The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America

Author: Eric P. KAUFMANN,Eric P Kaufmann

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674039386

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 9601

Posted in History

The Rise and Fall of the European Defence Community

Anglo-American Relations and the Crisis of European Defence, 1950-55

Author: K. Ruane

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230599087

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 5804

Using the European Defence Community (EDC) as a case-study, this book examines the competing and often conflicting view of the British and American governments towards European integration in the early 1950s. The British, fearing an 'agonizing reappraisal' of the American defence commitment to Europe if the supranational EDC failed, went to great lengths to ensure the success of the scheme. When, despite these efforts, the EDC finally collapsed in August 1954, NATO was plunged into arguably the most severe crisis in its history. The crisis also possessed an Anglo-American dimension, with London and Washington badly divided on how it should be resolved. In the end, the British were instrumental in the creation of the Western European Union as a successor to the EDC. Their crisis management, however, had been rooted in fear of the 'agonizing reappraisal', a danger dismissed by many historians as exaggerated but which the British, in 1954, were perhaps right to take seriously.
Posted in History

The Rise and Fall of the American Empire

A Re-Interpretation of History, Economics and Philosophy: 1492-2006

Author: Rocky M. Mirza

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1425113834

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 4415

Dr. Mirza's unorthodox but refreshing look at the history of the US and its failure to plant true democracy at home or abroad goes a long way towards explaining its failed invasion of Iraq.
Posted in History

The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism

A Short History

Author: David Farber

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400834295

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 1675

The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism tells the gripping story of perhaps the most significant political force of our time through the lives and careers of six leading figures at the heart of the movement. David Farber traces the history of modern conservatism from its revolt against New Deal liberalism, to its breathtaking resurgence under Ronald Reagan, to its spectacular defeat with the election of Barack Obama. Farber paints vivid portraits of Robert Taft, William F. Buckley Jr., Barry Goldwater, Phyllis Schlafly, Ronald Reagan, and George W. Bush. He shows how these outspoken, charismatic, and frequently controversial conservative leaders were united by a shared insistence on the primacy of social order, national security, and economic liberty. Farber demonstrates how they built a versatile movement capable of gaining and holding power, from Taft's opposition to the New Deal to Buckley's founding of the National Review as the intellectual standard-bearer of modern conservatism; from Goldwater's crusade against leftist politics and his failed 1964 bid for the presidency to Schlafly's rejection of feminism in favor of traditional gender roles and family values; and from Reagan's city upon a hill to conservatism's downfall with Bush's ambitious presidency. The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism provides rare insight into how conservatives captured the American political imagination by claiming moral superiority, downplaying economic inequality, relishing bellicosity, and embracing nationalism. This concise and accessible history reveals how these conservative leaders discovered a winning formula that enabled them to forge a powerful and formidable political majority. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
Posted in History

Whiteshift

Populism, Immigration and the Future of White Majorities

Author: Eric Kaufmann

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241317126

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 9053

Across the West, anti-immigration populists are tearing a path through the usual politics of left and right. Immigration is remaking Europe and North America: over half of American babies are non-white, and by the end of the century, minorities and those of mixed race are projected to form the majority in many countries. Drawing on an extraordinary range of surveys, Whiteshift explores the majority response to ethnic change in Western Europe, North America and Australasia. Eric Kaufmann, a leading expert on immigration, calls for us to move beyond empty talk about national identity and open up debate about the future of white majorities. He argues that we must ditch the 'diversity myth' that whites will dwindle, replacing it with whiteshift - a new story of majority transformation that can help lift anxieties and heal today's widening political divisions. A bold, original work, Whiteshift will redefine the way we think about ethnic diversity and populism.
Posted in Social Science

Rethinking Ethnicity

Majority Groups and Dominant Minorities

Author: Eric P. Kaufmann

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415315425

Category: Political Science

Page: 254

View: 2491

Globalization and migration are pressuring nations around the world to change their ethnic self-definition and to treasure diversity not homogeneity. This book explores the growing gap between modern nations and their dominant ethnic groups.
Posted in Political Science

Alle Menschen sind gleich - erfolgreiche nicht

Die verblüffenden kulturellen Ursachen von Erfolg

Author: Amy Chua,Jed Rubenfeld

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN: 3593501171

Category: Political Science

Page: 318

View: 7829

Warum sind Einwanderer aus China und dem Iran Gewinnertypen und die aus anderen Nationen oft nicht? »Tigermutter« Amy Chua und ihr Mann Jed Rubenfeld haben eine überraschende Antwort. Erfolg hat, wer drei Dinge mit auf den Weg bekommt: das Gefühl kollektiver Überlegenheit, gepaart mit einer tiefen Unsicherheit gegenüber der neuen Gesellschaft und nicht zuletzt einer guten Portion Selbstdisziplin. Das Gute: Das Erfolgsprinzip ist kulturell geprägt, aber dennoch übertragbar und kann uns auch hierzulande eine Lehre sein. Vorausgesetzt, wir haben den nötigen Biss!
Posted in Political Science

America and the British Imaginary in Turn-of-the-Twentieth-Century Literature

Author: B. Miller

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230114628

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 9708

In an innovative reading of fin-de-siecle cultural texts, Miller argues that British representations of America, Americans, and Anglo-American relations at the turn of the twentieth century provided an important forum for cultural distinction.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Rise and Fall of Intelligence

An International Security History

Author: Michael Warner

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 1626160465

Category: Political Science

Page: 424

View: 7680

This sweeping history of the development of professional, institutionalized intelligence examines the implications of the fall of the state monopoly on espionage today and beyond. During the Cold War, only the alliances clustered around the two superpowers maintained viable intelligence endeavors, whereas a century ago many states could aspire to be competitive at espionage. Recent technological and sociopolitical changes have made it possible for private entities and even individuals to unearth secrets and influence global events. Historian Michael Warner addresses the birth of professional intelligence in Europe at the beginning of the twentieth century, the subsequent rise of US intelligence during the Cold War, and changes in the field ensuing from the struggle against terrorism and the digital revolution. Throughout, the book emphasizes how technological advancement and ideological competition drive intelligence, improving its techniques and creating a need for intelligence and counterintelligence activities to serve and protect policymakers and commanders.
Posted in Political Science

Spies

The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America

Author: John Earl Haynes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300155727

Category: Espionage, Soviet

Page: 650

View: 9580

This stunning book, based on KGB archives that have never come to light before, provides the most complete account of Soviet espionage in America ever written. In 1993, former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev was permitted unique access to Stalin-era records of Soviet intelligence operations against the United States. Years later, living in Britain, Vassiliev retrieved his extensive notebooks of transcribed documents from Moscow.With these notebooks John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr have meticulously constructed a new, sometimes shocking, historical account.Along with general insights into espionage tactics and the motives of Americans who spied for Stalin, "Spies" resolves specific, long-seething controversies. The book confirms, among many other things, that Alger Hiss cooperated with Soviet intelligence over a long period of years, that journalist I. F. Stone worked on behalf of the KGB in the 1930s, and that Robert Oppenheimer was never recruited by Soviet intelligence. "Spies" also uncovers numerous American spies who were never even under suspicion and satisfyingly identifies the last unaccounted for American nuclear spies. Vassiliev tells the story of the notebooks and his own extraordinary life in a gripping introduction to the volume.
Posted in Espionage, Soviet

The Rise and Fall of the Choctaw Republic

Author: Angie Debo

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806112473

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 8934

Records the history of the Choctaw Indians through their political, social, and economic customs.
Posted in History

The Rise and Fall of Radical Westminster, 1780-1890

Author: M. Baer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137035293

Category: Political Science

Page: 363

View: 5082

The Rise and Fall of Radical Westminster, 1780-1890 explores a critical chapter in the story of Britain's transition to democracy. Utilising the remarkably rich documentation generated by Westminster elections, Baer reveals how the most radical political space in the age of oligarchy became the most conservative and tranquil in an age of democracy.
Posted in Political Science

The Rise and Fall of the Grand Alliance, 1941–45

Author: Ann Lane,Howard Temperley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 134924242X

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 1012

This collection by leading British and American scholars on twentieth century international history covers the strategy, diplomacy and intelligence of the Anglo-American-Soviet alliance during the Second World War. It includes the evolution of allied war aims in both the European and Pacific theatres, the policies surrounding the development and use of the atomic bomb and the evolution of the international intelligence community. It also considers the origins and consequences of inter-allied economic relations as they emerged during the war and the personal relationship between Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Posted in History

Native Americans and Anglo-American Culture, 1750-1850

The Indian Atlantic

Author: Tim Fulford,Kevin Hutchings

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521888484

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 263

View: 3823

This book explains how complex relationships between Britons, Native Americans and Anglo-Americans shaped eighteenth- and nineteenth-century culture.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Replenishing the Earth

The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Angloworld

Author: James Belich

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 019161971X

Category: Political Science

Page: 586

View: 568

Why are we speaking English? Replenishing the Earth gives a new answer to that question, uncovering a 'settler revolution' that took place from the early nineteenth century that led to the explosive settlement of the American West and its forgotten twin, the British West, comprising the settler dominions of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Between 1780 and 1930 the number of English-speakers rocketed from 12 million in 1780 to 200 million, and their wealth and power grew to match. Their secret was not racial, or cultural, or institutional superiority but a resonant intersection of historical changes, including the sudden rise of mass transfer across oceans and mountains, a revolutionary upward shift in attitudes to emigration, the emergence of a settler 'boom mentality', and a late flowering of non-industrial technologies -wind, water, wood, and work animals - especially on settler frontiers. This revolution combined with the Industrial Revolution to transform settlement into something explosive - capable of creating great cities like Chicago and Melbourne and large socio-economies in a single generation. When the great settler booms busted, as they always did, a second pattern set in. Links between the Anglo-wests and their metropolises, London and New York, actually tightened as rising tides of staple products flowed one way and ideas the other. This 're-colonization' re-integrated Greater America and Greater Britain, bulking them out to become the superpowers of their day. The 'Settler Revolution' was not exclusive to the Anglophone countries - Argentina, Siberia, and Manchuria also experienced it. But it was the Anglophone settlers who managed to integrate frontier and metropolis most successfully, and it was this that gave them the impetus and the material power to provide the world's leading super-powers for the last 200 years. This book will reshape understandings of American, British, and British dominion histories in the long 19th century. It is a story that has such crucial implications for the histories of settler societies, the homelands that spawned them, and the indigenous peoples who resisted them, that their full histories cannot be written without it.
Posted in Political Science

A Changing of the Guard

Anglo-American Relations, 1941-1946

Author: Randall Bennett Woods

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807818770

Category: History

Page: 473

View: 5479

Between 1941 and 1946, in response to the devastation caused by World War II, memories of the Great Depression, and the prospect of Soviet expansion, a group of politicians, diplomats, and economists in the United States and Great Britain sought to repair the ruined economies of of Europe and secure economic prosperity for America. Their program, which became known as multilateralism, called for reduced quotas on imports, lowered tariffs, the abandonment of currency exchange controls, and economic decision making by international bodies. Randall Woods explores this attempt to create an interdependent world economy and sets it against the broader political and strategic backdrop of the period. In the United States, multilateralism attracted New Deal liberals because it proposed to help not only the established economic interests but traditionally disadvantaged groups such as farmers and industrial workers as well. Moderate socialists in Britain also lent their support to a liberalized trading system, as did many conservatives on both sides of the Atlantic, believing that the program would preserve some degree of free enterprise in the international economy. Unfortunately for its disciples, Woods argues, multilateralism was so modified by the forces of isolationism and economic nationalism_and by bureaucratic politics in the United States_that it failed to achieve its economic and strategic goals. The international economy that emerged after World War II was not an equitable partnership and merely finalized the fifty-year process by which the United States supplanted Great Britain as the arbiter of Western Capitalism. In the end, modified multilateralism hampered rather than facilitated the free flow of goods and capital, and it did little to promote social democracy.
Posted in History

Bourgeois Utopias

The Rise And Fall Of Suburbia

Author: Robert Fishman

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0786722843

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 7145

A noted urban historian traces the story of the suburb from its origins in nineteenth-century London to its twentieth-century demise in decentralized cities like Los Angeles.
Posted in Social Science

Post-War Planning on the Periphery

Author: Thomas C Mills

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748668101

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 2944

This book provides readers with an insight to a previously unexplored aspect of Anglo-American economic diplomacy during the Second World War.
Posted in Political Science

The Rise and Fall of Weimar Democracy

Author: Hans Mommsen

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807847213

Category: History

Page: 604

View: 7279

In this definitive analysis of the Weimar Republic, Hans Mommsen surveys the political, social, and economic development of Germany between the end of World War I and the appointment of Adolf Hitler as chancellor in 1933. His assessment of the German expe
Posted in History