirituality, and obligation and entitlement. New York Jews came from Eastern European traditions that valued dissent and encouraged political agitation; their Irish and Italian Catholic neighbors tended to value commitment to order, deference to authority, and allegiance to church and community. Zeitz argues that these distinctions ultimately helped fracture the liberal coalition of the Roosevelt era, as many Catholics bolted a Democratic Party increasingly focused on individual liberties, and many dissent-minded Jews moved on to the antiliberal New Left.
Posted in History

Making a Difference

University Students of Color Speak Out

Author: Julia Lesage,Abby L. Ferber,Debbie Storrs,Donna Wong

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742500808

Category: Education

Page: 242

View: 3392

In Making a Difference, students of color relate their first-hand experiences with educational systems and campus living conditions. Their narratives provide an insider perspective useful to anyone working on diversity issues who is trying to improve institutional culture and policy. The contextualizing essays following the student narratives are written by academics and student affairs professionals who draw links between issues of institutional access, recruitment and retention of students and faculty of color, curriculum changes, teaching strategies—especially for teaching whiteness and racial identity formation, campus climate, and the relation between an individual institution's history of dealing with race to developments in public policy.
Posted in Education

School Desegregation

Oral Histories toward Understanding the Effects of White Domination

Author: George W. Noblit

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9462099650

Category: Education

Page: 226

View: 6780

This book is written for the Millennial Generation to educate them about what school desegregation was actually about—the struggle over white domination in the United States. The textbooks they read as high school students describe the heroic efforts of African Americans to achieve civil rights but do not describe who was denying them these rights—white Americans. The oral histories in this book reveal how individuals navigated efforts to achieve educational equity amidst efforts to reassert white domination. These accounts counter the textbook history the Millennial Generation read which omits the massive white resistance to school desegregation, the various ways whites used subterfuge to slow down and redirect school desegregation in what would more benefit whites, and the concerted white political backlash that has been ensconced in educational policy and reform beginning with A Nation at Risk and continuing in No Child Left Behind. That is, educational policy as we know it is all about asserting white domination and not about educating children, and thus the Millennial Generation is faced with undoing what their parents and grandparents have done.
Posted in Education

America in Black and White

One Nation, Indivisible

Author: Stephan Thernstrom,Abigail Thernstrom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439129098

Category: Social Science

Page: 704

View: 4721

In a book destined to become a classic, Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom present important new information about the positive changes that have been achieved and the measurable improvement in the lives of the majority of African-Americans. Supporting their conclusions with statistics on education, earnings, and housing, they argue that the perception of serious racial divisions in this country is outdated -- and dangerous.
Posted in Social Science

Rule and Ruin

The Downfall of Moderation and the Destruction of the Republican Party, From Eisenhower to the Tea Party

Author: Geoffrey Kabaservice

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199912904

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 9206

The chaotic events leading up to Mitt Romney's defeat in the 2012 election indicated how far the Republican Party had rocketed rightward away from the center of public opinion. Republicans in Congress threatened to shut down the government and force a U.S. debt default. Tea Party activists mounted primary challenges against Republican officeholders who appeared to exhibit too much pragmatism or independence. Moderation and compromise were dirty words in the Republican presidential debates. The GOP, it seemed, had suddenly become a party of ideological purity. Except this development is not new at all. In Rule and Ruin, Geoffrey Kabaservice reveals that the moderate Republicans' downfall began not with the rise of the Tea Party but about the time of President Dwight Eisenhower's farewell address. Even in the 1960s, when left-wing radicalism and right-wing backlash commanded headlines, Republican moderates and progressives formed a powerful movement, supporting pro-civil rights politicians like Nelson Rockefeller and William Scranton, battling big-government liberals and conservative extremists alike. But the Republican civil war ended with the overthrow of the moderate ideas, heroes, and causes that had comprised the core of the GOP since its formation. In hindsight, it is today's conservatives who are "Republicans in Name Only." Writing with passionate sympathy for a bygone tradition of moderation, Kabaservice recaptures a time when fiscal restraint was matched with social engagement; when a cohort of leading Republicans opposed the Vietnam war; when George Romney--father of Mitt Romney--conducted a nationwide tour of American poverty, from Appalachia to Watts, calling on society to "listen to the voices from the ghetto." Rule and Ruin is an epic, deeply researched history that reorients our understanding of our political past and present. Today, following the Republicans' loss of the popular vote in five of the last six presidential contests, moderates remain marginalized in the GOP and progressives are all but nonexistent. In this insightful and elegantly argued book, Kabaservice contends that their decline has left Republicans less capable of governing responsibly, with dire consequences for all Americans. He has added a new afterword that considers the fallout from the 2012 elections.
Posted in History

Institutional Racism

A Primer on Theory and Strategies for Social Change

Author: Shirley Jean Better

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780830415793

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 4317

In the United States the economic exploitation of non-white groups has included the reliance on African American slave labor by Southern plantation owners, the systematic removal of Native Americans from their homelands to make room for white settlers, and the relegation of non-white workers to the most low-paid, dangerous and dirty jobs. Through numerous examples Shirley Better demonstrates that racism is embedded within the fabric of American society, restricting equal access to educational opportunities, employment, and housing. She explores the influence of racism in the criminal justice system where it leads to harsher penalties for members of non-white groups. Having outlined the causes and effects of institutional racism, the author presents numerous strategies for individuals and groups to combat this pervasive social problem.
Posted in Social Science

Country Soul

Making Music and Making Race in the American South

Author: Charles L. Hughes

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469622440

Category: Music

Page: 280

View: 4534

In the sound of the 1960s and 1970s, nothing symbolized the rift between black and white America better than the seemingly divided genres of country and soul. Yet the music emerged from the same songwriters, musicians, and producers in the recording studios of Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee, and Muscle Shoals, Alabama--what Charles L. Hughes calls the "country-soul triangle." In legendary studios like Stax and FAME, integrated groups of musicians like Booker T. and the MGs and the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section produced music that both challenged and reconfirmed racial divisions in the United States. Working with artists from Aretha Franklin to Willie Nelson, these musicians became crucial contributors to the era's popular music and internationally recognized symbols of American racial politics in the turbulent years of civil rights protests, Black Power, and white backlash. Hughes offers a provocative reinterpretation of this key moment in American popular music and challenges the conventional wisdom about the racial politics of southern studios and the music that emerged from them. Drawing on interviews and rarely used archives, Hughes brings to life the daily world of session musicians, producers, and songwriters at the heart of the country and soul scenes. In doing so, he shows how the country-soul triangle gave birth to new ways of thinking about music, race, labor, and the South in this pivotal period.
Posted in Music