Trace

Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape

Author: Lauret Savoy

Publisher: Counterpoint

ISBN: 1619026686

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 2302

Winner of the ASLE Creative Writing Award Winner of the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation Finalist for the PEN American Open Book Award Finalist for the Phillis Wheatley Book Award Shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing Shortlisted for the Orion Book Award "I stand in awe of Lauret Savoy's wisdom and compassionate intelligence. Trace is a crucial book for our time, a bound sanity, not a forgiveness, but a reckoning." ––Terry Tempest Williams Sand and stone are Earth's fragmented memory. Each of us, too, is a landscape inscribed by memory and loss. One life-defining lesson Lauret Savoy learned as a young girl was this: the American land did not hate. As an educator and Earth historian, she has tracked the continent’s past from the relics of deep time; but the paths of ancestors toward her—paths of free and enslaved Africans, colonists from Europe, and peoples indigenous to this land—lie largely eroded and lost. In this provocative and powerful mosaic of personal journeys and historical inquiry across a continent and time, Savoy explores how the country’s still unfolding history, and ideas of “race,” have marked her and the land. From twisted terrain within the San Andreas Fault zone to a South Carolina plantation, from national parks to burial grounds, from “Indian Territory” and the U.S.-Mexico Border to the U.S. capital, Trace grapples with a searing national history to reveal the often unvoiced presence of the past. In distinctive and illuminating prose that is attentive to the rhythms of language and landscapes, she weaves together human stories of migration, silence, and displacement, as epic as the continent they survey, with uplifted mountains, braided streams, and eroded canyons.
Posted in Social Science

The Colors of Nature

Culture, Identity, and the Natural World

Author: Alison Hawthorne Deming,Lauret E. Savoy

Publisher: Milkweed Editions

ISBN: 1571318143

Category: Nature

Page: 368

View: 1702

From African American to Asian American, indigenous to immigrant, "multiracial" to "mixedblood," the diversity of cultures in this world is matched only by the diversity of stories explaining our cultural origins: stories of creation and destruction, displacement and heartbreak, hope and mystery. With writing from Jamaica Kincaid on the fallacies of national myths, Yusef Komunyakaa connecting the toxic legacy of his hometown, Bogalusa, LA, to a blind faith in capitalism, and bell hooks relating the quashing of multiculturalism to the destruction of nature that is considered "unpredictable" — amongst more than 35 other examinations of the relationship between culture and nature — this collection points toward the trouble of ignoring our cultural heritage, but also reveals how opening our eyes and our minds might provide a more livable future. Contributors: Elmaz Abinader, Faith Adiele, Francisco X. Alarcón, Fred Arroyo, Kimberly Blaeser, Joseph Bruchac, Robert D. Bullard, Debra Kang Dean, Camille Dungy, Nikky Finney, Ray Gonzalez, Kimiko Hahn, bell hooks, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Pualani Kanaka‘ole Kanahele, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Jamaica Kincaid, Yusef Komunyakaa, J. Drew Lanham, David Mas Masumoto, Maria Melendez, Thyllias Moss, Gary Paul Nabhan, Nalini Nadkarni, Melissa Nelson, Jennifer Oladipo, Louis Owens, Enrique Salmon, Aileen Suzara, A. J. Verdelle, Gerald Vizenor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Al Young, Ofelia Zepeda
Posted in Nature

Race and Nature from Transcendentalism to the Harlem Renaissance

Author: P. Outka

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230614493

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 266

View: 2427

Drawing on theories of sublimity, trauma, and ecocriticism, this book examines how the often sharp division between European American and African American experiences of the natural world developed in American culture and history, and how those natural experiences, in turn, shaped the construction of race.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Alien Land

Author: Willard W. Savoy

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781555536572

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 6363

Action-packed and absorbing, a grim but sensitive picture of race and identity in America
Posted in Fiction

Rooted in the Earth

Reclaiming the African American Environmental Heritage

Author: Dianne D. Glave

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 156976753X

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 4621

With a basis in environmental history, this groundbreaking study challenges the idea that a meaningful attachment to nature and the outdoors is contrary to the black experience. The discussion shows that contemporary African American culture is usually seen as an urban culture, one that arose out of the Great Migration and has contributed to international trends in fashion, music, and the arts ever since. But because of this urban focus, many African Americans are not at peace with their rich but tangled agrarian legacy. On one hand, the book shows, nature and violence are connected in black memory, especially in disturbing images such as slave ships on the ocean, exhaustion in the fields, dogs in the woods, and dead bodies hanging from trees. In contrast, though, there is also a competing tradition of African American stewardship of the land that should be better known. Emphasizing the tradition of black environmentalism and using storytelling techniques to dramatize the work of black naturalists, this account corrects the record and urges interested urban dwellers to get back to the land.
Posted in History

Black Nature

Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry

Author: Camille T. Dungy

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820332771

Category: Poetry

Page: 387

View: 5857

Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated. Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry--anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild. Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements. Black Nature brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole. A Friends Fund Publication.
Posted in Poetry

To Love the Wind and the Rain

African Americans and Environmental History

Author: Dianne D. Glave,Mark Stoll

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 0822972905

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 6847

An analysis of the relationship between African Americans and the environment focuses on three major themes: African Americans in the rural environment, African Americans in the urban and suburban environments, and African Americans and the notion of environmental justice.
Posted in Social Science

My Work Is That of Conservation

An Environmental Biography of George Washington Carver

Author: Mark D. Hersey

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820339652

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 3217

George Washington Carver (ca. 1864-1943) is at once one of the most familiar and misunderstood figures in American history. In My Work Is That of Conservation, Mark D. Hersey reveals the life and work of this fascinating man who is widely--and reductively--known as the African American scientist who developed a wide variety of uses for the peanut. Carver had a truly prolific career dedicated to studying the ways in which people ought to interact with the natural world, yet much of his work has been largely forgotten. Hersey rectifies this by tracing the evolution of Carver's agricultural and environmental thought starting with his childhood in Missouri and Kansas and his education at the Iowa Agricultural College. Carver's environmental vision came into focus when he moved to the Tuskegee Institute in Macon County, Alabama, where his sensibilities and training collided with the denuded agrosystems, deep poverty, and institutional racism of the Black Belt. It was there that Carver realized his most profound agricultural thinking, as his efforts to improve the lot of the area's poorest farmers forced him to adjust his conception of scientific agriculture. Hersey shows that in the hands of pioneers like Carver, Progressive Era agronomy was actually considerably "greener" than is often thought today. My Work Is That of Conservation uses Carver's life story to explore aspects of southern environmental history and to place this important scientist within the early conservation movement.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Bedrock

Writers on the Wonders of Geology

Author: Lauret E. Savoy,Eldridge M. Moores,Judith E. Moores

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781595340221

Category: Science

Page: 339

View: 7875

Novelists, poets, artists, anthropologists, traditional elders, philosophers, and naturalists come together to create a geological portrait of the Earth — from the violence of earthquakes and erupting volcanoes to epochal patterns in stone and the sinuous flow of rivers. With insights from many cultures and across time, Bedrock wonderfully illuminates the geology of our home planet. The book is organized into sections that deal with rock and stone; deep time; earthquakes and faults; volcanoes and eruptions; rivers to the sea; mountains and high¬lands; wind and desert; the flow of ice; and the life of the Earth. Insightful, penetrating, and provocative, the works are written from many positions — traditional and indigenous as well as Western scientific. Bedrock bridges specialized science and ordinary existence, providing a fascinating portrait of the forces that have shaped the Earth and giving readers a sense of the geologic experience encompassing their lives.
Posted in Science

Black Faces, White Spaces

Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

Author: Carolyn Finney

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469614480

Category: Nature

Page: 194

View: 1782

Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors
Posted in Nature

African American Environmental Thought

Foundations

Author: Kimberly K. Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 257

View: 1985

Examines the works of Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, and several other canonical figures, to uncover a rich and vital tradition of black environmental thought from the abolition movement through the Harlem Renaissance. Provides the first careful linkage of the early conservation movement to black history, the first detailed description of black agrarianism, and the first analysis of scientific racism as an environmental theory.
Posted in Nature

National Parks Beyond the Nation

Global Perspectives on "America's Best Idea"

Author: Adrian Howkins,Jared Orsi,Mark Fiege

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806154756

Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Page: N.A

View: 3694

"National Parks beyond the Nation brings together the work of fifteen scholars and writers to reveal the tremendous diversity of the global national park experience--an experience sometimes influencing, sometimes influenced by, and sometimes with no reference whatever to the United States. They explore the historical interactions and influences--intellectual, political, and material--within and between national park systems in Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, Indonesia, Antarctica, Brazil, and other countries"--Provided by publisher.
Posted in BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Living with the Changing California Coast

Author: Gary B. Griggs,Kiki Patsch,Lauret E. Savoy

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520244474

Category: Nature

Page: 540

View: 8003

"The goal of The Changing California Coast is to provide perspective on the realities of living on the California coast, its challenges and issues, and the nitty gritty of what to consider before buying or building a house. The book achieves this aim by providing a tutorial on the potential hazards of coastal living, and systematically covering the coast from border to border. A must read for anyone whose idea of the coast is based on too many episodes of Baywatch."--Paul D. Komar, author of Beach Processes and Sedimentation "California's coast is a living landscape endlessly besieged by waves and tides, upland erosion, seismic forces, and human efforts to secure land's edge in place. A geography of awesome beauty and constant conflict, the coast is where people want to be. Living with the Changing California Coast is a must read for property owners, developers, investors, public officials, and activists who care about our coast's future. This book lays out the consequences of our tendency to wall up the coast and what we might do to reverse the trend. A most thorough, alarming and compelling tale of what is happening to our shoreline. Will policy makers listen?"--Peter Douglas, Executive Director of the California Coastal Commission
Posted in Nature

The Hour of Land

A Personal Topography of America's National Parks

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 0374712263

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 7651

America’s national parks are breathing spaces in a world in which such spaces are steadily disappearing, which is why more than 300 million people visit the parks each year. Now Terry Tempest Williams, the author of the environmental classic Refuge and the beloved memoir When Women Were Birds, returns with The Hour of Land, a literary celebration of our national parks, an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them. From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas and more, Williams creates a series of lyrical portraits that illuminate the unique grandeur of each place while delving into what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America.
Posted in Nature

Toward a Sociology of the Trace

Author: Herman Gray,Macarena Gómez-Barris

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816655979

Category: Social Science

Page: 308

View: 4871

Questions national identity by investigating the creation of memory and meaning.
Posted in Social Science

Same Sex Love 1700-1957

A History and Research Guide

Author: Gill Rossini

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473854245

Category: Psychology

Page: 176

View: 1666

Family history is often seen as the stories of people who were part of a traditional family unit, married to someone of the opposite gender, had children and lived their lives as 'normally' as possible. But what of the relatives who could not accept that this was the life for them, and were attracted to same-sex partners? Was it possible for them to live their life as they wished to, with their chosen partner and without hindrance, ridicule or attack? Would they be breaking the law in doing so, and how would family and society react if they were found out? Some of those concerned married and had children, like the majority, and buried their feelings in the bustle of everyday life; others stayed single but abstained from relationships altogether, as a way of keeping safe. A number managed to live openly and proudly as themselves, challenging the prejudices and misconceptions of the day. This is the story of all those people, the brave, the discreet, the frightened, the loving and the loved, as well as love against all the odds; more than likely, it is a story that can be found in every family history. Told in an empathetic and clear-sighted way, this is the first history of same-sex relationships aimed specifically at family historians and offers valuable insights into the lives of those who were often seen as outcasts. It includes research guidance for genealogists researching this often-neglected aspect of family history, and offers invaluable insights into the families, society and culture they lived in.
Posted in Psychology

Project Puffin

The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to Egg Rock

Author: Stephen W. Kress,Derrick Z. Jackson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300204817

Category: Nature

Page: 376

View: 9358

The inspiring story of a young ornithologist who reintroduced puffins where none had been seen for a century
Posted in Nature

The Home Place

Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature

Author: J. Drew Lanham

Publisher: Milkweed Editions

ISBN: 1571318755

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 232

View: 1626

“In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. All of these hues are me; I am, in the deepest sense, colored.” From these fertile soils of love, land, identity, family, and race emerges The Home Place, a big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist and professor of ecology J. Drew Lanham. Dating back to slavery, Edgefield County, South Carolina—a place “easy to pass by on the way somewhere else”—has been home to generations of Lanhams. In The Home Place, readers meet these extraordinary people, including Drew himself, who over the course of the 1970s falls in love with the natural world around him. As his passion takes flight, however, he begins to ask what it means to be “the rare bird, the oddity.” By turns angry, funny, elegiac, and heartbreaking, The Home Place is a remarkable meditation on nature and belonging, at once a deeply moving memoir and riveting exploration of the contradictions of black identity in the rural South—and in America today.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Rise of the American Conservation Movement

Power, Privilege, and Environmental Protection

Author: Dorceta E. Taylor

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373971

Category: Nature

Page: 496

View: 3939

In this sweeping social history Dorceta E. Taylor examines the emergence and rise of the multifaceted U.S. conservation movement from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century. She shows how race, class, and gender influenced every aspect of the movement, including the establishment of parks; campaigns to protect wild game, birds, and fish; forest conservation; outdoor recreation; and the movement's links to nineteenth-century ideologies. Initially led by white urban elites—whose early efforts discriminated against the lower class and were often tied up with slavery and the appropriation of Native lands—the movement benefited from contributions to policy making, knowledge about the environment, and activism by the poor and working class, people of color, women, and Native Americans. Far-ranging and nuanced, The Rise of the American Conservation Movement comprehensively documents the movement's competing motivations, conflicts, problematic practices, and achievements in new ways.
Posted in Nature

The Adventure Gap

Changing the Face of the Outdoors

Author: James Edward Mills

Publisher: Mountaineers Books

ISBN: 1594858691

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 6908

• Chronicles the first all-African American summit attempt on Denali, the highest point in North America • Part adventure story, part history, and part argument for the importance of inspiring future generations to value nature The nation’s wild places—from national and state parks to national forests, preserves, and wilderness areas—belong to all Americans. But not all of us use these resources equally. Minority populations are much less likely to seek recreation, adventure, and solace in our wilderness spaces. It’s a difference that African American author James Mills addresses in his new book, The Adventure Gap: Changing the Face of the Outdoors. Bridging the so-called “adventure gap” requires role models who can inspire the uninitiated to experience and enjoy wild places. Once new visitors are there, a love affair often follows. This is important because as our country grows increasingly multicultural, our natural legacy will need the devotion of people of all races and ethnicities to steward its care. In 2013, the first all-African American team of climbers, sponsored by the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), challenged themselves on North America’s highest point, the dangerous and forbidding Denali, in Alaska. Mills uses Expedition Denali and its team members’ adventures as a jumping-off point to explore how minority populations view their place in wild environments and to share the stories of those who have already achieved significant accomplishments in outdoor adventures—from Mathew Henson, a Black explorer who stood with Peary at the North Pole, to Kai Lightner, a teenage sport climber currently winning national competitions. The goal of the expedition, and now the book, is to inspire minority communities to look outdoors for experiences that will enrich their lives, and to encourage them toward greater environmental stewardship.
Posted in Sports & Recreation