What We Have Done

An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement

Author: Fred Pelka

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 1558499199

Category: History

Page: 622

View: 7962

"Nothing about us without us" has been a core principle of American disability rights activists for more than half a century. It represents a response by people with disabilities to being treated with scorn and abuse or as objects of pity, and to having the most fundamental decisions relating to their lives--where they would live; if and how they would be educated; if they would be allowed to marry or have families; indeed, if they would be permitted to live at all--made by those who were, in the parlance of the movement, "temporarily able-bodied." In What We Have Done: An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement, Fred Pelka takes that slogan at face value. He presents the voices of disability rights activists who, in the period from 1950 to 1990, transformed how society views people with disabilities, and recounts how the various streams of the movement came together to push through the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Beginning with the stories of those who grew up with disabilities in the 1940s and '50s, the book traces how disability came to be seen as a political issue, and how people with disabilities--often isolated, institutionalized, and marginalized--forged a movement analogous to the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights movements, and fought for full and equal participation in American society.
Posted in History

What We Have Done

An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement

Author: Fred Pelka

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 1558499180

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 622

View: 6102

"Nothing about us without us" has been a core principle of American disability rights activists for more than half a century. It represents a response by people with disabilities to being treated with scorn and abuse or as objects of pity, and to having the most fundamental decisions relating to their lives--where they would live; if and how they would be educated; if they would be allowed to marry or have families; indeed, if they would be permitted to live at all--made by those who were, in the parlance of the movement, "temporarily able-bodied." In What We Have Done: An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement, Fred Pelka takes that slogan at face value. He presents the voices of disability rights activists who, in the period from 1950 to 1990, transformed how society views people with disabilities, and recounts how the various streams of the movement came together to push through the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Beginning with the stories of those who grew up with disabilities in the 1940s and '50s, the book traces how disability came to be seen as a political issue, and how people with disabilities--often isolated, institutionalized, and marginalized--forged a movement analogous to the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights movements, and fought for full and equal participation in American society.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Disability Rights Movement

Author: Amy Hayes

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 1499426798

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 1692

People with disabilities have faced great struggle and inequality. This volume explores the ways in which people with disabilities have fought for their right to equal access, equal opportunities, and equal treatment. Key figures and events are highlighted to give readers a well-rounded sense of the movement. Photographs and primary sources bring the movement to life. Readers are challenged to think about what could be changed in the future to help people with disabilities live a full, fair life.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

Disability Protests

Contentious Politics 1970-1999

Author: Sharon N. Barnartt,Richard K. Scotch

Publisher: Gallaudet University Press

ISBN: 9781563681127

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 3411

This volume offers an incisive, sociological analysis of 30 years of protests, organizations, and legislative victories within the deaf and disabled populations. Tables. 11/01.
Posted in Political Science

Nothing about Us Without Us

Disability Oppression and Empowerment

Author: James I. Charlton

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520224810

Category: Political Science

Page: 197

View: 6140

"A study of the global oppression of people with disabilities and the international movement that has recently emerged to resist it ... A theoretical overview of disability oppression that shows its similarities to, and differences from, racism, sexism, and colonialism."--Jacket.
Posted in Political Science

Freedom on the Border

An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky

Author: Catherine Fosl,Tracy E. K'Meyer

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813139015

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 510

Memories fade, witnesses pass away, and the stories of how social change took place are often lost. Many of those stories, however, have been preserved thanks to the dozens of civil rights activists across Kentucky who shared their memories in the wide-ranging oral history project from which this volume arose. Through their collective memories and the efforts of a new generation of historians, the stories behind the marches, vigils, court cases, and other struggles to overcome racial discrimination are finally being brought to light. In Freedom on the Border: An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky, Catherine Fosl and Tracy E. K'Meyer gather the voices of more than one hundred courageous crusaders for civil rights, many of whom have never before spoken publicly about their experiences. These activists hail from all over Kentucky, offering a wide representation of the state's geography and culture while explaining the civil rights movement in their respective communities and in their own words. Grounded in oral history, this book offers new insights into the diverse experiences and ground-level perspectives of the activists. This approach often highlights the contradictions between the experiences of individual activists and commonly held beliefs about the larger movement. Interspersed among the chapters are in-depth profiles of activists such as Kentucky general assemblyman Jesse Crenshaw and Helen Fisher Frye, past president of the Danville NAACP. These activists describe the many challenges that Kentuckians faced during the civil rights movement, such as inequality in public accommodations, education, housing, and politics. By placing the narratives in the social context of state, regional, and national trends, Fosl and K'Meyer demonstrate how contemporary race relations in Kentucky are marked by many of the same barriers that African Americans faced before and during the civil rights movement. From city streets to mountain communities, in areas with black populations large and small, Kentucky's civil rights movement was much more than a series of mass demonstrations, campaigns, and elite-level policy decisions. It was also the sum of countless individual struggles, including the mother who sent her child to an all-white school, the veteran who refused to give up when denied a job, and the volunteer election worker who decided to run for office herself. In vivid detail, Freedom on the Border brings this mosaic of experiences to life and presents a new, compelling picture of a vital and little-understood era in the history of Kentucky and the nation.
Posted in History

Disabled Education

A Critical Analysis of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

Author: Ruth Colker

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 081470848X

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 891

Enacted in 1975, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act – now called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) provides all children with the right to a free and appropriate public education. On the face of it, the IDEA is a shining example of law’s democratizing impulse. But is that really the case? In Disabled Education, Ruth Colker digs deep beneath the IDEA’s surface and reveals that the IDEA contains flaws that were evident at the time of its enactment that limit its effectiveness for poor and minority children. Both an expert in disability law and the mother of a child with a hearing impairment, Colker learned first-hand of the Act’s limitations when she embarked on a legal battle to persuade her son’s school to accommodate his impairment. Colker was able to devote the considerable resources of a middle-class lawyer to her struggle and ultimately won, but she knew that the IDEA would not have benefitted her son without her time-consuming and costly legal intervention. Her experience led her to investigate other cases, which confirmed her suspicions that the IDEA best serves those with the resources to advocate strongly for their children. The IDEA also works only as well as the rest of the system does: struggling schools that serve primarily poor students of color rarely have the funds to provide appropriate special education and related services to their students with disabilities. Through a close examination of the historical evolution of the IDEA, the actual experiences of children who fought for their education in court, and social science literature on the meaning of “learning disability,” Colker reveals the IDEA’s shortcomings, but also suggests ways in which resources might be allocated more evenly along class lines.
Posted in Law

Disability

The Basics

Author: Tom Shakespeare

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317230167

Category: Social Science

Page: 186

View: 2041

Disability: The Basics is an engaging and accessible introduction to disability which explores the broad historical, social, environmental, economic and legal factors which affect the experiences of those living with an impairment or illness in contemporary society. The book explores key introductory topics including: the diversity of the disability experience; disability rights and advocacy; ways in which disabled people have been treated throughout history and in different parts of the world; the daily realities of living with an impairment or illness; health, education, employment and other services that exist to support and include disabled people; ethical issues at the beginning and end of life. Disability: The Basics aims to provide readers with an understanding of the lived experiences of disabled people and highlight the continuing gaps and barriers in social responses to the challenge of disability. This book is suitable for lay people, students of disability studies as well as students taking a disability module as part of a wider course within social work, health care, sociology, nursing, policy and media studies.
Posted in Social Science

Freedom's Daughters

The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970

Author: Lynne Olson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684850125

Category: History

Page: 460

View: 7381

Profiles the fearless, resourceful female leaders of the civil rights movement, including Ida Wells, who led the protest against lynching, and Jo Ann Robinson, who helped launch the Montgomery bus boycott.
Posted in History

Always in Trouble

An Oral History of ESP-Disk’, the Most Outrageous Record Label in America

Author: Jason Weiss

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819571601

Category: Music

Page: 304

View: 4687

In 1964, Bernard Stollman launched the independent record label ESP-Disk’ in New York City to document the free jazz movement there. A bare-bones enterprise, ESP was in the right place at the right time, producing albums by artists like Albert Ayler, Pharoah Sanders, and Sun Ra, as well as folk-rock bands like the Fugs and Pearls Before Swine. But the label quickly ran into difficulties and, due to the politically subversive nature of some productions and sloppy business practices, it folded in 1974. Always in Trouble tells the story of ESP-Disk’ through a multitude of voices—first Stollman’s, as he recounts the improbable life of the label, and then the voices of many of the artists involved.
Posted in Music

Lighting the Fires of Freedom

African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Janet Dewart Bell

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620973367

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5658

One of Book Riot's “29 Amazing New Books Coming in 2018” A groundbreaking collection based on oral histories that brilliantly plumb the leadership of African American women in the twentieth-century fight for civil rights—many nearly lost to history—from the latest winner of the Studs and Ida Terkel Prize During the Civil Rights Movement, African American women were generally not in the headlines; they simply did the work that needed to be done. Yet despite their significant contributions at all levels of the movement, they remain mostly invisible to the larger public. Beyond Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, and Dorothy Height, most Americans, black and white alike, would be hard-pressed to name other leaders at the community, local, and national levels. In Lighting the Fires of Freedom Janet Dewart Bell shines a light on women’s all-too-often overlooked achievements in the Movement. Through wide-ranging conversations with nine women, several now in their nineties with decades of untold stories, we hear what ignited and fueled their activism, as Bell vividly captures their inspiring voices. Lighting the Fires of Freedom offers these deeply personal and intimate accounts of extraordinary struggles for justice that resulted in profound social change, stories that remain important and relevant today. Published to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, Lighting the Fires of Freedom is a vital document for understanding the Civil Rights Movement and an enduring testament to the vitality of women’s leadership during one of the most dramatic periods of American history.
Posted in History

Toward the Meeting of the Waters

Currents in the Civil Rights Movement of South Carolina During the Twentieth Century

Author: Winfred B. Moore,Orville Vernon Burton

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 9781570037559

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 1006

Bringing together voices of leading historians alongside recollections from central participants, this text provides a comprehensive history of the civil rights movement as experienced by black and white South Carolinians.
Posted in History

A Disability History of the United States

Author: Kim E. Nielsen

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807022039

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 4442

The first book to cover the entirety of disability history, from pre-1492 to the present Disability is not just the story of someone we love or the story of whom we may become; rather it is undoubtedly the story of our nation. Covering the entirety of US history from pre-1492 to the present, A Disability History of the United States is the first book to place the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American narrative. In many ways, it’s a familiar telling. In other ways, however, it is a radical repositioning of US history. By doing so, the book casts new light on familiar stories, such as slavery and immigration, while breaking ground about the ties between nativism and oralism in the late nineteenth century and the role of ableism in the development of democracy. A Disability History of the United States pulls from primary-source documents and social histories to retell American history through the eyes, words, and impressions of the people who lived it. As historian and disability scholar Nielsen argues, to understand disability history isn’t to narrowly focus on a series of individual triumphs but rather to examine mass movements and pivotal daily events through the lens of varied experiences. Throughout the book, Nielsen deftly illustrates how concepts of disability have deeply shaped the American experience—from deciding who was allowed to immigrate to establishing labor laws and justifying slavery and gender discrimination. Included are absorbing—at times horrific—narratives of blinded slaves being thrown overboard and women being involuntarily sterilized, as well as triumphant accounts of disabled miners organizing strikes and disability rights activists picketing Washington. Engrossing and profound, A Disability History of the United States fundamentally reinterprets how we view our nation’s past: from a stifling master narrative to a shared history that encompasses us all.
Posted in Social Science

Ed Roberts

Wheelchair Genius

Author: Steven Brown

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781931145060

Category:

Page: 52

View: 3878

Middle grade biography of American disability rights pioneer and activist, Ed Roberts.
Posted in

Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour

A Narrative History of Black Power in America

Author: Peniel E. Joseph

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780805083354

Category: History

Page: 399

View: 9184

A history of the Black Power movement in the United States traces the origins and evolution of the influential movement and examines the ways in which Black Power redefined racial identity and culture.
Posted in History

Disability Histories

Author: Susan Burch,Michael Rembis

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025209669X

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 3537

The field of disability history continues to evolve rapidly. In this collection, Susan Burch and Michael Rembis present nineteen essays that integrate critical analysis of gender, race, historical context, and other factors to enrich and challenge the traditional modes of interpretation still dominating the field. As the first collection of its kind in over a decade, Disability Histories not only brings readers up to date on scholarship within the field but fosters the process of moving it beyond the U.S. and Western Europe by offering work on Africa, South America, and Asia. The result is a broad range of readings that open new vistas for investigation and study while encouraging scholars at all levels to redraw the boundaries that delineate who and what is considered of historical value. Informed and accessible, Disability Histories is essential for classrooms engaged in all facets of disability studies within and across disciplines. Contributors are Frances Bernstein, Daniel Blackie, Pamela Block, Elsbeth Bösl, Dea Boster, Susan K. Cahn, Alison Carey, Fatima Cavalcante, Jagdish Chander, Audra Jennings, John Kinder, Catherine Kudlick, Paul R. D. Lawrie, Herbert Muyinda, Kim E. Nielsen, Katherine Ott, Stephen Pemberton, Anne Quartararo, Amy Renton, and Penny Richards.
Posted in Social Science

Ella Baker

Freedom Bound

Author: Joanne Grant

Publisher: Wiley

ISBN: 9780471327172

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 8438

Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Discussions on Disability Law and Policy

Author: Patricia C. Kuszler,Christy Thompson Ibrahim

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781611633955

Category: Law

Page: 449

View: 1516

Liven up your disability law or policy course with this diverse collection of cases, policy articles, stories, and questions. More traditional casebooks contain fragments of cases clumped together by statute, while this text contains interesting, multidisciplinary articles categorized by disability studies topics. The topics are cutting edge and were chosen based on demonstrated student interest over the years. Issues like the disability rights movement, deinstitutionalization, public transportation, inclusion, homelessness, immigration, the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and supported employment will engage students and introduce them to the diverse and intriguing issues of disability law and rights. This text can stand alone or can be used in conjunction with The U.S. Supreme Court on Disability Law: 16 Modern Cases or with An Anthology of Disability Literature.
Posted in Law