The Violence of Incarceration

Author: Phil Scraton,Jude McCulloch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135894337

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 7940

Conceived in the immediate aftermath of the humiliations and killings of prisoners in Afghanistan and Iraq, of the suicides and hunger strikes at Guantanamo Bay and of the disappearances of detainees through extraordinary rendition, this book explores the connections between these shameful events and the inhumanity and degradation of domestic prisons within the 'allied' states, including the USA, Canada, Australia, the UK and Ireland. The central theme is that the revelations of extreme brutality perpetrated by allied soldiers represent the inevitable end-product of domestic incarceration predicated on the use of extreme violence including lethal force. Exposing as fiction the claim to the political moral high ground made by western liberal democracies is critical because such claims animate and legitimate global actions such as the 'war on terror' and the indefinite detention of tens of thousands of people by the United States which accompanies it. The myth of moral virtue works to hide, silence, minimize and deny the brutal continuing history of violence and incarceration both within western countries and undertaken on behalf of western states beyond their national borders.
Posted in Social Science

Prison Violence

Causes, Consequences and Solutions

Author: Dr Kristine Levan

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409471772

Category: Social Science

Page: 166

View: 559

Drawing on a range of research and media sources to provide an international perspective on the topic of prison violence, this book focuses on the impact of such violence on the individual both while he or she is incarcerated and upon his or her release from prison, as well as on society as a whole. With a special emphasis on comparisons of violence among incarcerated populations in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, Prison Violence: Causes, Consequences and Solutions explores the various systems that exist to combat the problem, whilst also considering public perceptions of offenders and punishment, as influenced by media and coverage of high-profile cases. Providing a comprehensive analysis of prison violence on national and international levels, this book examines the extent of the problem, theoretical understandings of the issue and concrete solutions designed to prevent and handle such violence. As such, it will be of interest to policy makers as well as scholars of sociology, criminology and penology.
Posted in Social Science

The Culture of Prison Violence

Author: James Michael Byrne,Faye S. Taxman,Donald Charles Hummer

Publisher: Allyn & Bacon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 219

View: 8217

The nature and extent of prison violence / James M. Byrne, Don Hummer -- Does what happens in prison stay in prison? : examining the reciprocal relationship between community and prison culture / Jacob I. Stowell, James M. Byrne -- Examining the impact of institutional culture (and culture change) on prison violence and disorder : an evidence-based review / James Byrne, Don Hummer, Faye Taxman -- Legitimacy and imprisonment revisited : some notes on the problem of order ten years after / Richard Sparks -- Why prison culture matters / Alison Liebling -- Performance, domesticity, and disorder : the communicative quality of prison violence / Elaine Crawley, Peter Crawley -- The impact of prison culture on the treatment and control of mentally ill offenders / Arthur J. Lurigio, Jessica Snowden -- A culture of violence in England's prison system : an assessment of causes and solutions / Kimmitt Edgar, Prison Reform Trust -- Prison violence, prison culture, and offender change : new directions for theory, research, and policy / James M. Byrne
Posted in Law

The Incarceration of Women

Punishing Bodies, Breaking Spirits

Author: L. Moore,P. Scraton

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137317841

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 9090

This unique book provides a rare insight into the debilitating impact of regimes that fail to respond to the complex and gender specific needs of women behind bars. Exploring the marginalization, mental health and experiences of women in prison, it specifically focuses on the legacy of women's imprisonment in Northern Ireland.
Posted in Social Science

Experiencing Imprisonment

Research on the experience of living and working in carceral institutions

Author: Carla Reeves

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317653491

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

View: 4130

The growing body of work on imprisonment, desistance and rehabilitation has mainly focused on policies and treatment programmes and how they are delivered. Experiencing Imprisonment reflects recent developments in research that focus on the active role of the offender in the process of justice. Bringing together experts from around the world and presenting a range of comparative critical research relating to key themes of the pains of imprisonment, stigma, power and vulnerability, this book explores the various ways in which offenders relate to the justice systems and how these relationships impact the nature and effectiveness of their efforts to reduce offending. Experiencing Imprisonment showcases cutting-edge international and comparative critical research on how imprisonment is experienced by those people living and working within imprisonment institutions in North America and Northern, Central and Eastern Europe, as well as Scandinavia. The research explores the subjective experience of imprisonment from the perspective of a variety of staff and prisoner groups, including juveniles, adult female and male prisoners, older prisoners, sex offenders, wrongfully convicted offenders and newly released prisoners. Offering a unique view of what it is like to be a prisoner or a prison officer, the chapters in this book argue for a prioritisation of understanding the subjective experiences of imprisonment as essential to developing effective and humane systems of punishment. This is essential reading for academics and students involved in the study of criminology, penology and the sociology of imprisonment. It will also be of interest to Criminal Justice practitioners and policymakers around the globe.
Posted in Social Science

Locked In

The True Causes of Mass Incarceration—and How to Achieve Real Reform

Author: John Pfaff

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465096921

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 8118

"Pfaff, let there be no doubt, is a reformer...Nonetheless, he believes that the standard story--popularized in particular by Michelle Alexander, in her influential book, The New Jim Crow--is false. We are desperately in need of reform, he insists, but we must reform the right things, and address the true problem."--Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker A groundbreaking examination of our system of imprisonment, revealing the true causes of mass incarceration as well as the best path to reform In the 1970s, the United States had an incarceration rate comparable to those of other liberal democracies-and that rate had held steady for over 100 years. Yet today, though the US is home to only about 5 percent of the world's population, we hold nearly one quarter of its prisoners. Mass incarceration is now widely considered one of the biggest social and political crises of our age. How did we get to this point? Locked In is a revelatory investigation into the root causes of mass incarceration by one of the most exciting scholars in the country. Having spent fifteen years studying the data on imprisonment, John Pfaff takes apart the reigning consensus created by Michelle Alexander and other reformers, revealing that the most widely accepted explanations-the failed War on Drugs, draconian sentencing laws, an increasing reliance on private prisons-tell us much less than we think. Pfaff urges us to look at other factors instead, including a major shift in prosecutor behavior that occurred in the mid-1990s, when prosecutors began bringing felony charges against arrestees about twice as often as they had before. He describes a fractured criminal justice system, in which counties don't pay for the people they send to state prisons, and in which white suburbs set law and order agendas for more-heavily minority cities. And he shows that if we hope to significantly reduce prison populations, we have no choice but to think differently about how to deal with people convicted of violent crimes-and why some people are violent in the first place. An authoritative, clear-eyed account of a national catastrophe, Locked In transforms our understanding of what ails the American system of punishment and ultimately forces us to reconsider how we can build a more equitable and humane society.
Posted in Social Science

Genocidal Democracy

Neoliberalism, Mass Incarceration, and the Politics of Urban Gun Violence

Author: John D. Marquez

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781138804388

Category: Law

Page: 208

View: 6937

Over the past three decades, the rate at which blacks and Latinos/as murder, or are murdered, by one another in the United States has increased exponentially. Social scientists have generally argued that this 'ghetto violence' is but one consequence of deindustrialization and the systematic exclusion of black and Latino/a families from the middle class. But this book problematizes the assumption that middle class assimilation or economic inclusion can provide a remedy to ghetto violence. To this end, it identifies two primary issues. The first is that the subaltern is most commonly represented as an artifact of victimization, and so as a group who cannot escape their own chaos, pathology, or savagery. Second, middle class inclusion is prescribed as a remedy for ghetto violence without a deeper consideration of how the very idea of the middle class and its 'values' has been produced in opposition to the very groups to whom the extension of these values is proposed. Against this background, Genocidal Democracy locates the origins of ghetto violence within the racial and colonial architecture of European modernity. And as such, it argues, this violence must find its remedy outside of a modern, liberal, and capitalist state apparatus which - according to this legacy - continues to promote the idea that groups like blacks and Latinos/as are either a burden or a threat to the body politic.
Posted in Law

Arrested Justice

Black Women, Violence, and America’s Prison Nation

Author: Beth E. Richie

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814708226

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 4665

Black women in marginalized communities are uniquely at risk of battering, rape, sexual harassment, stalking and incest. Through the compelling stories of Black women who have been most affected by racism, persistent poverty, class inequality, limited access to support resources or institutions, Beth E. Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstrating how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the U.S.-based movement to end violence against women. Richie argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result, the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women, the various forms it takes, and the contexts within which it occurs are minimized—at best—and frequently ignored. Arrested Justice brings issues of sexuality, class, age, and criminalization into focus right alongside of questions of public policy and gender violence, resulting in a compelling critique, a passionate re-framing of stories, and a call to action for change.
Posted in Social Science

After Life Imprisonment

Reentry in the Era of Mass Incarceration

Author: Marieke Liem

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479813265

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 6684

One out of every ten prisoners in the United States is serving a life sentence—roughly 130,000 people. While some have been sentenced to life in prison without parole, the majority of prisoners serving ‘life’ will be released back into society. But what becomes of those people who reenter the everyday world after serving life in prison? In After Life Imprisonment, Marieke Liem carefully examines the experiences of “lifers” upon release. Through interviews with over sixty homicide offenders sentenced to life but granted parole, Liem tracks those able to build a new life on the outside and those who were re-incarcerated. The interviews reveal prisoners’ reflections on being sentenced to life, as well as the challenges of employment, housing, and interpersonal relationships upon release. Liem explores the increase in handing out of life sentences, and specifically provides a basis for discussions of the goals, costs, and effects of long-term imprisonment, ultimately unpacking public policy and discourse surrounding long-term incarceration. A profound criminological examination, After Life Imprisonment reveals the untold, lived experiences of prisoners before and after their life sentences.
Posted in Social Science

Women, Mobility and Incarceration

Love and Recasting of Self across the Bangladesh-India Border

Author: Rimple Mehta

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 135170835X

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 6700

This book explores how Bangladeshi women from poor and undereducated/semi-educated backgrounds who have crossed the Indo-Bangladesh border find themselves in prisons serving sentences under the Foreigners Act, 1946. Drawing on original fieldwork, this book explores these women’s understanding of borders and state sovereignty and how the women - from conservative rural and semi-rural backgrounds which impose a strict moral code - adjust to the socio-cultural context of an Indian prison, where being an inmate is "dishonourable" in their community. This book examines the implicit challenge in these women’s action and decisions to these codes of honour, to accepted social norms of their religion and community, and ultimately, the dominantly patriarchal system that marks South Asian society. Further, it focuses on the negotiations that the Bangladeshi women make with the social and political borders they encounter in the process of crossing the Indo-Bangladesh border without requisite documents needed by the state for entry into a "foreign" land; how they cope with the daily challenges of living during their imprisonment in a correctional home; and their feelings about their impending return to Bangladesh. Women who are apprehended and criminalised for crossing borders must negotiate with not only the normative understanding of borders which is inherently masculine in nature, but also the gender biased lens through which female mobility is viewed: therefore, they not only cross political borders but also social borders. This book maps the associations between women’s experiences of mobility and incarceration, and their linkages with social and political borders and the fraught experiences of being in a ‘foreign’ territorial space. It will be important reading for criminologists, sociologists, and those engaged in penology, women’s studies and migration studies.
Posted in Social Science

Rethinking the American Prison Movement

Author: Dan Berger,Toussaint Losier

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317662229

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 6939

Rethinking the American Prison Movement provides a short, accessible overview of the transformational and ongoing struggles against America’s prison system. Dan Berger and Toussaint Losier show that prisoners have used strikes, lawsuits, uprisings, writings, and diverse coalitions with free-world allies to challenge prison conditions and other kinds of inequality. From the forced labor camps of the nineteenth century to the rebellious protests of the 1960s and 1970s to the rise of mass incarceration and its discontents, Rethinking the American Prison Movement is invaluable to anyone interested in the history of American prisons and the struggles for justice still echoing in the present day.
Posted in History

Legal Violence and the Limits of the Law

Cruel and Unusual

Author: Amy Swiffen,Joshua Nichols

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317602102

Category: Law

Page: 192

View: 4677

What is the meaning of punishment today? Where is the limit that separates it from the cruel and unusual? In legal discourse, the distinction between punishment and vengeance—punishment being the measured use of legally sanctioned violence and vengeance being a use of violence that has no measure—is expressed by the idea of "cruel and unusual punishment." This phrase was originally contained in the English Bill of Rights (1689). But it (and versions of it) has since found its way into numerous constitutions and declarations, including Article 5 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as the Amendment to the US Constitution. Clearly, in order for the use of violence to be legitimate, it must be subject to limitation. The difficulty is that the determination of this limit should be objective, but it is not, and its application in punitive practice is constituted by a host of extra-legal factors and social and political structures. It is this essential contestability of the limit which distinguishes punishment from violence that this book addresses. And, including contributions from a range of internationally renowned scholars, it offers a plurality of original and important responses to the contemporary question of the relationship between punishment and the limits of law.
Posted in Law

America's Jails

The Search for Human Dignity in an Age of Mass Incarceration

Author: Derek Jeffreys

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479838624

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 8547

A look at the contemporary crisis in U.S. jails with recommendations for improving and protecting the dignity of inmates Twelve million Americans go through the U.S. jail system on an annual basis. Jails, which differ significantly from prisons, are designed to house inmates for short amounts of time, and are often occupied by large populations of legally innocent people waiting for a trial. Jails often have deplorable sanitary conditions, and there are countless records of inmates being brutalized by staff and other inmates while in custody. Local municipalities use jails to institutionalize those whom they perceive to be a threat, so hundreds of thousands of inmates suffer from mental illness. People abandoned by families or lacking health insurance, or those who cannot afford bail, often cycle in and out of jails. In America’s Jails, Derek Jeffreys draws on sociology, philosophy, history, and his personal experience volunteering in jails and prisons to provide an understanding of the jail experience from the inmates’ perspective, focusing on the stigma that surrounds incarceration. Using his research at Cook County Jail, the nation’s largest single-site jail, Jeffreys attests that jail inmates possess an inherent dignity that should govern how we treat them. Ultimately, fundamental changes in the U.S. jail system are necessary and America’s Jails provides specific policy recommendations for changing its poor conditions. Highlighting the experiences of inmates themselves, America’s Jails aims to shift public perception and understanding of jail inmates to center their inherent dignity and help eliminate the stigma attached to their incarceration.
Posted in Social Science

Surviving Incarceration

Inside Canadian Prisons

Author: Rose Ricciardelli

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 177112055X

Category: Social Science

Page: 250

View: 851

Is prison a humane form of punishment and an effective means of rehabilitation? Are current prison policies, such as shifting resources away from rehabilitation toward housing more offenders, improving the safety and lives of incarcerated populations? Considering that many Canadians have served time, are currently incarcerated, or may one day be incarcerated–and will be released back into society–it is essential for the functioning and betterment of communities that we understand the realities that shape the prison experience for adult male offenders. Surviving Incarceration reveals the unnecessary and omnipresent violence in prisons, the heterogeneity of the prisoner population, and the realities that different prisoners navigate in order to survive. Ricciardelli draws on interviews with almost sixty former federal prisoners to show how their criminal convictions, masculinity, and sexuality determined their social status in prison and, in consequence, their potential for victimization. The book outlines the modern "inmate code" that governs prisoner behaviours, the formal controls put forth by the administration, the dynamics that shape sex-offender experiences of incarceration, and the personal growth experiences of many prisoners as they cope with incarceration.
Posted in Social Science

The Violence of Democracy

Political Life in Postwar El Salvador

Author: Ainhoa Montoya

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331976330X

Category: Political Science

Page: 303

View: 7591

This book offers novel insights about the ability of a democracy to accommodate violence. In El Salvador, the end of war has brought about a violent peace, one in which various forms of violence have become incorporated into Salvadorans’ imaginaries and enactments of democracy. Based on ethnographic research, The Violence of Democracy argues that war legacies and the country’s neoliberalization have enabled an intricate entanglement of violence and political life in postwar El Salvador. This volume explores various manifestations of this entanglement: the clandestine connections between violent entrepreneurs and political actors; the blurring of the licit and illicit through the consolidation of economies of violence; and the reenactment of latent wartime conflicts and political cleavages during postwar electoral seasons. The author also discusses the potential for grassroots memory work and a political party shift to foster hopeful visions of the future and, ultimately, to transform the country’s violent democracy.
Posted in Political Science

Crime and Punishment in America

Author: Elliott Currie

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250024218

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 877

An acclaimed criminologist examines America's ongoing war against violent crime, arguing that ever-increasing rates of imprisonment have not reduced--and will not reduce--crime rates and offering a range of tested alternatives based on deterrence. Tour.
Posted in Political Science

When You Have to Go to Prison

A Complete Guide for You and Your Family

Author: Margaret R. Kohut

Publisher: Atlantic Publishing Company

ISBN: 1601383851

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 288

View: 8414

The number of people incarcerated across the United States reached two million in 2002. That number has increased since then, and the U.S. holds the highest incarceration rate in the world - one out of every 100 Americans are in prison. The rate of imprisoned females is rising at a faster rate than imprisoned males, and many individuals are imprisoned for non-violent crimes. Individuals with otherwise respectable lives are incarcerated with little or no idea of what to expect and how it will affect them and their families. This book was written to help anyone who is preparing to go to prison with the possibilities, expectations, and realities of their situation from the strain it will put on a marriage, to the conversations you will need to have with your children. You will learn everything you need to know about prison that the system is unwilling to tell you. Learn how visitation works and how often you will be able to see your family. Learn how to discuss prison with your children and how to maintain a healthy relationship with your spouse regardless of the duration of your incarceration. Learn about the unique issues women go through in prison. Learn how to write a loving letter and how to effectively bide your time in prison without succumbing to the temptations and bad influences. Learn how to maintain your dignity and the respect of your children despite everything that has happened, by consistently keeping in touch. After interviewing more than 100 past and present inmates along with their families, this book provides a complete perspective into how people respond to the prospect and reality of incarceration, and what you can do to prepare for those realities. Learn what prison life is really like depending on your crime and where you will be sent. Learn how you can reduce your prison time through good behavior and how you can: prepare your family for your departure, prepare your finances, ensure friends or family members will help your spouse, and set aside the necessary resources to maintain your family's lifestyle and comfort. For anyone preparing to go to prison and leaving behind a family, this book will provide the necessary information that no one else is willing to tell you before you go in. Atlantic Publishing is a small, independent publishing company based in Ocala, Florida. Founded over twenty years ago in the company presidentâe(tm)s garage, Atlantic Publishing has grown to become a renowned resource for non-fiction books. Today, over 450 titles are in print covering subjects such as small business, healthy living, management, finance, careers, and real estate. Atlantic Publishing prides itself on producing award winning, high-quality manuals that give readers up-to-date, pertinent information, real-world examples, and case studies with expert advice. Every book has resources, contact information, and web sites of the products or companies discussed.
Posted in Family & Relationships

The violence of the new Rwandan regime 1994-1995

Author: Laurence Binet

Publisher: Médecins Sans Frontières

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 144

View: 5649

The ‘Violence of the new Rwandan regime’ case study is describing the difficulties and dilemmas that Médecins Sans Frontières faced in 1994 and 1995 when confronted with the abuses and crimes of the new regime that had taken over in Rwanda in July 1994: Was it acceptable for MSF, having denounced the génocidaires’control over the Rwandan refugees in Zaire and Tanzania, to encourage the return of these refugees to Rwanda, given the insecurity that potentially awaited them? Did MSF have a responsibility to alert them to what was occurring in Rwanda? Could MSF – after having issued a call for an international armed intervention to put an end to the genocide – now criticise the regime that had effectively done so, thereby risking accusations of favouring the génocidaires and supporting the revisionists? Should MSF keep silent in order to continue caring for detainees who might otherwise die in the appalling prison conditions?
Posted in

Sharing This Walk

An Ethnography of Prison Life and the PCC in Brazil

Author: Karina Biondi

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469630311

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 8033

The Primeiro Comando do Capital (PCC) is a Sao Paulo prison gang that since the 1990s has expanded into the most powerful criminal network in Brazil. Karina Biondi's rich ethnography of the PCC is uniquely informed by her insider-outsider status. Prior to his acquittal, Biondi's husband was incarcerated in a PCC-dominated prison for several years. During the period of Biondi's intense and intimate visits with her husband and her extensive fieldwork in prisons and on the streets of Sao Paulo, the PCC effectively controlled more than 90 percent of Sao Paulo's 147 prison facilities. Available for the first time in English, Biondi's riveting portrait of the PCC illuminates how the organization operates inside and outside of prison, creatively elaborating on a decentered, non-hierarchical, and far-reaching command system. This system challenges both the police forces against which the PCC has declared war and the methods and analytic concepts traditionally employed by social scientists concerned with crime, incarceration, and policing. Biondi posits that the PCC embodies a "politics of transcendence," a group identity that is braided together with, but also autonomous from, its decentralized parts. Biondi also situates the PCC in relation to redemocratization and rampant socioeconomic inequality in Brazil, as well as to counter-state movements, crime, and punishment in the Americas.
Posted in History

Death and Other Penalties

Philosophy in a Time of Mass Incarceration

Author: Geoffrey Adelsberg

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0823265293

Category: Law

Page: 424

View: 1779

Mass incarceration is one of the most pressing ethical and political issues of our time. In this volume, philosophers join activists and those incarcerated on death row to grapple with contemporary U.S. punishment practices and draw out critiques around questions of power, identity, justice, and ethical responsibility. This work takes shape against a backdrop of disturbing trends: The United States incarcerates more of its own citizens than any other country in the world. A disproportionate number of these prisoners are people of color, and, today, a black man has a greater chance of going to prison than to college. The United States is the only Western democracy to retain the death penalty, even after decades of scholarship, statistics, and even legal decisions have depicted a deeply flawed system structured by racism and class oppression. Motivated by a conviction that mass incarceration and state execution are among the most important ethical and political problems of our time, the contributors to this volume come together from a diverse range of backgrounds to analyze, critique, and envision alternatives to the injustices of the U.S. prison system, with recourse to deconstruction, phenomenology, critical race theory, feminism, queer theory, and disability studies. They engage with the hyper-incarceration of people of color, the incomplete abolition of slavery, the exploitation of prisoners as workers and as "raw material" for the prison industrial complex, the intensive confinement of prisoners in supermax units, and the complexities of capital punishment in an age of abolition. The resulting collection contributes to a growing intellectual and political resistance to the apparent inevitability of incarceration and state execution as responses to crime and to social inequalities. It addresses both philosophers and activists who seek intellectual resources to contest the injustices of punishment in the United States.
Posted in Law