The Utopian Impulse in Latin America

Author: K. Beauchesne,A. Santos

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230339611

Category: Social Science

Page: 307

View: 7507

An exploration of the concept of utopia in Latin America from the earliest accounts of the New World to current cultural production, the carefully selected essays in this volume represent the latest research on the topic by some of the most important Latin Americanists working in North American academia today.
Posted in Social Science

Performing Utopias in the Contemporary Americas

Author: Kim Beauchesne,Alessandra Santos

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137568739

Category: Social Science

Page: 323

View: 3377

This book offers an innovative examination of the utopian impulse through performance as a proposition of practical engagement in the contemporary Americas. The volume compiles unique multidisciplinary and exploratory texts, applying diverse critical and artistic approaches. Its contributors reconceptualize utopia as a creative and theoretical method based on a commitment to sociopolitical transformation. Chapters are organized around notions of mapping utopias, indigenizing practices, political manifestations, and the construction of social identities.
Posted in Social Science

Children on the Threshold in Contemporary Latin American Cinema

Nature, Gender, and Agency

Author: Rachel Randall

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1498555144

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 6673

This book contends that child characters have taken on a critical representational role within Latin American cinema because of their position on the threshold between “nature” and “culture,” which converts them into a focus of, and a limit to, state or colonial biopower.
Posted in History

Latin America at Fin-de-Siècle Universal Exhibitions

Modern Cultures of Visuality

Author: Alejandra Uslenghi

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137553960

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 6689

Spanning from the 1876 exposition in Philadelphia, through Paris 1889, and culminating in Paris 1900, this book examines how Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico forged the image of a modernizing Latin America at the moment of their insertion into the new visual economy of capitalism, as well as how their modern writers experienced and narrated these events by introducing new literary forms and modernizing literary language. Following these itineraries overseas and back, Uslenghi illuminates the contested, political, and transformative relations that emerged as images and material culture travelled from sites of production to those of exhibition, exchange, and consumption.
Posted in Social Science

Performing Utopias in the Contemporary Americas

Author: Kim Beauchesne,Alessandra Santos

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137568739

Category: Social Science

Page: 323

View: 8629

This book offers an innovative examination of the utopian impulse through performance as a proposition of practical engagement in the contemporary Americas. The volume compiles unique multidisciplinary and exploratory texts, applying diverse critical and artistic approaches. Its contributors reconceptualize utopia as a creative and theoretical method based on a commitment to sociopolitical transformation. Chapters are organized around notions of mapping utopias, indigenizing practices, political manifestations, and the construction of social identities.
Posted in Social Science

José Martí

Images of Memory and Mourning

Author: E. Bejel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113712265X

Category: Political Science

Page: 163

View: 1316

This book is a critical study of visual representations of José Martí The National Hero of Cuba , and the discourses of power that make it possible for Martí's images to be perceived as icons today. It argues that an observer of Martí's icons who is immersed in the Cuban national narrative experiences a retrospective reconstruction of those images by means of ideologically formed national discourses of power. Also, the obsessive reproduction of Martí's icons signals a melancholia for the loss of the martyr-hero. But instead of attempting to "forget Martí," the book concludes that the utopian impulse of his memory should serve to resist melancholia and to visualize new forms of creative re-significations of Martí and, by extension, the nation.
Posted in Political Science

Inverted Utopias

Avant-garde Art in Latin America

Author: Mari Carmen Ramírez,Héctor Olea

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300102690

Category: Art

Page: 586

View: 6499

In the twentieth century, avant-garde artists from Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean created extraordinary and highly innovative paintings, sculptures, assemblages, mixed-media works, and installations. This innovative book presents more than 250 works by some seventy of these artists (including Gego, Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Xul Solar, and Jose Clemente Orozco) and artists' groups, along with interpretive essays by leading authorities and newly translated manifestoes and other theoretical documents written by the artists. Together the images and texts showcase the astonishing artistic achievements of the Latin American avant-garde. The book focuses on two decisive periods: the return from Europe in the 1920s of Latin American avant-garde pioneers; and the expansion of avant-garde activities throughout Latin America after World War II as artists expressed their independence from developments in Europe and the United States. As the authors explain, during these periods Latin American art was fueled by the belief that artistic creations could present a form of utopia - an inversion of the original premise that drove the European avant-garde - and serve as a model for
Posted in Art

Reality and Its Dreams

Author: Raymond Geuss

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674968956

Category: Philosophy

Page: 312

View: 5068

One of political philosophy’s most trenchant and inventive critics challenges the field’s normative turn, arguing that the study of politics should focus on real politics, where normative judgments arise from concrete configurations of power. Raymond Geuss shows how this can be done without succumbing to a toxic relativism or abandoning utopianism.
Posted in Philosophy

Theorizing Race in the Americas

Douglass, Sarmiento, Du Bois, and Vasconcelos

Author: Juliet Hooker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190633697

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 2059

In 1845 two thinkers from the American hemisphere - the Argentinean statesman Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, and the fugitive ex-slave, abolitionist leader, and orator from the United States, Frederick Douglass - both published their first works. Each would become the most famous and enduring texts in what were both prolific careers, and they ensured Sarmiento and Douglass' position as leading figures in the canon of Latin American and U.S. African-American political thought, respectively. But despite the fact that both deal directly with key political and philosophical questions in the Americas, Douglass and Sarmiento, like African-American and Latin American thought more generally, are never read alongside each other. This may be because their ideas about race differed dramatically. Sarmiento advocated the Europeanization of Latin America and espoused a virulent form of anti-indigenous racism, while Douglass opposed slavery and defended the full humanity of black persons. Still, as Juliet Hooker contends, looking at the two together allows one to chart a hemispheric intellectual geography of race that challenges political theory's preoccupation with and assumptions about East / West comparisons, and questions the use of comparison as a tool in the production of theory and philosophy. By juxtaposing four prominent nineteenth and twentieth-century thinkers - Frederick Douglass, Domingo F. Sarmiento, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Jose Vasconcelos - her book will be the first to bring African-American and Latin American political thought into conversation. Hooker stresses that Latin American and U.S. ideas about race were not developed in isolation, but grew out of transnational intellectual exchanges across the Americas. In so doing, she shows that nineteenth and twentieth-century U.S. and Latin American thinkers each looked to political models in the 'other' America to advance racial projects in their own countries. Reading these four intellectuals as hemispheric thinkers, Hooker foregrounds elements of their work that have been dismissed by dominant readings, and provides a crucial platform to bridge the canons of Latin American and African-American political thought.
Posted in Political Science

On Art, Artists, Latin America, and Other Utopias

Author: Luis Camnitzer

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292783493

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 7934

Artist, educator, curator, and critic Luis Camnitzer has been writing about contemporary art ever since he left his native Uruguay in 1964 for a fellowship in New York City. As a transplant from the "periphery" to the "center," Camnitzer has had to confront fundamental questions about making art in the Americas, asking himself and others: What is "Latin American art"? How does it relate (if it does) to art created in the centers of New York and Europe? What is the role of the artist in exile? Writing about issues of such personal, cultural, and indeed political import has long been an integral part of Camnitzer's artistic project, a way of developing an idiosyncratic art history in which to work out his own place in the picture. This volume gathers Camnitzer's most thought-provoking essays—"texts written to make something happen," in the words of volume editor Rachel Weiss. They elaborate themes that appear persistently throughout Camnitzer's work: art world systems versus an art of commitment; artistic genealogies and how they are consecrated; and, most insistently, the possibilities for artistic agency. The theme of "translation" informs the texts in the first part of the book, with Camnitzer asking such questions as "What is Latin America, and who asks the question? Who is the artist, there and here?" The texts in the second section are more historically than geographically oriented, exploring little-known moments, works, and events that compose the legacy that Camnitzer draws on and offers to his readers.
Posted in Art

In the Name of the Great Work

Stalin's Plan for the Transformation of Nature and its Impact in Eastern Europe

Author: Doubravka Olšáková

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785332538

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 1015

Beginning in 1948, the Soviet Union launched a series of wildly ambitious projects to implement Joseph Stalin's vision of a total "transformation of nature." Intended to increase agricultural yields dramatically, this utopian impulse quickly spread to the newly communist states of Eastern Europe, captivating political elites and war-fatigued publics alike. By the time of Stalin's death, however, these attempts at "transformation"-which relied upon ideologically corrupted and pseudoscientific theories-had proven a spectacular failure. This richly detailed volume follows the history of such projects in three communist states-Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia-and explores their varied, but largely disastrous, consequences.
Posted in History

China in Latin America

the whats and wherefores

Author: Robert Evan Ellis

Publisher: Lynne Rienner Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 329

View: 7375

With China on the minds of many in Latin Americażfrom politicians and union leaders to people on the street, from business students to senior bankersża number of important questions arise. Why, for example, is China so rapidly expanding its ties with the region? What is the nature of the new connection, and how will it affect institutions, economic structures, politics, and society? R. Evan Ellis provides a comprehensive look at the character and impact of the developing PRCżLatin America relationship.Ellis examines how the relationship has taken on distinct characteristics in various subregions, considering the role of supplier-and-market countries such as Argentina and Brazil, Chinażs cautious dance with populism as it seeks access to Andean oil, and the dominance of the Taiwan issue in Chinażs dealings with Central American and the Caribbean. He also addresses the unique case of Cuba. Not least, his work sheds light on the implications of the ChinażLatin America relationship for conventional wisdom regarding globalization, development, and the links between economics and politics.
Posted in Business & Economics

In Utopia

Six Kinds of Eden and the Search for a Better Paradise

Author: J. C. Hallman

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466873027

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 903

In 2005, J.C. Hallman came across a scientific paper about "Pleistocene Rewilding," a peculiar idea from conservation biology that suggested repopulating bereft ecosystems with endangered "megafauna." The plan sounded utterly utopian, but Hallman liked the idea as much as the scientists did—perhaps because he had grown up on a street called Utopia Road in a master-planned community in Southern California. Pleistocene Rewilding rekindled in him a longstanding fascination with utopian ideas, and he went on to spend three weeks at the world's oldest "intentional community," sail on the first ship where it's possible to own "real estate," train at the world's largest civilian combat-school, and tour a $30 billion megacity built from scratch on an artificial island off the coast of Korea. In Utopia explores the history of utopian literature and thought in the narrative context of the real-life fruits of that history.
Posted in History

Watching Lacandon Maya Lives

Author: R. Jon McGee

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN: 9780205332182

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 1960

In Watching Lacandon Maya Lives, the author follows three generations of one Lacandon Maya family. Readers track the subjects' lives as they shift through events such as marriage, parenthood, and religious conversion, all set against a backdrop of increased tourism, road construction, and the murders of two people in the community. This book encompasses both ethnography and a critique of ethnographic writing. At one level, the book is about social, agricultural, technological, and religious changes that have occurred in a Lacandon Maya community in Mexico. At a second level, the book is a critique of those who invented a Utopian picture of a "traditional" Lacandon past that never really existed. For cultural anthropologists, or anyone interested in learning more about this Mayan culture.
Posted in History

Patterns of Protest

Trajectories of Participation in Social Movements

Author: Catherine Corrigall-Brown

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804778191

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 2614

Asked to name an activist, many people think of someone like Cesar Chavez or Rosa Parks—someone uniquely and passionately devoted to a cause. Yet, two-thirds of Americans report having belonged to a social movement, attended a protest, or engaged in some form of contentious political activity. Activism, in other words, is something that the vast majority of people engage in. This book examines these more common experiences to ask how and when people choose to engage with political causes. Corrigall-Brown reveals how individual characteristics and life experiences impact the pathway of participation, illustrating that the context and period in which a person engages are critical. This is the real picture of activism, one in which many people engage, in a multitude of ways and with varying degrees of continuity. This book challenges the current conceptualization of activism and pushes us to more systematically examine the varying ways that individuals participate in contentious politics over their lifetimes.
Posted in Social Science

Literary Primitivism

Author: Ben Etherington

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503604098

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 6646

This book fundamentally rethinks a pervasive and controversial concept in literary criticism and the history of ideas. Primitivism has long been accepted as a transhistorical tendency of the "civilized" to idealize that primitive condition against which they define themselves. In the modern era, this has been a matter of the "West" projecting its primitivist fantasies onto non-Western "others." Arguing instead that primitivism was an aesthetic mode produced in reaction to the apotheosis of European imperialism, and that the most intensively primitivist literary works were produced by imperialism's colonized subjects, the book overturns basic assumptions of the last two generations of literary scholarship. Against the grain, Ben Etherington contends that primitivism was an important, if vexed, utopian project rather than a form of racist discourse, a mode that emerged only when modern capitalism was at the point of subsuming all human communities into itself. The primitivist project was an attempt, through art, to recreate a "primitive" condition then perceived to be at its vanishing point. The first overview of this vast topic in forty years, Literary Primitivism maps out previous scholarly paradigms, provides a succinct and readable account of its own methodology, and presents critical readings of key writers, including Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, D. H. Lawrence, and Claude McKay.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Course of Love

A Novel

Author: Alain de Botton

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501134434

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 5482

“An engrossing tale [that] provides plenty of food for thought” (People, Best New Books pick), this playful, wise, and profoundly moving second novel from the internationally bestselling author of How Proust Can Change Your Life tracks the beautifully complicated arc of a romantic partnership. We all know the headiness and excitement of the early days of love. But what comes after? In Edinburgh, a couple, Rabih and Kirsten, fall in love. They get married, they have children—but no long-term relationship is as simple as “happily ever after.” The Course of Love explores what happens after the birth of love, what it takes to maintain, and what happens to our original ideals under the pressures of an average existence. We see, along with Rabih and Kirsten, the first flush of infatuation, the effortlessness of falling into romantic love, and the course of life thereafter. Interwoven with their story and its challenges is an overlay of philosophy—an annotation and a guide to what we are reading. As The New York Times says, “The Course of Love is a return to the form that made Mr. de Botton’s name in the mid-1990s….love is the subject best suited to his obsessive aphorizing, and in this novel he again shows off his ability to pin our hopes, methods, and insecurities to the page.” This is a Romantic novel in the true sense, one interested in exploring how love can survive and thrive in the long term. The result is a sensory experience—fictional, philosophical, psychological—that urges us to identify deeply with these characters and to reflect on his and her own experiences in love. Fresh, visceral, and utterly compelling, The Course of Love is a provocative and life-affirming novel for everyone who believes in love. “There’s no writer alive like de Botton, and his latest ambitious undertaking is as enlightening and humanizing as his previous works” (Chicago Tribune).
Posted in Fiction