The Social Fabric of Health

An Introduction to Medical Anthropology

Author: John M. Janzen

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 313

View: 6877

This book covers the familiar themes in medical anthropology, but places them in a unique perspective. Using a "fabric" metaphor, The Social Fabric of Health weaves together relationships, bodies, feelings, narratives, idea, material support, and institutions in the human experience of health, illness, and healing. In addition to the unique "fabric" perspective the book brings to the subject of medical anthropology, it also brings another unique perspective to thissubject: Using signs-an approach commonly known as semiotics-the text formulates the nuances between the subjective realm of individual experience and the more objective, public world of symbols, codes, and laws.
Posted in Social Science

Introducing Medical Anthropology

A Discipline in Action

Author: Merrill Singer,Hans Baer

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 0759120900

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 7885

This new edition introduces students to the growing field of medical anthropology. It reviews the basic perspectives and concepts and the latest debates in the field in a more comprehensive fashion than many other comparable works.
Posted in Social Science

Culture and Health

Applying Medical Anthropology

Author: Michael Winkelman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470462612

Category: Medical

Page: 512

View: 636

Culture and Health offers an overview of different areas of culture and health, building on foundations of medical anthropology and health behavior theory. It shows how to address the challenges of cross-cultural medicine through interdisciplinary cultural-ecological models and personal and institutional developmental approaches to cross-cultural adaptation and competency. The book addresses the perspectives of clinically applied anthropology, trans-cultural psychiatry and the medical ecology, critical medical anthropology and symbolic paradigms as frameworks for enhanced comprehension of health and the medical encounter. Includes cultural case studies, applied vignettes, and self-assessments.
Posted in Medical

An Introduction to the Sociology of Health and Illness

Author: Kevin White

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1473994497

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 470

The bestselling An Introduction to the Sociology of Health and Illness has long been the go-to text for students looking for a clear, engaging and theoretically informed introduction to this dynamic topic. Written with a truly sociological and critical perspective, and thoroughly updated to include the latest cutting-edge thinking in the area, the new edition is packed with new empirical examples. Incorporating helpful learning features including chapter overviews, boxed cases, summaries and further reading, this book is a stimulating and thought-provoking essential text for students in health, nursing and sociology schools.
Posted in Social Science

Pathologies of the West

An Anthropology of Mental Illness in Europe and America

Author: Roland Littlewood

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801487439

Category: Medical

Page: 286

View: 6487

Psychiatry conventionally regards spirit possession and dramatic healing rituals in non-European societies as forms of abnormality if not mental illness. Roland Littlewood, a psychiatrist and social anthropologist, argues that it is necessary to take into account both social process and personal cultural meaning when explaining psychiatric illness and "deviant" behavior. Littlewood brings anthropological and psychiatric literature to bear on case studies of self-poisoning, agoraphobia, hysteria, chronic fatigue syndrome, post-traumatic stress, male sexual violence, and eating disorders. He contends that Western psychiatric illnesses are themselves "possession states"—patterns by which individual agency is displaced through an idiom of alien intrusion whether of a spirit or a disease.Pathologies of the West is simultaneously an original approach to psychiatric illness in its international perspective and an introduction to recent developments in the social anthropology of medicine. It examines critically the relevance of phenomenological, structural, and ethological approaches to understanding extreme personal experience. Littlewood argues that anthropology must not simply provide a cultural alternative to sociological critiques of medicine—psychiatry itself should take into account the ways in which cultural values are acted out by individuals.
Posted in Medical

Encyclopedia of Medical Anthropology

Health and Illness in the World's Cultures Topics - Volume 1; Cultures -

Author: Carol R. Ember,Melvin Ember

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0306477548

Category: Diseases

Page: 1071

View: 5581

Posted in Diseases

Writing at the Margin

Discourse Between Anthropology and Medicine

Author: Arthur Kleinman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520209656

Category: Social Science

Page: 314

View: 8168

"This is the work of an energetic scholar whose capacity to read, digest, and reflect on ideas in diverse domains of inquiry is probably unequaled in the field."—Sue Estroff, author of Making It Crazy "An important book."—Charles Leslie, coeditor of Paths to Asian Medical Knowledge
Posted in Social Science

The Cultural Context of Health, Illness, and Medicine

Author: Elisa Janine Sobo,Martha O. Loustaunau

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 031337760X

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 268

View: 2967

A "one size fits all" approach to health care doesn't work well, especially for America's extremely diverse population. This book provides a lively and accessible discussion of how and why a more flexible and culturally sensitive system of health care can—and must be—achieved. * More than 30 percent new material updates the 1997 edition, reflecting new scholarship and addressing emerging needs * Multiple real-life examples and case studies illustrate and explain concepts * Discussion questions follow each chapter and an appendix with project suggestions is provided * A bibliography offers suggestions for further reading
Posted in Health & Fitness

Introduction to Syndemics

A Critical Systems Approach to Public and Community Health

Author: Merrill Singer

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470483008

Category: Medical

Page: 304

View: 5003

This book explains the growing field of syndemic theory and research, a framework for the analysis and prevention of disease interactions that addresses underlying social and environmental causes. This perspective complements single-issue prevention strategies, which can be effective for discrete problems, but often are mismatched to the goal of protecting the public's health in its widest sense. "Merrill Singer has astutely described why health problems should not be seen in isolation, but rather in the context of other diseases and the social and economic inequities that fuel them. An important read for public health and social scientists." —Michael H. Merson, director, Duke Global Health Institute "Not only does this book provide a persuasive theoretical biosocial model of syndemics, but it also illustrates the model with a wide variety of fascinating historical and contemporary examples." —Peter J. Brown, professor of Anthropology and Global Health and director, Center for Health, Culture, and Society, Emory University "The concept of syndemics is Singer's most important contribution to critical medical anthropology as it interfaces with an ecosocial approach to epidemiology." —Mark Nichter, Regents Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona "Merrill Singer offers the public the most comprehensive work ever written on this key area of research and policy making." —Francisco I. Bastos, chairman of the graduate studies on epidemiology, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz "Exquisitely describes how this new approach is a critical tool that brings together veterinary, medical, and social sciences to solve emerging infectious and non-infectious diseases of today's world." —Bonnie Buntain, MS, DVM, diplomate, American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine "For too long the great integrative perspectives on modern biomedicine and public health disease ecology and social medicine-have remained more or less separate. In this innovative and provocative book, Merrill Singer develops a valuable synthesis that will reshape the way we think about health and disease." —Warwick H. Anderson, MD, PhD, professorial research fellow, Department of History and Centre for Values, Ethics, and the Law in Medicine, University of Sidney
Posted in Medical

The Encultured Brain

An Introduction to Neuroanthropology

Author: Daniel H. Lende,Greg Downey

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262304740

Category: Medical

Page: 448

View: 9653

The brain and the nervous system are our most cultural organs. Our nervous system is especially immature at birth, our brain disproportionately small in relation to its adult size and open to cultural sculpting at multiple levels. Recognizing this, the new field of neuroanthropology places the brain at the center of discussions about human nature and culture. Anthropology offers brain science more robust accounts of enculturation to explain observable difference in brain function; neuroscience offers anthropology evidence of neuroplasticity's role in social and cultural dynamics. This book provides a foundational text for neuroanthropology, offering basic concepts and case studies at the intersection of brain and culture. After an overview of the field and background information on recent research in biology, a series of case studies demonstrate neuroanthropology in practice. Contributors first focus on capabilities and skills -- including memory in medical practice, skill acquisition in martial arts, and the role of humor in coping with breast cancer treatment and recovery -- then report on problems and pathologies that range from post-traumatic stress disorder among veterans to smoking as a part of college social life. ContributorsMauro C. Balieiro, Kathryn Bouskill, Rachel S. Brezis, Benjamin Campbell, Greg Downey, José Ernesto dos Santos, William W. Dressler, Erin P. Finley, Agustín Fuentes, M. Cameron Hay, Daniel H. Lende, Katherine C. MacKinnon, Katja Pettinen, Peter G. Stromberg
Posted in Medical

Global Health

An Anthropological Perspective

Author: Merrill Singer,Pamela I. Erickson

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 147861028X

Category: Social Science

Page: 142

View: 4297

Affordable and conceptually accessible, this succinct volume captures the distinctive anthropological perspective on global health issues for undergraduates in the social and health sciences. Ideal for professors who want to add an experiential human face, a cultural dimension, and an emic understanding of health in cross-cultural contexts to interdisciplinary course content, Global Health exposes the day-to-day health challenges people around the world face. Key to its message is that, despite strides in improving worldwide health, human impacts on the environment, violent social conflict, and increasing social inequality diminish the success of global health initiatives to protect against illness, disability, and death. Readers, gripped by the impact of undeniable, far-reaching realities such as global warming, infectious disease, food insecurity, water crises, war and genocide, and refugee crises, will learn to apply a holistic, anthropological framework in search of solutions to such complex biosocial conditions.
Posted in Social Science

Unhealthy Health Policy

A Critical Anthropological Examination

Author: Merrill Singer,Arachu Castro

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 0759115338

Category: Medical

Page: 408

View: 3943

This new collection turns a critical anthropological eye on the nature of health policy internationally. The authors reveal the prevailing social inequalities that often represent significant threats to the health and well being of the poor, ethnic minorities, and women. The authors define an 'anthropology of policy' concerned with decision-making and the impact of health policy on human lives. It will be a critical resource for researchers and practitioners in medical anthropology, medical sociology, public policy, and public health care.
Posted in Medical

Understanding and Applying Medical Anthropology

Author: Peter J. Brown,Svea Closser

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315416166

Category: Social Science

Page: 460

View: 3677

The editors of the third edition of the seminal textbook Understanding and Applying Medical Anthropology bring it completely up to date for both instructors and students. The collection of 49 readings (17 of them new to this edition) offers extensive background description and exposes students to the breadth of theoretical, methodological, and practical perspectives and issues in the field of medical anthropology. The text provides specific examples and case studies of research as it is applied to a range of health settings: from cross-cultural clinical encounters to cultural analysis of new biomedical technologies and the implementation of programs in global health settings. The new edition features: • a major revision that eliminates many older readings in favor of more fresh, relevant selections; • a new section on structural violence that looks at the impact of poverty and other forms of social marginalization on health; • an updated and expanded section on “Conceptual Tools,” including new research and ideas that are currently driving the field of medical anthropology forward (such as epigenetics and syndemics); • new chapters on climate change, Ebola, PTSD among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans, eating disorders, and autism, among others; • recent articles from Margaret Mead Award winners Sera Young, Seth Holmes, and Erin Finley, along with new articles by such established medical anthropologists as Paul Farmer and Merrill Singer.
Posted in Social Science

The Anthropology of Health and Healing

Author: Mari Womack

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780759110441

Category: Social Science

Page: 367

View: 378

The Anthropology of Health and Healing is the first text to take an integrative approach to the discipline of medical anthropology. In this book, Mari Womack champions a practice of medicine that includes the maintenance of health as well as treatment of illness, emphasizing the importance of lifestyle and the life cycle.
Posted in Social Science

Introducing Medical Anthropology

A Discipline in Action

Author: Merrill Singer,Hans A. Baer

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 9780759110588

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 246

View: 6415

A new text in the growing field of medical anthropology.
Posted in Health & Fitness

Medicine Across Cultures

History and Practice of Medicine in Non-Western Cultures

Author: Helaine Selin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402011660

Category: Medical

Page: 417

View: 6433

This work deals with the medical knowledge and beliefs of cultures outside of the United States and Europe. In addition to articles surveying Islamic, Chinese, Native American, Aboriginal Australian, Indian, Egyptian, and Tibetan medicine, the book includes essays on comparing Chinese and western medicine and religion and medicine. Each essay is well illustrated and contains an extensive bibliography.
Posted in Medical

Ethnomedicine

Author: Pamela I. Erickson

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 1478608641

Category: Social Science

Page: 124

View: 6181

People throughout time and place, no matter their belief system, have sought to discover causes and cures for illness and disease. Among Westerners is a groundswell to augment biomedicine with holistic practices inherent in ethnomedicines of non-Western traditions. Yet missing are awareness and knowledge of the foundations and outgrowth of these alternative concepts. Erickson fills this gap by clearly explaining the basic organizing principles that underlie all medical systems, the full range of theories of disease causation, the geographical distribution of medical practices, and the historical trends that led to biomedical dominance. Her efficient, balanced approach highlights commonalities among the worlds vast and diverse medical systems, making ethnomedicine easier to internalize and to apply in clinical settings.
Posted in Social Science

An Introduction to Global Health Delivery

Author: Joia S. Mukherjee

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190662468

Category: Medical

Page: 256

View: 1440

"What Mukherjee attempts, and succeeds in doing, is to offer what many students -- undergraduates as well as students of medicine, nursing, and public health -- have long clamored for: a primer not only of recent developments in global health, but also a patient dissection of what has worked less well (and what hasn't worked at all)." --Paul Farmer, from the foreword The field of global health has roots in the AIDS pandemic of the late 20th century, when the installation of health care systems supplanted older, low-cost prevention programs to help stem the spread of HIV in low- and middle-income Africa. Today's global health is rooted the belief that health care is a human right, and that by promoting health we can cultivate equity and social justice in places where such values aren't always found. AN INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL HEALTH DELIVERY is a short but immersive introduction to global health's origins, actors, interventions, and challenges. Informed by physician Joia Mukherjee's quarter-century of experience fighting disease and poverty in more than a dozen countries, it delivers a clear-eyed overview of the movement underway to reduce global health disparities and establish sustainable access to care, including details of what has worked so far -- and what hasn't. Grounded in the historical and social factors that propagate health disparities and enriched with case studies and exercises that encourage readers to think critically about the subject matter, this text is the essential starting point for readers of any background seeking a practical grounding in global health's promise and progress.
Posted in Medical

An Introduction to Molecular Anthropology

Author: Mark Stoneking

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119050871

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 8058

Molecular anthropology uses molecular genetic methods to address questions and issues of anthropological interest. More specifically, molecular anthropology is concerned with genetic evidence concerning human origins, migrations, and population relationships, including related topics such as the role of recent natural selection in human population differentiation, or the impact of particular social systems on patterns of human genetic variation. Organized into three major sections, An Introduction to Molecular Anthropology first covers the basics of genetics – what genes are, what they do, and how they do it – as well as how genes behave in populations and how evolution influences them. The following section provides an overview of the different kinds of genetic variation in humans, and how this variation is analyzed and used to make evolutionary inferences. The third section concludes with a presentation of the current state of genetic evidence for human origins, the spread of humans around the world, the role of selection and adaptation in human evolution, and the impact of culture on human genetic variation. A final, concluding chapter discusses various aspects of molecular anthropology in the genomics era, including personal ancestry testing and personal genomics. An Introduction to Molecular Anthropology is an invaluable resource for students studying human evolution, biological anthropology, or molecular anthropology, as well as a reference for anthropologists and anyone else interested in the genetic history of humans.
Posted in Science

addicted.pregnant.poor

Author: Kelly Ray Knight

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822375184

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 5407

For the addicted, pregnant, and poor women living in daily-rent hotels in San Francisco's Mission district, life is marked by battles against drug cravings, housing debt, and potential violence. In this stunning ethnography Kelly Ray Knight presents these women in all their complex humanity and asks what kinds of futures are possible for them given their seemingly hopeless situation. During her four years of fieldwork Knight documented women’s struggles as they traveled from the street to the clinic, jail, and family court, and back to the hotels. She approaches addicted pregnancy as an everyday phenomenon in these women's lives and describes how they must navigate the tension between pregnancy's demands to stay clean and the pull of addiction and poverty toward drug use and sex work. By creating the space for addicted women's own narratives and examining addicted pregnancy from medical, policy, and social science perspectives, Knight forces us to confront and reconsider the ways we think about addiction, trauma, health, criminality, and responsibility.
Posted in Social Science