The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America

Author: Eric P. KAUFMANN,Eric P Kaufmann

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674039386

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 6662

Posted in History

The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America

Author: Eric P. KAUFMANN,Eric P.. Kaufmann,Professor of Politics Eric P Kaufmann

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674013032

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 8825

As the 2000 census demonstrated, the Anglo-Protestant ethnic core of the U.S. has all but dissolved. This demographic shift has spawned a "culture war" within white America. Kaufmann traces the conflict's roots from the rise of WASP America to its fall in the 1960s, when social institutions finally began to reflect the nation's ethnic composition.
Posted in History

Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?

Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Eric Kaufmann

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847651941

Category: Religion

Page: 330

View: 9201

Dawkins and Hitchens have convinced many western intellectuals that secularism is the way forward. But most people don't read their books before deciding whether to be religious. Instead, they inherit their faith from their parents, who often innoculate them against the elegant arguments of secularists. And what no one has noticed is that far from declining, the religious are expanding their share of the population: in fact, the more religious people are, the more children they have. The cumulative effect of immigration from religious countries, and religious fertility will be to reverse the secularisation process in the West. Not only will the religious eventually triumph over the non-religious, but it is those who are the most extreme in their beliefs who have the largest families. Within Judaism, the Ultra-Orthodox may achieve majority status over their liberal counterparts by mid-century. Islamist Muslims have won the culture war in much of the Muslim world, and their success provides a glimpse of what awaits the Christian West and Israel. Based on a wealth of demographic research, considering questions of multiculturalism and terrorism, Kaufmann examines the implications of the decline in liberal secularism as religious conservatism rises - and what this means for the future of western modernity.
Posted in Religion

Whiteshift

Populism, Immigration, and the Future of White Majorities

Author: Eric Kaufmann

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781468316971

Category: Political Science

Page: 496

View: 794

Across the West, anti-immigration populists are tearing a path through the usual politics of left and right. Immigration is remaking Europe and North America: over half of American babies are non-white, and by the end of the century, minorities and those of mixed race are projected to form the majority in many countries. We are in the midst of a transition phase where the left-right distinction is being overshadowed by a culture war pitting whites who dislike diversity against those who embrace it. Ethnic transformation will continue, but conservative whites are unlikely to exit quietly; their feelings of alienation are already redrawing political lines and convulsing societies across the West. Drawing on detailed and extraordinary survey, demographic, and electoral data and enriched with illustrative stories, Whiteshift explores the majority response to ethnic change in Western Europe, North America, and Australasia. Eric Kaufmann, a leading expert on immigration, calls for us to move beyond empty and partisan talk about national identity and open up debate about the future of white majorities. He argues that we must ditch the "diversity myth" that whites will dwindle, replacing it with the concept of whiteshift--a new story of majority transformation that can help lift anxieties and heal today's widening political divisions. A bold, original work, Whiteshift will redefine the way we think about ethnic diversity and populism.
Posted in Political Science

The Rise and Fall of the European Defence Community

Anglo-American Relations and the Crisis of European Defence, 1950-55

Author: K. Ruane

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230599087

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 4647

Using the European Defence Community (EDC) as a case-study, this book examines the competing and often conflicting view of the British and American governments towards European integration in the early 1950s. The British, fearing an 'agonizing reappraisal' of the American defence commitment to Europe if the supranational EDC failed, went to great lengths to ensure the success of the scheme. When, despite these efforts, the EDC finally collapsed in August 1954, NATO was plunged into arguably the most severe crisis in its history. The crisis also possessed an Anglo-American dimension, with London and Washington badly divided on how it should be resolved. In the end, the British were instrumental in the creation of the Western European Union as a successor to the EDC. Their crisis management, however, had been rooted in fear of the 'agonizing reappraisal', a danger dismissed by many historians as exaggerated but which the British, in 1954, were perhaps right to take seriously.
Posted in History

A Century of War

Anglo-American Oil Politics and the New World Order

Author: F. William Engdahl

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781615774920

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 333

View: 943

This Book is a Gripping Account of the Murky World of the Anglo-American Oil Industry and its Hidden Role in World Politics. William Engdahl takes the reader through the history of how seven giant oil companies - five American and two British - developed a controlling grip on the world's economy unprecedented in history. This is no ordinary history of oil. It is a history of global politics, more precisely of global geopolitics - how control of strategic geographical pivot regions first British and later American interests to control in large part the world economy. The book sheds light for the first time on such events as the 1973 oil shock - a sudden 400% rise in the price of the world's most essential commodity in a matter of weeks. What William Engdahl reveals, with flawless documentation, will shock most people. The implications are even more devastating. He also documents how oil played an essential role in the ultimate collapse of the Soviet Union, in the rise and fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan, in the US occupation of Iraq and countless other events not normally understood in such a light. Contents: Ch. 1. The Three Pillars of the British Empire. Ch. 2. The Lines are Drawn: Germany and the Geopolitics of the Great War. Ch. 3. A Global Fight for Control of Petroleum Begins. Ch. 4. Oil Becomes the Weapon, the Near East the Battleground. Ch. 5.Combined & Conflicting Goals: U.S. Rivals Britain. Ch. 6. The Anglo-Americans Close Ranks. Ch. 7. Oil and a New World Order of Bretton Woods. Ch, 8. A Sterling Crisis and the Adenauer-de Gaulle Threat. Ch. 9. Running the World Economy in Reverse: Who Made the 1970's Oil Shocks? Ch. 10. Europe, Japan and a Response to the Oil Shock. Ch. 11. Imposing the New World Order. Ch. 12. From Evil Empire to the Axis of Evil. Ch. 13. A New Millennium for Oil Geopolitics.
Posted in Business & Economics

Spies

The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America

Author: John Earl Haynes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300155727

Category: Espionage, Soviet

Page: 650

View: 7981

This stunning book, based on KGB archives that have never come to light before, provides the most complete account of Soviet espionage in America ever written. In 1993, former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev was permitted unique access to Stalin-era records of Soviet intelligence operations against the United States. Years later, living in Britain, Vassiliev retrieved his extensive notebooks of transcribed documents from Moscow.With these notebooks John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr have meticulously constructed a new, sometimes shocking, historical account.Along with general insights into espionage tactics and the motives of Americans who spied for Stalin, "Spies" resolves specific, long-seething controversies. The book confirms, among many other things, that Alger Hiss cooperated with Soviet intelligence over a long period of years, that journalist I. F. Stone worked on behalf of the KGB in the 1930s, and that Robert Oppenheimer was never recruited by Soviet intelligence. "Spies" also uncovers numerous American spies who were never even under suspicion and satisfyingly identifies the last unaccounted for American nuclear spies. Vassiliev tells the story of the notebooks and his own extraordinary life in a gripping introduction to the volume.
Posted in Espionage, Soviet

Bourgeois Utopias

The Rise And Fall Of Suburbia

Author: Robert Fishman

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0786722843

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 6532

A noted urban historian traces the story of the suburb from its origins in nineteenth-century London to its twentieth-century demise in decentralized cities like Los Angeles.
Posted in Social Science

Replenishing the Earth

The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Angloworld

Author: James Belich

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 019161971X

Category: Political Science

Page: 586

View: 5145

Why are we speaking English? Replenishing the Earth gives a new answer to that question, uncovering a 'settler revolution' that took place from the early nineteenth century that led to the explosive settlement of the American West and its forgotten twin, the British West, comprising the settler dominions of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Between 1780 and 1930 the number of English-speakers rocketed from 12 million in 1780 to 200 million, and their wealth and power grew to match. Their secret was not racial, or cultural, or institutional superiority but a resonant intersection of historical changes, including the sudden rise of mass transfer across oceans and mountains, a revolutionary upward shift in attitudes to emigration, the emergence of a settler 'boom mentality', and a late flowering of non-industrial technologies -wind, water, wood, and work animals - especially on settler frontiers. This revolution combined with the Industrial Revolution to transform settlement into something explosive - capable of creating great cities like Chicago and Melbourne and large socio-economies in a single generation. When the great settler booms busted, as they always did, a second pattern set in. Links between the Anglo-wests and their metropolises, London and New York, actually tightened as rising tides of staple products flowed one way and ideas the other. This 're-colonization' re-integrated Greater America and Greater Britain, bulking them out to become the superpowers of their day. The 'Settler Revolution' was not exclusive to the Anglophone countries - Argentina, Siberia, and Manchuria also experienced it. But it was the Anglophone settlers who managed to integrate frontier and metropolis most successfully, and it was this that gave them the impetus and the material power to provide the world's leading super-powers for the last 200 years. This book will reshape understandings of American, British, and British dominion histories in the long 19th century. It is a story that has such crucial implications for the histories of settler societies, the homelands that spawned them, and the indigenous peoples who resisted them, that their full histories cannot be written without it.
Posted in Political Science

Political Demography

How Population Changes Are Reshaping International Security and National Politics

Author: Jack A. Goldstone,Eric P. Kaufmann,Monica Duffy Toft

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199945969

Category: Political Science

Page: 342

View: 4067

The field of political demography - the politics of population change - is dramatically underrepresented in political science. At a time when demographic changes - aging in the rich world, youth bulges in the developing world, ethnic and religious shifts, migration, and urbanization - are waxing as never before, this neglect is especially glaring and starkly contrasts with the enormous interest coming from policymakers and the media. "Ten years ago, [demography] was hardly on the radar screen," remarks Richard Jackson and Neil Howe of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, two contributors to this volume. "Today," they continue, "it dominates almost any discussion of America's long-term fiscal, economic, or foreign-policy direction." Demography is the most predictable of the social sciences: children born in the last five years will be the new workers, voters, soldiers, and potential insurgents of 2025 and the political elites of the 2050s. Whether in the West or the developing world, political scientists urgently need to understand the tectonics of demography in order to grasp the full context of today's political developments. This book begins to fill the gap from a global and historical perspective and with the hope that scholars and policymakers will take its insights on board to develop enlightened policies for our collective future.
Posted in Political Science

The Rise and Fall of the Choctaw Republic

Author: Angie Debo

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806112473

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 6466

Records the history of the Choctaw Indians through their political, social, and economic customs.
Posted in History

The Rise and Fall of the American Empire

A Re-Interpretation of History, Economics and Philosophy: 1492-2006

Author: Rocky M. Mirza

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1425113834

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 1888

Dr. Mirza's unorthodox but refreshing look at the history of the US and its failure to plant true democracy at home or abroad goes a long way towards explaining its failed invasion of Iraq.
Posted in History

The Rise and Decline of American Religious Freedom

Author: Steven D. Smith

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674730135

Category: Law

Page: 240

View: 6643

Familiar accounts of religious freedom in the United States often tell a story of visionary founders who broke from centuries-old patterns of Christendom to establish a political arrangement committed to secular and religiously neutral government. These novel commitments were supposedly embodied in the religion clauses of the First Amendment. But this story is largely a fairytale, Steven Smith says in this incisive examination of a much-mythologized subject. The American achievement was not a rejection of Christian commitments but a retrieval of classic Christian ideals of freedom of the church and of conscience. Smith maintains that the First Amendment was intended merely to preserve the political status quo in matters of religion. America's distinctive contribution was, rather, a commitment to open contestation between secularist and providentialist understandings of the nation which evolved over the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century, far from vindicating constitutional principles, as conventional wisdom suggests, the Supreme Court imposed secular neutrality, which effectively repudiated this commitment to open contestation. Instead of upholding what was distinctively American and constitutional, these decisions subverted it. The negative consequences are visible today in the incoherence of religion clause jurisprudence and the intense culture wars in American politics.
Posted in Law

The Godwins

The Rise and Fall of a Noble Dynasty

Author: Frank Barlow

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317868102

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 4350

The family of Earl Godwin of Wessex stands among the most famous in English history, whose most famous son was King Harold. Frank Barlow charts the family through to Harold – the last Anglo-Saxon king – and finally the crowning of William the Conqueror during the Norman Conquest. Set against the backdrop of Viking raids and ultimately the Norman Conquest of 1066, Frank Barlow unravels the gripping history of a feuding family that nevertheless determined the course and fortunes of all the English.
Posted in History

Empire of the Summer Moon

Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Author: S. C. Gwynne

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416597158

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 5842

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize This stunning historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West was a major New York Times bestseller. In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S. C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the “White Squaw” who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.
Posted in History

The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism

A Short History

Author: David Farber

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400834295

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 3448

The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism tells the gripping story of perhaps the most significant political force of our time through the lives and careers of six leading figures at the heart of the movement. David Farber traces the history of modern conservatism from its revolt against New Deal liberalism, to its breathtaking resurgence under Ronald Reagan, to its spectacular defeat with the election of Barack Obama. Farber paints vivid portraits of Robert Taft, William F. Buckley Jr., Barry Goldwater, Phyllis Schlafly, Ronald Reagan, and George W. Bush. He shows how these outspoken, charismatic, and frequently controversial conservative leaders were united by a shared insistence on the primacy of social order, national security, and economic liberty. Farber demonstrates how they built a versatile movement capable of gaining and holding power, from Taft's opposition to the New Deal to Buckley's founding of the National Review as the intellectual standard-bearer of modern conservatism; from Goldwater's crusade against leftist politics and his failed 1964 bid for the presidency to Schlafly's rejection of feminism in favor of traditional gender roles and family values; and from Reagan's city upon a hill to conservatism's downfall with Bush's ambitious presidency. The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism provides rare insight into how conservatives captured the American political imagination by claiming moral superiority, downplaying economic inequality, relishing bellicosity, and embracing nationalism. This concise and accessible history reveals how these conservative leaders discovered a winning formula that enabled them to forge a powerful and formidable political majority. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
Posted in History

The Triple Package

What Really Determines Success

Author: Jed Rubenfeld,Amy Chua

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408852225

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 4545

Why do Jews win so many Nobel Prizes and Pulitzer Prizes? Why are Mormons running the business and finance sectors? Why do the children of even impoverished and poorly educated Chinese immigrants excel so remarkably at school? It may be taboo to say it, but some cultural groups starkly outperform others. The bestselling husband and wife team Amy Chua, author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, and Jed Rubenfeld, author of The Interpretation of Murder, reveal the three essential components of success – its hidden spurs, inner dynamics and its potentially damaging costs – showing how, ultimately, when properly understood and harnessed, the Triple Package can put anyone on their chosen path to success.
Posted in Science

Flawed Capitalism

The Anglo-American Condition and Its Resolution

Author: David Coates

Publisher: Building Progressive Alternatives

ISBN: 9781911116332

Category:

Page: 288

View: 7770

Flawed Capitalism traces the history of the U.S. and UK economies through their New Deal and then Reaganite and Thatcherite periods, showing how the weakening of labor and deregulation of business culminated in the financial crisis. David Coates makes the case for the transatlantic creation of a new social settlement--a less flawed capitalism.
Posted in

Offa and the Mercian Wars

Author: Chris Peers

Publisher: Pen & Sword Books

ISBN: 9781526711502

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6998

In England in the eighth century, in the midst of the so-called Dark Ages, Offa ruled Mercia, one of the strongest Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. For over 30 years he was the dominant warlord in the territory south of the Humber and the driving force behind the expansion of Mercia's power. During that turbulent period he commanded Mercian armies in their struggle against the neighboring kingdoms of Northumbria and Wessex and against the Welsh tribes. Yet the true story of Offa's long reign and of the rise and fall of Mercia are little known although this is one of the most intriguing episodes in this little-recorded phase of England's past. It is Chris Peers's task in this new study to uncover the facts about Offa and the other Mercian kings and to set them in the context of English history before the coming of the Danes.
Posted in History