The Trains Now Departed

Sixteen Excursions into the Lost Delights of Britain's Railways

Author: Michael Williams

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1409052346

Category: Transportation

Page: 336

View: 7302

SOMETIMES you come across a lofty railway viaduct, marooned in the middle of a remote country landscape. Or a crumbling platform from some once-bustling junction buried under the buddleia. If you are lucky you might be able to follow some rusting tracks, or explore an old tunnel leading to...well, who knows where? Listen hard. Is that the wind in the undergrowth? Or the spectre of a train from a golden era of the past panting up the embankment? These are the ghosts of The Trains Now Departed. They are the railway lines, and services that ran on them that have disappeared and gone forever. Our lost legacy includes lines prematurely axed, often with a gripping and colourful tale of their own, as well as marvels of locomotive engineering sent to the scrapyard, and grand termini felled by the wrecker's ball. Then there are the lost delights of train travel, such as haute cuisine in the dining car, the grand expresses with their evocative names, and continental boat trains to romantic far-off places. The Trains Now Departed tells the stories of some of the most fascinating lost trains of Britain, vividly evoking the glories of a bygone age. In his personal odyssey around Britain Michael Williams tells the tales of the pioneers who built the tracks, the yarns of the men and women who operated them and the colourful trains that ran on them. It is a journey into the soul of our railways, summoning up a magic which, although mired in time, is fortunately not lost for ever. THIS EDITION REVISED AND UPDATED TO INCLUDE MAPS.
Posted in Transportation

Steaming to Victory

How Britain's Railways Won the War

Author: Michael Williams

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1409051897

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 6526

In the seven decades since the darkest moments of the Second World War it seems every tenebrous corner of the conflict has been laid bare, prodded and examined from every perspective of military and social history. But there is a story that has hitherto been largely overlooked. It is a tale of quiet heroism, a story of ordinary people who fought, with enormous self-sacrifice, not with tanks and guns, but with elbow grease and determination. It is the story of the British railways and, above all, the extraordinary men and women who kept them running from 1939 to 1945. Churchill himself certainly did not underestimate their importance to the wartime story when, in 1943, he praised ‘the unwavering courage and constant resourcefulness of railwaymen of all ranks in contributing so largely towards the final victory.’ And what a story it is. The railway system during the Second World War was the lifeline of the nation, replacing vulnerable road transport and merchant shipping. The railways mobilised troops, transported munitions, evacuated children from cities and kept vital food supplies moving where other forms of transport failed. Railwaymen and women performed outstanding acts of heroism. Nearly 400 workers were killed at their posts and another 2,400 injured in the line of duty. Another 3,500 railwaymen and women died in action. The trains themselves played just as vital a role. The famous Flying Scotsman train delivered its passengers to safety after being pounded by German bombers and strafed with gunfire from the air. There were astonishing feats of engineering restoring tracks within hours and bridges and viaducts within days. Trains transported millions to and from work each day and sheltered them on underground platforms at night, a refuge from the bombs above. Without the railways, there would have been no Dunkirk evacuation and no D-Day. Michael Williams, author of the celebrated book On the Slow Train, has written an important and timely book using original research and over a hundred new personal interviews. This is their story.
Posted in History

On the Slow Train Again

Author: Michael Williams

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1409051242

Category: Transportation

Page: 224

View: 3434

Michael Williams has spent the past year travelling along the fascinating rail byways of Britain for this new collection of journeys. Here is the 'train to the end of the world' running for more than four splendid hours through lake, loch and moorland from Inverness to Wick, the most northerly town in Britain. He discovers a perfect country branch line in London's commuterland, and travels on one of the slowest services in the land along the shores of the lovely Dovey estuary to the far west of Wales. He takes the stopping train across the Pennines on a line with so few services that its glorious scenery is a secret known only to the regulars. Here, too, is the Bittern Line in Norfolk and the Tarka Line in North Devon as well as the little branch line to the fishing port of Looe in Cornwall, rescued from closure in the 1960s and now celebrating its 150th anniversary taking families on holiday to the seaside. From the most luxurious and historic - aboard the Orient Express - to the most futuristic - on the driverless trains of London's Docklands Light Railway - here is a unique travel companion celebrating the treasures of our railway heritage from one of Britain's most knowledgeable railway writers.
Posted in Transportation

On The Slow Train

Twelve Great British Railway Journeys

Author: Michael Williams

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1409050890

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 7964

This beautifully-packaged book will take the reader on the slow train to another era when travel meant more than hurrying from one place to the next, the journey meaning nothing but time lost in crowded carriages, condemned by broken timetables. On the Slow Train will reconnect with that long-missed need to lift our heads from the daily grind and reflect that there are still places in Britain where we can stop and stare. It will tap into many things: a love of railways, a love of history, a love of nostalgia. This book will be a paean to another age before milk churns, porters and cats on seats were replaced by security announcements and Burger King. These 12 spectacular journeys will help free us from what Baudelaire denounced as 'the horrible burden of time.' Updated for the paperback.
Posted in Transportation

Belles and Whistles

Journeys Through Time on Britain's Trains

Author: Andrew Martin

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1782830251

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 3034

In the heroic days of rail travel, you could dine on kippers and champagne aboard the Brighton Belle; smoke a post-prandial cigar as the Golden Arrow closed in on Paris, or be shaved by the Flying Scotsman's on-board barber. Everyone from schoolboys to socialites knew of these glamorous 'named trains' and aspired to ride aboard them. In Belles and Whistles, Andrew Martin recreates these famous train journeys by travelling aboard their nearest modern day equivalents. Sometimes their names have survived, even if only as a footnote on a timetable leaflet, but what has usually - if not always - disappeared is the extravagance and luxury. As Martin explains how we got from there to here, evocations of the Golden Age contrast with the starker modern reality: from monogrammed cutlery to stirring sticks, from silence on trains to tannoy announcements, from compartments to airline seating. For those who wonder whatever happened to porters, dining cars, mellow lighting, timetables, luggage in advance, trunk murders, the answers are all here. Martin's five journeys add up to an idiosyncratic history of Britain's railways, combining humour, historical anecdote and reportage from the present and romantic evocations of the past.
Posted in History

The 50 Greatest Train Journeys of the World

Author: Anthony Lambert

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN: 1785780662

Category: Transportation

Page: 300

View: 2309

Whether you’re on the Orient Express or the Inverness to Wick and Thurso route traversing some of the wildest country in Britain, train travel affords a vision of the world like no other. From the modest line through North Yorkshire’s Esk Valley to the Trans-Siberian; from a narrow-gauge web of lines in the Harz Mountains to the coast-tocoast journey through the mountains of Corsica, acclaimed travel writer Anthony Lambert presents an unmissable selection for any traveller who loves the journey as much as the destination. Here is a carefully chosen, wide-ranging selection of train journeys with character, sublime scenery and a real sense of history.
Posted in Transportation

The Country Railway

Author: David St John Thomas

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN: 1781011648

Category: Transportation

Page: 224

View: 7362

Possibly read more than any other railway book, The Country Railway has sold over 170,000 copies. This is a redesigned edition of the original text and photographs. Everyone loved the country railway with its neat stations and colourful gardens, the shining brasswork of its tank engines, viaducts daringly built over gushing rivers, embankments carpeted with flowers, and guards whose appearance and voice as well as the traffic they carried in their vans reflected exactly the character of the terrain being served. Basing his work on deep historical research and rich personal experience, David St John Thomas lovingly portrays the branch and cross-country railway in all its nostalgic, technical and commercial aspects. He tells of the days of high expectation when the local promoters first met and chose the architectural style for their stations, sees the navvies at work hacking through the countryside, reports the arrival of the first trains, recalls the troubled realisation when traffic receipts failed to provide enough for dividends. Stations, signalboxes, engines and their men, coaches and trucks, cattle docks and railway pubs, junctions and termini, varied landscapes, special occasions and disasters… In words and pictures here is a unique study for railway enthusiasts and for those who just miss the passing of the country railway.
Posted in Transportation

Eleven Minutes Late

A Train Journey to the Soul of Britain

Author: Matthew Engel

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0230740413

Category: Transportation

Page: N.A

View: 8680

Britain gave railways to the world, yet its own network is the dearest (definitely) and the worst (probably) in Western Europe. Trains are deeply embedded in the national psyche and folklore - yet it is considered uncool to care about them. For Matthew Engel the railway system is the ultimate expression of Britishness. It represents all the nation's ingenuity, incompetence, nostalgia, corruption, humour, capacity for suffering and even sexual repression. To uncover its mysteries, Engel has travelled the system from Penzance to Thurso, exploring its history and talking to people from politicians to platform staff. Along the way Engel ('half-John Betjeman, half-Victor Meldrew') finds the most charmingly bizarre train in Britain, the most beautiful branch line, the rudest railwayman, and - after a quest lasting decades - an Individual Pot of Strawberry Jam. Eleven Minutes Late is both a polemic and a paean, and it is also very funny.
Posted in Transportation

Ticket to Ride

Around the World on 49 Unusual Train Journeys

Author: Tom Chesshyre

Publisher: Summersdale Publishers LTD

ISBN: 1783728116

Category: Transportation

Page: 320

View: 3993

Why do people love trains so much? Tom Chesshyre is on a mission to find the answer by experiencing the world through train travel—on both epic and everyday rail routes, aboard every type of ride, from steam locomotives to bullet trains, meeting a cast of memorable characters who share a passion for train travel. Join him on the rails and off the beaten track as he embarks on an exhilarating whistle-stop tour around the globe, from Sri Lanka to Iran via Crewe, Inverness, the Australian outback, and beyond.
Posted in Transportation

The Railways

Nation, Network and People

Author: Simon Bradley

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847653529

Category: Transportation

Page: 516

View: 4716

Sunday Times History Book of the Year 2015 Currently filming for BBC programme Full Steam Ahead Britain's railways have been a vital part of national life for nearly 200 years. Transforming lives and landscapes, they have left their mark on everything from timekeeping to tourism. As a self-contained world governed by distinctive rules and traditions, the network also exerts a fascination all its own. From the classical grandeur of Newcastle station to the ceaseless traffic of Clapham Junction, from the mysteries of Brunel's atmospheric railway to the lost routines of the great marshalling yards, Simon Bradley explores the world of Britain's railways, the evolution of the trains, and the changing experiences of passengers and workers. The Victorians' private compartments, railway rugs and footwarmers have made way for air-conditioned carriages with airline-type seating, but the railways remain a giant and diverse anthology of structures from every period, and parts of the system are the oldest in the world. Using fresh research, keen observation and a wealth of cultural references, Bradley weaves from this network a remarkable story of technological achievement, of architecture and engineering, of shifting social classes and gender relations, of safety and crime, of tourism and the changing world of work. The Railways shows us that to travel through Britain by train is to journey through time as well as space.
Posted in Transportation

Mile by Mile

An Illustrated Journey On Britain's Railways as they were in 1947

Author: S. N. Pike

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 1781316724

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 366

Travel back in time on a journey across Britain’s main-line railways on the eve of nationalisation. The views from the carriage windows are conveyed through finely detailed, hand-drawn maps, each a rich reminder of the linesides bursting with activity in an era of technical progress, glamour and prestige. Speed along the LNER’s racing track from King’s Cross to Newcastle upon Tyne and Edinburgh; from next-door St Pancras through the Peak District to Manchester; from Waterloo to Plymouth (with some pleasant seaside diversions on the way); from Euston through the industrial heartlands of the West Midlands and the north-west to the seaport of Liverpool; and from Paddington along Brunel’s ‘bowling green’ railway to Bristol, Exeter and Penzance. Mile by Mile faithfully reproduces the three original route maps drafted in 1947 by S.N. Pike, and adds a new one for the Great Western Railway to complete its coverage of the so-called ‘Big Four’ railway firms formed in the aftermath of the First World War. New introductions describe how the ‘Big Four’ came about, the passengers and goods they conveyed, the key personalities that shaped them – engineers, managers, even publicists – and the trains and locomotives that gave each its unique character. Climb aboard, sit back and take a ride to a special period in the history of Britain’s railways.
Posted in Transportation

Mile by Mile on Britain's Railways

The LNER, LMS, GWR and Southern Railway in 1947

Author: S.N. Pike

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 9781845138110

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 2617

Back in 1947 someone named S.N. Pike â?? we know next to nothing about him â?? published three little pamphlets, each mapping in forensic detail one of Britain's main line rail routes. Now Aurum reissues all three in one handsome volume â?? adding a fourth in the same style to complete the set. Pike produced booklets on the LNER (the East Coast main line), the LMS (West Coast main line) and the Southern Railway network the Brighton line and all its ramifications) â?? but for some reason he never got around to doing one on the Great Western (the route from Paddington to Devon and Cornwall). What subsequently became of S.N. Pike we don't know. But now Aurum completes the set, to make one nostalgic guide to Britain's railways as they were just after the War. These books are full of period interest â?? the East Coast line, for example, still goes past Alexandra Park racecourse, and sees a tangle of colliery sidings all the way up through Yorkshire, and passes 20 places where "GPO mail bag catching nets" are erected close to the rails. When today's high speed trains swish to Paris so fast that the landscape beyond is a blur, this delightful book reminds you what once could be seen on a long railway journey.
Posted in Transportation

Three Men and a Bradshaw

An Original Victorian Travel Journal

Author: John George Freeman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781847947444

Category: England

Page: 364

View: 2422

Over-priced tickets, borderline-inedible food, inconsiderate fellow passengers and mile after mile of endless grey drizzle ... There is much that remains all too familiar to the modern rail passenger in the 140-odd years that have passed since the early 1870s, when John George Freeman set out on a railway tour of Britain's most fashionable holiday destinations along with his brothers Joseph and Charles. The Freeman brothers, all London cloth merchants by trade, were early patrons of the booming Victorian industry in railway tourism. From Devon to North Wales to the Isle of Wight, the rapid expansion of Britain's rail system - along with the publication of George Bradshaw's ever-trustworthy guides to the new railways - had rendered the history and landscape of the entire nation readily accessible to intrepid holidaymakers such as the Freeman brothers. In Three Men and a Bradshaw, the very best of the journals that John George Freeman kept of their travels are brought together to create a fascinating and uniquely personal artefact. Beautifully illustrated with John's original drawings, this is an enchanting description of a distant but nonetheless recognisable Britain which blends together the singularly English wit of Jerome K. Jerome and the Pooterish pathos of the Grossmith brothers' most famous comic creation.
Posted in England

Railways' Strangest Journeys

Extraordinary but true stories from over 150 years of rail travel

Author: Tom Quinn

Publisher: Pavilion Books

ISBN: 1849941793

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 300

View: 8511

A fascinating collection of entertaining stories from as far afield as Europe, Indian and America revealing unusual railway journeys across the centuries, including ghost trains, vanishing passengers and trains fitted with homing pigeons instead of a communication cord! From eccentric lords, who transferred their carriages complete with horses and footmen onto the train, to drivers who stole garden fencing to keep up a good head of steam. 'Railways Strangest Journeys' takes you from the dawn of railway travel when speeds of 15 mph were considered blasphemous and damaging to one's internal organs through the Victorian heyday of Royal Trains and seaside specials, right up to the present day.
Posted in Crafts & Hobbies

Engel's England

Thirty-nine counties, one capital and one man

Author: Matthew Engel

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847659284

Category: History

Page: 883

View: 3151

England, says Matthew Engel, is the most complicated place in the world. And, as he travels through each of the historic English counties, he discovers that's just the start of it. Every county is fascinating, the product of a millennium or more of history: still a unique slice of a nation that has not quite lost its ancient diversity. He finds the well-dressers of Derbyshire and the pyromaniacs of Sussex; the Hindus and huntsmen of Leicestershire; the goddess-worshippers of Somerset. He tracks down the real Lancashire, hedonistic Essex, and the most mysterious house in Middlesex. In Durham he goes straight from choral evensong to the dog track. As he seeks out the essence of each county - from Yorkshire's broad acres to the microdot of Rutland - Engel always finds the unexpected . Engel's England is a totally original look at a confused country: a guidebook for people who don't think they need a guidebook. It is always quirky, sometimes poignant and often extremely funny.
Posted in History

Lost Railway Walks

Author: JULIAN. HOLLAND

Publisher: Collins

ISBN: 9780008319243

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2011

100 selected walks across the length and breadth of Britain's lost railway lines. Each walk includes a short history of the railway before it closed, a description of what can be seen along it today, practical details such as car parking, access by public transport, a detailed route map and historical and modern day photographs. 4,500 miles of railway and 2,000 stations were closed between 1963 and the mid-1970s. While many of these still remain hidden away in the undergrowth or have been lost to road improvements and urban or industrial development, a growing number continue to be slowly reopened both as recreational footpaths and cycleways and as wildlife corridors. Some of our lost railways have also been incorporated into long distance paths, while they all form wildlife corridors in which butterflies, birds, small mammals and wild flowers flourish. They all provide a perfect setting to enjoy a day's walk in the countryside.
Posted in

Great Western Railway: A History

Author: Andrew Roden

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 1845137965

Category: Transportation

Page: 200

View: 8820

DIV God’s Wonderful Railway”, it was called if you were a fan; the “great Way Round” if you took a rather more jaundiced view of some of its circuitous branch lines. But 175 years after its foundation, the Great Western Railway company is remembered with the most nostalgia, even love, of all Britain’s pre-nationalisation railway companies. It built, and ran, the great main line from London to the West Country and Cornwall (today’s First Great Western franchise). It was engineered by the greatest of them all, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who built such wonders as the Box Tunnel and the Saltash bridge. Its steam locomotives were designed by great men like Churchward and Hawkesworth. But also it had wonderful stations like the soaring Paddington and Bristol Temple Meads, as well as innumerable idyllic country halts with little more than a pagoda shelter and a couple of milk churns awaiting collection. Its engines were painted a deep green, its carriages chocolate and cream. Its Cornish Riviera Express train, and the line alongside the beach at Dawlish sprayed by the waves, became the stuff of legend. Now Andy Roden has written the first comprehensive history of the GWR for 20 years, to tie in with its 175th anniversary. It will appeal to everyone who bought his Flying Scotsman or Christian Wolmar’s railway histories. /div
Posted in Transportation

For the Love of Trains

A Celebration of the Railways

Author: Ray Hamilton

Publisher: Summersdale

ISBN: 9781786852694

Category:

Page: 240

View: 3996

Do you know... What are the most unusual things left behind by passengers on British trains? How China is using trains to recreate the ancient Silk Road? How many of the sixty Sherlock Holmes stories feature travel by rail? The appeal of trains travels far and wide. More than just a means of transport, these revolutionary machines connect communities, evoke memories and promise adventures galore. This fact-packed miscellany tracks their development across the globe from the earliest steam locomotives through to the superfast trains of today, stopping off along the way to explore great railway journeys, iconic stations and memorable depictions in the arts. Whether you're a rail aficionado or a curious newcomer, this companion will keep you engrossed and entertained to the end of the line.
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The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald,Matthew Joseph Bruccoli

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684842505

Category: Fiction

Page: 797

View: 5150

F. Scott Fitzgerald is best known for his novels such as THE GREAT GATSBY, but during his all-too-brief literary life, he sold some 160 short stories to popular magazines. Here, noted scholar and biographer Matthew Bruccoli assembles in one volume the full scope of the best of Fitzgerald's short fiction. These 43 sparkling masterpieces are offered in a handsome Scribner Classics edition, perfect for the home library.
Posted in Fiction

Mr. Britling Sees it Through

Author: Herbert George Wells

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: World War, 1914-1918

Page: 441

View: 2540

Posted in World War, 1914-1918