Urban Enclaves

Author: Mark Abrahamson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780716706366

Category: Social Science

Page: 210

View: 7877

Abrahamson explores metropolitan areas that have retained their distinctive ethnic, racial, and religious character in an era when American culture and landscape are increasingly homogenized. He revisits American urban dwellers in New York City, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Miami, and Detroit to find out why these communities continue to exist while others have not. In the new second edition, Abrahamson broadens the geographic and temporal scope to examine the formation of German communities in 19th century Brazil and American expatriate artists in post-WWI Paris. Urban Enclaves, Second Edition can be incorporated into a variety of courses in sociology, history, anthropology, and cultural geography.
Posted in Social Science

The New Century of the Metropolis

Urban Enclaves and Orientalism

Author: Thomas Angotti

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415615097

Category: Architecture

Page: 198

View: 9386

The problems created by metropolitanization have become increasingly apparent. Attempts to limit growth, disperse populations and plan neighbourhoods have been largely unsuccessful. Strategies are needed to improve the world's major cities in the twenty-first century. Tom Angotti is fundamentally optimistic about the future of the metropolis, but questions urban planning’s inability to integrate urban and rural systems, its contribution to the growth of inequality, and increasing enclave development throughout the world. Using the concept of 'urban orientalism' as a theoretical underpinning of modern urban planning grounded in global inequalities, Angotti confronts this traditional model with new, progressive approaches to community and metropolis. Written in clear, precise terms by an award-winning author, The New Century of the Metropolisargues that only when the city is understood as a necessary and beneficial acccompaniment to social progress can a progressive, humane approach to urban planning be developed.
Posted in Architecture

Rural Migrants in Urban China

Enclaves and Transient Urbanism

Author: Fulong Wu,Fangzhu Zhang,Chris Webster

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135095272

Category: Social Science

Page: 316

View: 4264

After millions of migrants moved from China’s countryside into its sprawling cities a unique kind of ‘informal’ urban enclave was born – ‘villages in the city’. Like the shanties and favelas before them elsewhere, there has been huge pressure to redevelop these blemishes to the urban face of China’s economic vision. Unlike most developing countries, however, these are not squatter settlements but owner-occupied settlements developed semi-formally by ex-farmers turned small-developers and landlords who rent shockingly high-density rooms to rural migrants, who can outnumber their landlord villagers. A strong state, matched with well-organised landlords collectively represented through joint-stock companies, has meant that it has been relatively easy to grow the city through demolition of these soft migrant enclaves. The lives of the displaced migrants then enter a transient phase from an informal to a formal urbanity. This book looks at migrants and their enclave ‘villages in the city’ and reveals the characteristics and changes in migrants’ livelihoods and living places. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the book analyses how living in the city transforms and changes rural migrant households, and explores the social lives and micro economies of migrant neighbourhoods. It goes on to discuss changing housing and social conditions and spatial changes in the urban villages of major Chinese cities, as well as looking into transient urbanism and examining the consequences of redevelopment and upgrading of the ‘villages in the city’; in particular, the planning, regeneration, politics of development, and socio-economic implications of these immense social, economic and physical upheavals.
Posted in Social Science

Chinatown

The Socioeconomic Potential of an Urban Enclave

Author: Min Zhou

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439904176

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 301

View: 6367

Min Zhou examines how an ethnic enclave works to direct its members into American society, while at the same time shielding them from it. Focusing specifically on New York's Chinatown, a community established more than a century ago, Zhou offers a thorough and modern treatment of the enclave as a socioeconomic system, distinct form, but intrinsically linked with, the larger society. Zhou's central theme is that Chinatown does not keep immigrant Chinese from assimilating into mainstream society, but instead provides an alternative means of incorporation into society that does not conflict with cultural distinctiveness. Concentrating on the past two decades, Zhou maintains that community networks and social capital are important resources for reaching socioeconomic goals and social positions in the United States; in Chinatown, ethnic employers use family ties and ethnic resources to advance socially. Relying on her family's networks in New York's Chinatown and her fluency in both Cantonese and Mandarin, the author, who was born in the People's Republic of China, makes extensive use of personal interviews to present a rich picture of the daily work life in the community. She demonstrates that for many immigrants, low-paid menial jobs provide by the enclave are expected as a part of the time-honored path to upward social mobility of the family. In the series "Conflicts in Urban and Regional Development," edited by John R. Logan and Todd Swanstrom.
Posted in Business & Economics

From Urban Enclave to Ethnic Suburb

New Asian Communities in Pacific Rim Countries

Author: Wei Li

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824829117

Category: Social Science

Page: 278

View: 3505

From Urban Enclave to Ethnic Suburb focuses on the migration, settlement, and adaptation of Chinese and other Asian immigrants and their impacts on the transformation of metropolitan areas in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. These stories of the interactivity of Asian people and place in four nation-states are framed within the larger context of spatial and social patterns, migration, acculturation/assimilation, and racialization theories, and emerging landscapes in the inner cities and suburbs of metropolitan areas like Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Sydney, and Auckland. The book's primary arguments center on revisioning traditional assimilationist models of the Chicago School with the context of today's evolving metropolis. Other key elements include immigrant and refugee policies, new theories of ethnic settlement, and urban and suburban immigrant landscape forms. Nine chapters document the experiences of Asian immigrants and refugees--rich and poor, old and new. Their communities vary from no identifiable residential cluster (Vietnamese in Northern Virginia) to multiple residential and business clusters in both inner city and suburbs (Koreans in Los Angeles, Chinese in Toronto) to the largest suburban Chinese residential and business concentration (the San Gabriel Valley of suburban Los Angeles) and the high-tech Mecca of the U.S., if not the world (Silicon Valley), whose growth has been inseparable from workers, professionals, and entrepreneurs of Asian descents who are often local residents as well. Rich in detail and broad in scope, From Urban Enclave to Ethnic Suburb is the first book to focus exclusively on the Asian immigrant communities in multiethnic suburbs. It effectively demonstrates the complexity of contemporary Asian immigrant and refugee groups and the strength of their communities across the Pacific Rim. It will be welcomed by a wide range of readers with interests in Asian American studies, urban geography, the Chinese diaspora, immigration, and transnationalism. Contributors: Richard Bedford, Kevin Dunn, David W. Edgington, Michael A. Goldberg, Elsie Ho, Thomas A. Hutton, Hans Dieter Laux, Wei Li, Lucia Lo, John R. Logan, Edward J. W. Park, Suzannah Roberts, Christopher J. Smith, Gunter Thieme, Joseph S. Wood. "
Posted in Social Science

Reconstructing Chinatown

Ethnic Enclaves and Global Change

Author: N.A

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9781452903569

Category: Chinatown (New York, N.Y.)

Page: 248

View: 3684

Posted in Chinatown (New York, N.Y.)

Desegregating the City

Ghettos, Enclaves, and Inequality

Author: David P. Varady

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791483282

Category: Social Science

Page: 332

View: 8245

Multidisciplinary perspectives on segregation in the United States and other developed countries.
Posted in Social Science

Contagion and Enclaves

Tropical Medicine in Colonial India

Author: Nandini Bhattacharya

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 1846318297

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 8658

Contagion and Enclaves examines the social history of medicine across two intersecting British enclaves in the major tea-producing region of colonial India: the hill station of Darjeeling and the adjacent tea plantations of North Bengal. Focusing on the establishment of hill sanatoria and other health care facilities and practices against the backdrop of the expansion of tea cultivation and labor migration, it tracks the demographic and environmental transformation of the region and the critical role race and medicine played in it, showing that the British enclaves were essential and distinctive sites of the articulation of colonial power and economy.
Posted in History

The Urban Sociology Reader

Author: Jan Lin,Christopher Mele

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136244158

Category: Architecture

Page: 464

View: 3731

The urban world is an exciting terrain for investigating the central institutions, structures and problems of the social world and how they have transformed through the last 200 years. This Reader comprises sections on urban social theory, racial and social difference in the city, culture in everyday life, culture and the urban economy, globalization and transnational social relations and the regulation of urban space. Drawing together seminal selections covering the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, this Reader includes forty-three significant writings from eminent names such as Simmel, Wirth, Park, Burgess, DuBois, Zukin, Sassen, and Harvey. The 2nd edition illuminates more recent urban issues such as sprawl, sustainability, immigration and urban protest. Selections are predominantly sociological, but some readings cross disciplinary boundaries. Providing an essential resource for students of urban studies, this book brings together important but, till now, widely dispersed writings. Editorial commentaries precede each entry; introducing the text, demonstrating its significance, and outlining the issues surrounding its topic, whilst the associated bibliography enables deeper investigations.
Posted in Architecture

The Global Nomad

Backpacker Travel in Theory and Practice

Author: Greg Richards,Julie Wilson

Publisher: Channel View Publications

ISBN: 9781873150764

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 298

View: 7707

Backpackers have shifted from the margins of the travel industry into the global spotlight. This volume explores the international backpacker phenomenon, drawing together different disciplinary perspectives on its meaning, impact and significance. Links are drawn between theory and practice, setting backpacking in its wider social, cultural and economic context.
Posted in Business & Economics

A Street in Marrakech

A Personal View of Urban Women in Morocco

Author: Elizabeth Warnock Fernea

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 147860865X

Category: Social Science

Page: 382

View: 6676

This is a reflexive account of an American woman and her familys unpredictable journey through the private and public worlds of a traditional Muslim city in the process of change. As a Western stranger in Marrakech, Fernea was met with suspicion and hostility. The story of the slow growth of trust and acceptance between the author and her Moroccan neighbors involves the reader in everyday activities, weddings, funerals, and womens rituals. Both the author and her friends are changed by the encounters that she describes. A Street in Marrakech is a crosscultural adventure, ethnographically sound, and written in an accessible style.
Posted in Social Science

Urban Sociology

A Global Introduction

Author: Mark Abrahamson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107649412

Category: Social Science

Page: 225

View: 8683

This concise yet comprehensive overview of the political and economic development of the world's cities offers a unique emphasis on its cultural impacts. The book emphasizes the transition from modern (industrial) to post-modern (post-industrial) eras and its effect on established and developing global cities, and arguments are supported with case studies for each of the main concepts of urban theory and research. Mark Abrahamson analyzes contemporary global cities - ranging from Lagos to Los Angeles, Paris to Beijing - helping students relate concepts to concrete places and understand the global nature of contemporary urban development. Rigorous yet accessible, this textbook includes key learning features designed to enrich student understanding and engagement, including chapter-by-chapter glossaries, summaries, and suggestions for further reading.
Posted in Social Science

Backpacker Tourism and Economic Development

Perspectives from the Less Developed World

Author: Mark P. Hampton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135933014

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 166

View: 2188

There has been a phenomenal growth of backpacker tourism from the overland routes to India in the 1960s, to present-day backpacker tourism across the less developed world. As a result there has been significant economic development impacts of backpacker tourism upon local communities especially in areas with the largest concentrations of backpackers (South and South-East Asia particularly Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and India), as well as increasingly in Latin America. This volume provides a focused review of the economic development impacts of backpacker tourism in developing regions furthering knowledge on how backpacker tourism can play a crucial role in development strategies in these areas. First, it reviews the origins of the backpackers with a detailed examination of their "hippy" predecessors on the overland trail, before discussing the emergence of modern backpackers including social and cultural aspects, and how new technologies are changing their experience. It then analyses the powerful economic development impacts of backpackers on local host communities in cities and rural areas with a special focus on coastal destinations. Extensive case study material is used from backpacker destinations across Asia, Latin America and Africa. In doing so the book provides original insights into how backpacker tourism is highly significant for poverty alleviation and effective local development since it has strong linkages to the local economy, and less economic leakage than conventional tourism. Written by a leading academic in this area, this volume will be of interest to students of Tourism and Development Studies.
Posted in Business & Economics

The Urbanism of Exception

Author: Martin J. Murray

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107169240

Category: Social Science

Page: 434

View: 837

This book challenges the conventional understanding of cities not only as bounded spaces with coherence and integrity but also urbanization as a universal process along a linear pathway toward a common endpoint. The Urbanism of Exception argues that understanding global urbanism in the twenty-first century requires us to cast our gaze upon vast city-regions without a singular and dynamic urban core. Such areas are characterized by concentrated wealth, global connectivity, excess, and fantasy, on the one hand, and neglect, impoverishment, and deprivation, on the other. These extremes pull at cities, fragmenting urban landscapes into terrains of largely unequal and disconnected difference. While self-governing enclaves and planned utopian experiments with city building are certainly not new, what distinguishes the bewildering patchwork of such disconnected spaces is not only the sheer scale and scope of their effect on urban landscapes but also their association market-driven hyper-capitalism.
Posted in Social Science

Black Citymakers

How The Philadelphia Negro Changed Urban America

Author: Marcus Anthony Hunter

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199948135

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 8607

Black Citymakers revisits the Black Seventh Ward neighborhood and residents of W.E.B. DuBois's The Philadelphia Negro over the twentieth century. Hunter's analysis demonstrates that black Philadelphians were by not mere victims of large scale socio-economic and political change, but active participants influencing the direction of urban policy and change.
Posted in History

The Enclave Economy

Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico's Silicon Valley

Author: Kevin P. Gallagher, Lyuba Zarsky

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262262967

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 8961

Foreign investment has been widely perceived as a panacea for developing countries--as a way to reduce poverty and kick-start sustainable modern industries. The Enclave Economy calls this prescription into question, showing that Mexico's post-NAFTA experience of foreign direct investment in its information technology sector, particularly in the Guadalajara region, did not result in the expected benefits. Charting the rise and fall of Mexico's "Silicon Valley," the authors explore issues that resonate through much of Latin America and the developing world: the social, economic, and environmental effects of market-driven globalization. In the 1990s, Mexico was a poster child for globalization, throwing open its borders to trade and foreign investment, embracing NAFTA, and ending the government's role in strengthening domestic industry. But The Enclave Economy shows that although Mexico was initially successful in attracting multinational corporations, foreign investments waned in the absence of active government support and as China became increasingly competitive. Moreover, the authors find that foreign investment created an "enclave economy" the benefits of which were confined to an international sector not connected to the wider Mexican economy. In fact, foreign investment put many local IT firms out of business and transferred only limited amounts of environmentally sound technology. The authors suggest policies and strategies that will enable Mexico and other developing countries to foster foreign investment for sustainable development in the future. Kevin P. Gallagher is Assistant Professor of International Relations at Boston University and Senior Researcher at the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. He is the author of Free Trade and the Environment: Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond and other books. Lyuba Zarsky is a Consultant and Senior Research Fellow at the Global Development and Environment Institute. She is a contributing editor of Investment for Sustainable Development: Balancing Rights and Rewards.
Posted in Business & Economics

Urban Spaces

Planning and Struggles for Land and Community

Author: James Jennings,Julia Sheron Jordan-Zachery

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780739137444

Category: Political Science

Page: 154

View: 9204

Urban Spaces is an interdisciplinary reader focusing on community-based versus corporate-based political and ideological struggles over the utilization of urban land and spaces.
Posted in Political Science