The Time Traveller's Guide to Restoration Britain

Life in the Age of Samuel Pepys, Isaac Newton and The Great Fire of London

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448191971

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 2196

The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook. If you could travel back in time, the period from 1660 to 1700 would make one of the most exciting destinations in history. It is the age of Samuel Pepys and the Great Fire of London; bawdy comedy and the libertine court of Charles II — the civil wars are over and a magnificent new era has begun. But what would it really be like to live in Restoration Britain? Where would you stay and what would you eat? How much should you pay for one of those elaborate wigs? Should you trust a physician who advises you to drink fresh cow’s urine to cure your gout? Why are boys made to smoke in school? And why are you unlikely to get a fair trial in court? The third volume in the series of Ian Mortimer’s bestselling Time Traveller’s Guides answers these crucial questions and encourages us to reflect on the customs and practices of daily life. This unique guide not only teaches us about the seventeenth century but makes us look with fresh eyes at the modern world.
Posted in History

The Time Traveller's Guide to Restoration Britain

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Bodley Head

ISBN: 9781847923042

Category:

Page: 464

View: 4644

The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook. If you could travel back in time, the period from 1660 to 1700 would make one of the most exciting destinations in history. It is the age of Samuel Pepys and the Great Fire of London; bawdy comedy and the libertine court of Charles II; Christopher Wren in architecture, Henry Purcell in music and Isaac Newton in science - the civil wars are over and a magnificent new era has begun. But what would it really be like to live in Restoration Britain? Where would you stay and what would you eat? What would you wear and where would you do your shopping? The third volume in the series of Ian Mortimer's bestselling Time Traveller's Guides answers the crucial questions that a prospective traveller to seventeenth-century Britain would ask. How much should you pay for one of those elaborate wigs? Should you trust a physician who advises you to drink fresh cow's urine to cure your gout? Why are boys made to smoke in school? And why are you unlikely to get a fair trial in court? People's lives are changing rapidly - from a world of superstition and religious explanation to rationalism and scientific calculation. In many respects the period sees the tipping point between the old world and the new as fear and uncertainty, hardship and eating with your fingers give way to curiosity and professionalism, fine wines and knives and forks. Travelling to Restoration Britain encourages us to reflect on the customs and practices of daily life - and this unique guide not only teaches us about the seventeenth century but makes us look with fresh eyes at the modern world.
Posted in

The Time Traveller's Guide to Elizabethan England

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1847921140

Category: England

Page: 420

View: 6819

The past is a foreign country - this is your guide. We think of Queen Elizabeth Iâe(tm)s reign (1558-1603) as a golden age. But what was it actually like to live in Elizabethan England? If you could travel to the past and walk the streets of London in the 1590s, where would you stay? What would you eat? What would you wear? Would you really have a sense of it being a glorious age? And if so, how would that glory sit alongside the vagrants, diseases, violence, sexism and famine of the time? In this book Ian Mortimer reveals a country in which life expectancy is in the early thirties, people still starve to death and Catholics are persecuted for their faith. Yet it produces some of the finest writing in the English language, some of the most magnificent architecture, and sees Elizabeth's subjects settle in America and circumnavigate the globe. Welcome to a country that is, in all its contradictions, the very crucible of the modern world.
Posted in England

The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England

A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439112908

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4093

The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook. Take a step back into Ian Mortimer's guide and experience the middle ages like never before.
Posted in History

A Gambling Man

Charles II's Restoration Game

Author: Jenny Uglow

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429964227

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 8246

The Restoration was a decade of experimentation: from the founding of the Royal Society for investigating the sciences to the startling role of credit and risk; from the shocking licentiousness of the court to failed attempts at religious tolerance. Negotiating all these, Charles II, the "slippery sovereign," laid odds and took chances, dissembling and manipulating his followers. The theaters may have been restored, but the king himself was the supreme actor. Yet while his grandeur, his court, and his colorful sex life were on display, his true intentions lay hidden. Charles II was thirty when he crossed the English Channel in fine May weather in 1660. His Restoration was greeted with maypoles and bonfires, as spring after the long years of Cromwell's rule. But there was no way to turn back, no way he could "restore" the old dispensation. Certainty had vanished. The divinity of kingship had ended with his father's beheading. "Honor" was now a word tossed around in duels. "Providence" could no longer be trusted. As the country was rocked by plague, fire, and war, people searched for new ideas by which to live. And exactly ten years after he arrived, Charles would again stand on the shore at Dover, this time placing the greatest bet of his life in a secret deal with his cousin, Louis XIV of France. Jenny Uglow's previous biographies have won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and International PEN's Hessell-Tiltman Prize for History. A Gambling Man is Uglow at her best: both a vivid portrait of Charles II that explores his elusive nature and a spirited evocation of a vibrant, violent, pulsing world on the brink of modernity.
Posted in History

The Curious World of Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn

Author: Margaret Willes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300221398

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 1782

"Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn vividly reveal in their diaries and correspondence the world of Restoration England. Now Margaret Willes uses the analogy of a cabinet of curiosities to provide a detailed account not only of the two friends but also of their times. Pepys was down to earth and realistic, while Evelyn was a genteel aesthete, but, brought together by their work to help distressed sailors, they developed a long and close friendship. This was enriched by their mutual interest in all aspects of science, in travel and exploration at a time when the known world was rapidly expanding, and their love of books. Above all, they shared an inexhaustible curiosity. Both were on personal terms with the King and his ministers, and leading figures of the scientific, artistic and mercantile communities, so that they provide a very personal portrait of a friendship sustained through a time of war, catastrophe and revolution."--Provided by publisher.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Victorian London

The Tale of a City 1840--1870

Author: Liza Picard

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466863471

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3100

To Londoners, the years 1840 to 1870 were years of dramatic change and achievement. As suburbs expanded and roads multiplied, London was ripped apart to build railway lines and stations and life-saving sewers. The Thames was contained by embankments, and traffic congestion was eased by the first underground railway in the world. A start was made on providing housing for the "deserving poor." There were significant advances in medicine, and the Ragged Schools are perhaps the least known of Victorian achievements, in those last decades before universal state education. In 1851 the Great Exhibition managed to astonish almost everyone, attracting exhibitors and visitors from all over the world. But there was also appalling poverty and exploitation, exposed by Henry Mayhew and others. For the laboring classes, pay was pitifully low, the hours long, and job security nonexistent. Liza Picard shows us the physical reality of daily life in Victorian London. She takes us into schools and prisons, churches and cemeteries. Many practical innovations of the time—flushing lavatories, underground railways, umbrellas, letter boxes, driving on the left—point the way forward. But this was also, at least until the 1850s, a city of cholera outbreaks, transportation to Australia, public executions, and the workhouse, where children could be sold by their parents for as little as £12 and streetpeddlers sold sparrows for a penny, tied by the leg for children to play with. Cruelty and hypocrisy flourished alongside invention, industry, and philanthropy.
Posted in History

Millennium: From Religion to Revolution: How Civilization Has Changed Over a Thousand Years

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681772868

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 1310

History’s greatest tour guide, Ian Mortimer, takes us on an eye-opening and expansive journey through the last millennium of human innovation. In Millennium, bestselling historian Ian Mortimer takes the reader on a whirlwind tour of the last ten centuries of Western history. It is a journey into a past vividly brought to life and bursting with ideas, that pits one century against another in his quest to measure which century saw the greatest change. We journey from a time when there was a fair chance of your village being burned to the ground by invaders — and dried human dung was a recommended cure for cancer — to a world in which explorers sailed into the unknown and civilizations came into conflict with each other on an epic scale. Here is a story of godly scientists, fearless adventurers, cold-hearted entrepreneurs, and strong-minded women — a story of discovery, invention, revolution, and cataclysmic shifts in perspective. Millennium is a journey into the past like no other. Our understanding of human development will never be the same again, and the lessons we learn along the way are profound ones for us all.
Posted in History

The Outcasts of Time

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681776898

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 4769

From the author described by the London Times as "the most remarkable historian of our time” comes a stunning, high-concept time-travel adventure that is perfect for fans of S. J. Parris and Kate Mosse. December 1348. What if you had just six days to save your soul? With the country in the grip of the Black Death, brothers John and William fear that they will shortly die and suffer in the afterlife. But as the end draws near, they are given an unexpected choice: either to go home and spend their last six days in their familiar world, or to search for salvation across the forthcoming centuries – living each one of their remaining days ninety-nine years after the last. John and William choose the future and find themselves in 1447, ignorant of almost everything going on around them. The year 1546 brings no more comfort, and 1645 challenges them in further unexpected ways. It is not just that technology is changing: things they have taken for granted all their lives prove to be short-lived. As they find themselves in stranger and stranger times, the reader travels with them, seeing the world through their eyes as it shifts through disease, progress, enlightenment, and war. But their time is running out—can they do something to redeem themselves before the six days are up?
Posted in Fiction

The Middle Ages Unlocked

A Guide to Life in Medieval England 1050-1300

Author: Gillian Polack & Katrin Kania

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445645890

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 7736

To our modern minds, the Middle Ages seem to mix the well-known and familiar with wildly alien concepts and circumstances. The Middle Ages Unlocked provides an invaluable introduction to this complex and dynamic period in England. Exploring a wide range of topics from law, religion and education to landscape, art and magic, between the eleventh and early fourteenth centuries, the structures, institutions and circumstances that formed the basis for daily life and society are revealed. Drawing on their expertise in history and archaeology, Dr Gillian Polack and Dr Katrin Kania look at the tangible aspects of daily life - ranging from the raw materials used for crafts, clothing and jewellery to housing and food - in order to bring the Middle Ages to life. The Middle Ages Unlocked dispels modern assumptions about this period to uncover the complex tapestry of medieval England and the people who lived there.
Posted in History

The Dying and the Doctors

The Medical Revolution in Seventeenth-Century England

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 0861933265

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 4977

A survey of the changes in medical care for those approaching death in the early modern period.
Posted in History

Restoration

1666: A Year in Britain

Author: Alexander Larman

Publisher: Head of Zeus

ISBN: 1781852669

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5614

In an England inhabited by Pepys, Evelyn, Dryden, Hobbes and the young Isaac Newton, Charles II is king, and the nation is beginning to relax a little after the tough, joyless years of Cromwell's Protectorate. In RESTORATION, Alex Larman paints a fascinating portrait of a country in the throes of social, political and cultural change following the convulsions of the Interregnum. Exploring every level of English society, from innkeepers and upholsterers to lawyers and courtiers, and examining themes as diverse as marriage, sexuality and religion, he creates a pointilliste and multi-faceted portrait of Restoration England. By looking at the year 1666 through the eyes of the people of the time, by revealing what they ate and drank, how they loved, lived and died and how they interacted, Alex Larman brings alive the England of 300 years ago as you have never seen it before: exciting, tangible, and fully comprehensible.
Posted in History

How To Be a Tudor: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Tudor Life

Author: Ruth Goodman

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 1631491407

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 4802

An erudite romp through the intimate details of life in Tudor England, "Goodman's latest…is a revelation" (New York Times Book Review). On the heels of her triumphant How to Be a Victorian, Ruth Goodman travels even further back in English history to the era closest to her heart, the dramatic period from the crowning of Henry VII to the death of Elizabeth I. A celebrated master of British social and domestic history, Ruth Goodman draws on her own adventures living in re-created Tudor conditions to serve as our intrepid guide to sixteenth-century living. Proceeding from daybreak to bedtime, this “immersive, engrossing” (Slate) work pays tribute to the lives of those who labored through the era. From using soot from candle wax as toothpaste to malting grain for homemade ale, from the gruesome sport of bear-baiting to cuckolding and cross-dressing—the madcap habits and revealing intimacies of life in the time of Shakespeare are vividly rendered for the insatiably curious.
Posted in History

Quicksilver

The Baroque Cycle #1

Author: Neal Stephenson

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0060833165

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 9508

In which Daniel Waterhouse, fearless thinker and courageous Puritan, pursues knowledge in the company of the greatest minds of Baroque-era Europe -- in a chaotic world where reason wars with the bloody ambitions of the mighty, and where catastrophe, natural or otherwise, can alter the political landscape overnight.
Posted in Fiction

The Clockwork Universe

saac Newto, Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern WorldI

Author: Edward Dolnick

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062042262

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9566

New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history—when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world. Dolnick’s earth-changing story of Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the birth of modern science is at once an entertaining romp through the annals of academic history, in the vein of Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, and a captivating exploration of a defining time for scientific progress, in the tradition of Richard Holmes’ The Age of Wonder.
Posted in History

The Hedgehog, the Fox, and the Magister's Pox

Mending the Gap Between Science and the Humanities

Author: Stephen Jay Gould

Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)

ISBN: 1400051533

Category: Science

Page: 273

View: 2698

Draws on the philosophy of seventh century B.C. Greek soldier and poet Archilochus to challenge assumptions about an inescapable conflict between science and the humanities, rebut ideas from Edward O. Wilson's Consilience, and explain why the pursuit of knowledge must always operate in tandem with nature. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.
Posted in Science

Georgian London

Into the Streets

Author: Lucy Inglis

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0670920150

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8401

In Georgian London: Into the Streets, Lucy Inglis takes readers on a tour of London's most formative age - the age of love, sex, intellect, art, great ambition and fantastic ruin. Travel back to the Georgian years, a time that changed expectations of what life could be. Peek into the gilded drawing rooms of the aristocracy, walk down the quiet avenues of the new middle class, and crouch in the damp doorways of the poor. But watch your wallet - tourists make perfect prey for the thriving community of hawkers, prostitutes and scavengers. Visit the madhouses of Hackney, the workshops of Soho and the mean streets of Cheapside. Have a coffee in the city, check the stock exchange, and pop into St Paul's to see progress on the new dome. This book is about the Georgians who called London their home, from dukes and artists to rent boys and hot air balloonists meeting dog-nappers and life-models along the way. It investigates the legacies they left us in architecture and art, science and society, and shows the making of the capital millions know and love today. 'Read and be amazed by a city you thought you knew' Jonathan Foyle, World Monuments Fund 'Jam-packed with unusual insights and facts. A great read from a talented new historian' Independent 'Pacy, superbly researched. The real sparkle lies in its relentless cavalcade of insightful anecdotes . . . There's much to treasure here' Londonist 'Inglis has a good ear for the outlandish, the farcical, the bizarre and the macabre. A wonderful popular history of Hanoverian London' London Historians In 2009 Lucy Inglis began blogging on the lesser-known aspects of London during the Eighteenth Century - including food, immigration and sex- at GeorgianLondon.com. She lives in London with her husband. Georgian London is her first book.
Posted in History

Observations and Predictions of Eclipse Times by Early Astronomers

Author: J.M. Steele

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401595283

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 5548

Eclipses have long been seen as important celestial phenomena, whether as omens affecting the future of kingdoms, or as useful astronomical events to help in deriving essential parameters for theories of the motion of the moon and sun. This is the first book to collect together all presently known records of timed eclipse observations and predictions from antiquity to the time of the invention of the telescope. In addition to cataloguing and assessing the accuracy of the various records, which come from regions as diverse as Ancient Mesopotamia, China, and Europe, the sources in which they are found are described in detail. Related questions such as what type of clocks were used to time the observations, how the eclipse predictions were made, and how these prediction schemes were derived from the available observations are also considered. The results of this investigation have important consequences for how we understand the relationship between observation and theory in early science and the role of astronomy in early cultures, and will be of interest to historians of science, astronomers, and ancient and medieval historians.
Posted in History

The Diary of Samuel Pepys ...

For the First Time Fully Transcribed from the Shorthand Manuscript in the Pepysian Library, Magdalene College, Cambridge

Author: Samuel Pepys,Mynors Bright,Richard Griffin Baron Braybrooke

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: N.A

View: 9162

Posted in Great Britain

Human Race

10 Centuries of Change on Earth

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Vintage Books

ISBN: 9780099593386

Category:

Page: 416

View: 6369

We are an astonishing species. Over the past millennium of plagues and exploration, revolution and scientific discovery, womanâe(tm)s rights and technological advances, human society has changed beyond recognition. Sweeping through the last thousand years of human development, Human Race is a treasure chest of the lunar leaps and lightbulb moments that, for better or worse, have sent humanity swerving down a path that no one could ever have predicted. But which of the last ten centuries saw the greatest changes in human history? Historyâe(tm)s greatest tour guide, Ian Mortimer, knows what answer he would give. But whatâe(tm)s yours?
Posted in