The Rescue and Achievement of Refugee Scholars

The Story of Displaced Scholars and Scientists 1933–1952

Author: N. Bentwich

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401177481

Category: History

Page: 107

View: 4480

This little book has been written at the suggestion of the Society for the Protection of Science and Learning. That body was the successor of the Academic Assistance Council which was formed in 1933 by heads of British Universities and learned Societies to assist scholars and scientists and investigators "who, on grounds of religion, political opinion or race, were unable to carryon their work in their own country". They were, at the time of the formation of the Society, particularly, but not exclusively, refugees from Nazi oppression, and deprived of their academic posts on one of these grounds. But they soon embraced refugees from other tyrannies. The British example was followed by similar efforts in many countries. The National and International effort, initiated in 1933 on behalf of academic freedom, is still far from completed. For the persecution of free thought and research has become an endemic ill of our time, and calls for a continuous activity of the free Universities. The major task, however, of saving for science and scholar ship the victims of Nazi persecution has been accomplished, and most of the academic societies which were formed in the Thirties to take up the challenge have been dissolved. It seems opportune then to place on record this effort of cultural soli darity for the displaced scholars, and the contribution which has been made to the world's intellectual life by those who were rescued.
Posted in History

Ark of Civilization

Refugee Scholars and Oxford University, 1930-1945

Author: Sally Crawford,Katharina Ulmschneider,Jas Elsner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199687552

Category:

Page: 416

View: 2713

In the opening decades of the twentieth century, Germany was at the cutting edge of arts and humanities scholarship across Europe. However, when many of its key thinkers--leaders in their fields in classics, philosophy, archaeology, art history, and oriental studies--were forced to flee to England following the rise of the Nazi regime, Germany's loss became Oxford's gain. From the mid-1930s onwards, Oxford could accurately be described as an "ark of knowledge" of western civilization: a place where ideas about art, culture, and history could be rescued, developed, and disseminated freely. The city's history as a place of refuge for scientists who were victims of Nazi oppression is by now familiar, but the story of its role as a sanctuary for cultural heritage, though no less important, has received much less attention. In this volume, the impact of Oxford as a shelter, a meeting point, and a center of thought in the arts and humanities specifically is addressed, by looking both at those who sought refuge there and stayed, and those whose lives intersected with Oxford at crucial moments before and during the war. Although not every great refugee can be discussed in detail in this volume, this study offers an introduction to the unique conjunction of place, people, and time that shaped Western intellectual history, exploring how the meeting of minds enabled by libraries, publishing houses, and the University allowed Oxford's refugee scholars to have a profound and lasting impact on the development of British culture. Drawing on oral histories, previously unpublished letters, and archives, it illuminates and interweaves both personal and global histories to demonstrate how, for a short period during the war, Oxford brought together some of the greatest minds of the age to become the custodians of a great European civilization.
Posted in

Where the Wind Leads

A Refugee Family's Miraculous Story of Loss, Rescue, and Redemption

Author: Dr. Vinh Chung

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ISBN: 084992295X

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 4579

Back Cover: “The account of Dr. Chung and his family will inspire you to believe in second chances and miracles and the God who gives them both.” -Max Lucado, New York Times best-selling author My name is Vinh Chung. This is a story that spans two continents, ten decades, and eleven thousand miles. When I was three and a half years old, my family was forced to flee Vietnam in June 1979, a place we had never heard of somewhere in the heartland of America. Several weeks later my family lay half-dead from dehydration in a derelict fishing boat jammed with ninety-three refugees lost in the middle of the South China Sea. We arrived in the United States with nothing but the clothes on our backs and unable to speak a single word of English. Today my family holds twenty-one university degrees. How we got from there to here is quite a story. Where the Wind Leads is the remarkable account of Vinh Chung and his refugee family’s daring escape from communist oppression for the chance of a better life in America. It’s a story of personal sacrifice, redemption, endurance against almost insurmountable odds, and what it truly means to be American. All author royalties from the sale of this book will go to benefit World Vision. Flap Copy: Vinh Chung was born in South Vietnam, just eight months after it fell to the communists in 1975. His family was wealthy, controlling a rice-milling empire worth millions; but within months of the communist takeover, the Chungs lost everything and were reduced to abject poverty. Knowing that their children would have no future under the new government, the Chungs decided to flee the country. In 1979, they joined the legendary “boat people” and sailed into the South China Sea, despite knowing that an estimated two hundred thousand of their countrymen had already perished at the hands of brutal pirates and violent seas. Where the Wind Leads follows Vinh Chung and his family on their desperate journey from pre-war Vietnam, through pirate attacks on a lawless sea, to a miraculous rescue and a new home in the unlikely town of Fort Smith, Arkansas. There Vinh struggled against poverty, discrimination, and a bewildering language barrier—yet still managed to graduate from Harvard Medical School. Where the Wind Leads is Vinh’s tribute to the courage and sacrifice of his parents, a testimony to his family’s faith, and a reminder to people everywhere that the American dream, while still possible, carries with it a greater responsibility.
Posted in Religion

Rescue Board

The Untold Story of America's Efforts to Save the Jews of Europe

Author: Rebecca Erbelding

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: 0385542526

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1183

America has long been criticized for refusing to give harbor to the Jews of Europe as Hitler and the Nazis closed in. Now a U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum scholar tells the extraordinary story of the War Refugee Board, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's little-known effort late in the war to save the Jews who remained. In January 1944, a young Treasury lawyer named John Pehle accompanied his boss to a meeting with the president. For more than a decade, the Jews of Germany had sought refuge in the United States and had been stymied by Congress's harsh immigration policy. Now the State Department was refusing to authorize relief funds Pehle wanted to use to help Jews escape Nazi territory. At the meeting, Pehle made his best case--and prevailed. Within days, FDR created the War Refugee Board, empowering it to rescue the victims of Nazi persecution, and put John Pehle in charge. Over the next twenty months, Pehle pulled together a team of D.C. pencil pushers, international relief workers, smugglers, diplomats, millionaires, and rabble-rousers to run operations across four continents and a dozen countries. Together, they tricked the Nazis, forged identity papers, maneuvered food and medicine into concentration camps, recruited spies, leaked news stories, laundered money, negotiated ransoms, and funneled millions of dollars into Europe. They bought weapons for the French Resistance and sliced red tape to allow Jewish refugees to escape to Palestine. Altogether, they saved tens of thousands of lives. For Rescue Board, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum scholar Rebecca Erbelding undertook a decade of research and uncovered new archival materials to tell the dramatic unknown story of America's last-ditch effort to save the Jews of Europe.
Posted in History

An Irish Sanctuary

German-speaking Refugees in Ireland 1933–1945

Author: Gisela Holfter,Horst Dickel

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110351455

Category: History

Page: 461

View: 8092

The monograph provides the first comprehensive, detailed account of German-speaking refugees in Ireland 1933-1945 - where they came from, immigration policy towards them and how their lives turned out in Ireland and afterwards. Thanks to unprecedented access to thousands of files of the Irish Department of Justice (all still officially closed) as well as extensive archive research in Ireland, Germany, England, Austria as well as the US and numerous interviews it is possible for the first time to give an almost complete overview of how many people came, how they contributed to Ireland, how this fits in with the history of migration to Ireland and what can be learned from it. While Exile studies are a well-developed research area and have benefited from the work of research centres and archives in Germany, Austria, Great Britain and the USA (Frankfurt/M, Leipzig, Hamburg, Berlin, Innsbruck, Graz, Vienna, London and SUNY Albany and the Leo Baeck Institutes), Ireland was long neglected in this regard. Instead of the usual narrative of "no one was let in" or "only a handful came to Ireland" the authors identified more than 300 refugees through interviews and intensive research in Irish, German and Austrian archives. German-speaking exiles were the first main group of immigrants that came to the young Irish Free State from 1933 onwards and they had a considerable impact on academic, industrial and religious developments in Ireland.
Posted in History

Whitehall and the Jews, 1933-1948

British Immigration Policy, Jewish Refugees and the Holocaust

Author: Louise London

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521534499

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 7770

The fullest study yet of the British response to European Jewry under Nazism.
Posted in History

Ark of Civilization

Refugee Scholars and Oxford University, 1930-1945

Author: Sally Crawford,Katharina Ulmschneider,Jas' Elsner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191511331

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 1503

In the opening decades of the twentieth century, Germany was at the cutting edge of arts and humanities scholarship across Europe. However, when many of its key thinkers - leaders in their fields in classics, philosophy, archaeology, art history, and oriental studies - were forced to flee to England following the rise of the Nazi regime, Germany's loss became Oxford's gain. From the mid-1930s onwards, Oxford could accurately be described as an 'ark of knowledge' of western civilization: a place where ideas about art, culture, and history could be rescued, developed, and disseminated freely. The city's history as a place of refuge for scientists who were victims of Nazi oppression is by now familiar, but the story of its role as a sanctuary for cultural heritage, though no less important, has received much less attention. In this volume, the impact of Oxford as a shelter, a meeting point, and a centre of thought in the arts and humanities specifically is addressed, by looking both at those who sought refuge there and stayed, and those whose lives intersected with Oxford at crucial moments before and during the war. Although not every great refugee can be discussed in detail in this volume, this study offers an introduction to the unique conjunction of place, people, and time that shaped Western intellectual history, exploring how the meeting of minds enabled by libraries, publishing houses, and the University allowed Oxford's refugee scholars to have a profound and lasting impact on the development of British culture. Drawing on oral histories, previously unpublished letters, and archives, it illuminates and interweaves both personal and global histories to demonstrate how, for a short period during the war, Oxford brought together some of the greatest minds of the age to become the custodians of a great European civilization.
Posted in Social Science

The Vietnamese Boat People, 1954 and 1975-1992

Author: Nghia M. Vo

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786482494

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 5086

"Here is a history of Vietnamese diasporas, chronologically arranged from 1954 to post-1975. Everything that affected the escapees, from pirates to refugee camps, is analyzed. International responses are covered, beginning with Vietnam's neighbors who ref
Posted in History

Refugees from Nazi Germany in the Netherlands 1933–1940

Author: R. Moore

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400943687

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 2093

My interest in the 'refugee question' of the 1930s stemmed initially from time spent as an undergraduate at Manchester University, an interest which has been expanded, via a doctoral thesis, to the writing of this book. In wri ting about the German and Austrian refugees who fled to the Netherlands before the country was occupied in May 1940, the main aim has been to re turn the 'refugee question' of the 1930s into its pre-war context,a context from which it has often been dragged to provide an introduction to the events of the war period and the policies carried out by the Germans in oc cupied Europe. A study of the Netherlands provides the opportunity to look at refugees as a whole, not just as Jews, social democrats or communists, and also to examine the reaction and response of an European government to what was essentially a unique problem. I take great pleasure in recording my gratitude to the many people who have helped me in the course of my work. To the Dutch Ministerie van On derwijs en Wetenschappen and the Twenty-Seven Foundation for grants which enabled me to spend time in the Netherlands completing the research for this project, and to the British Acadamy for their financial assistance with publication costs. The research for this book took me to many libraries and archives in a number of countries.
Posted in History

The Turbulent Decade

Confronting the Refugee Crises of the 1990s

Author: Sadako N. Ogata

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393057737

Category: Political Science

Page: 402

View: 8013

The United Nations high commissioner for refugees during the 1990s traces her career experiences and the lessons she learned during one of the twentieth century's greatest refugee crises, discussing issues related to protection and humanitarian assistance and the global and political climate in which humanitarian organizations operate. 15,000 first printing.
Posted in Political Science

The Making of the English Working Class

Author: E. P. Thompson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1504022173

Category: History

Page: 848

View: 3625

A history of the common people and the Industrial Revolution: “A true masterpiece” and one of the Modern Library’s 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the twentieth century (Tribune). During the formative years of the Industrial Revolution, English workers and artisans claimed a place in society that would shape the following centuries. But the capitalist elite did not form the working class—the workers shaped their own creations, developing a shared identity in the process. Despite their lack of power and the indignity forced upon them by the upper classes, the working class emerged as England’s greatest cultural and political force. Crucial to contemporary trends in all aspects of society, at the turn of the nineteenth century, these workers united into the class that we recognize all across the Western world today. E. P. Thompson’s magnum opus, The Making of the English Working Class defined early twentieth-century English social and economic history, leading many to consider him Britain’s greatest postwar historian. Its publication in 1963 was highly controversial in academia, but the work has become a seminal text on the history of the working class. It remains incredibly relevant to the social and economic issues of current times, with the Guardian saying upon the book’s fiftieth anniversary that it “continues to delight and inspire new readers.”
Posted in History

The response of Orthodox Jewry in the United States to the Holocaust

the activities of the Vaad ha-Hatzala Rescue Committee, 1939-1945

Author: Efraim Zuroff

Publisher: Ktav Pub Inc

ISBN: 9780881256666

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 4659

The Vaad ha-Hatzalah was established by Orthodox rabbis in the United States in 1939 to rescue European rabbis and yeshiva students. Using hitherto inaccessible documents. Dr. Zuroff chronicles the successes and failures of the Vaad, focusing on its relations with the Joint Distribution Committee and local federations throughout the United States. Its very founding was controversial, and its policy of giving priority to rabbis and yeshiva students led to bitter debates. By examining the ineffectual responses of American Jewish organizations to news of the Holocaust the book explains why Orthodox rabbis preferred to "go it alone," and even to ignore governmental regulations detrimental to their rescue efforts.
Posted in History

The Abandonment of the Jews

America and the Holocaust, 1941-1945

Author: David S. Wyman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 458

View: 5053

New paperback edition of a landmark work that remains the definitive book on America's response to the Holocaust. In addition to a new cover design and Elie Wiesel's original foreword to the 1984 edition - and his 1998 afterword - this edition includes a new preface by the author discussing recent scholarship on the American response to the Holocaust.
Posted in History

Black Jews, Jews, and Other Heroes

How Grassroots Activism Led to the Rescue of the Ethiopian Jews

Author: Howard M. Lenhoff

Publisher: Gefen Publishing House Ltd

ISBN: 9789652293657

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 324

View: 7414

Seldom has a small grass-roots organisation polarised American Jewry as did the American Association for Ethiopian Jews (AAEJ) and seldom has a grassroots organisation been so successful. How were five governments persuaded that it was to their interest to allow the threatened Jews of Ethiopia to fulfil their dream of rejoining their brethren in Israel? From 1974 through 1991, active AAEJ members demonstrated that it was possible to rescue black Jews from Africa. They enlisted the support of college students, American Rabbis, editors of the Jewish press and other Zionists. Lenhoff's memoir provides many untold stories behind this historic drama: How Israeli Ethiopian Jews and Americans Jews worked secretly to rescue over 1,000 Ethiopian Jews. How Jerry Weaver masterminded Operation Moses -- the first mass exodus of black Africans as free people -- not as slaves. How two gutsy American women set up a situation allowing Israel to rescue 14,000 Ethiopian Jews in one day of Operation Solomon. There is more: the intrigues in Israel between the politics of religion and the Law of Return; the daring heroic adventures of courageous Ethiopian Jews as they trekked from Ethiopia to Sudan. These are the stories of activists who challenged the establishment and won! Black Jews, Jews, and Other Heroes is written from the first-hand experiences of one of the AAEJ's three Presidents, scholar-activist Howard Lenhoff. Lenhoff and Gefen Publishing House are especially pleased to present also as part of this book, the untold story of "righteous gentile", Jerry Weaver.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Happiest Refugee

The Extraordinary True Story of a Boy's Journey from Starvation at Sea to Becoming One of Australia's Best-loved Comedians

Author: Anh Do

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1459616057

Category: Comedians

Page: 384

View: 5450

Anh Do nearly didn't make it to Australia. His entire family came close to losing their lives on the sea as they escaped from war-torn Vietnam in an overcrowded boat. But nothing - not murderous pirates, nor the imminent threat of death by hunger, disease or dehydration as they drifted for days - could quench their desire to make a better life in the country they had dreamed about. Life in Australia was hard, an endless succession of back-breaking work, crowded rooms, ruthless landlords and make-do everything. But there was a loving extended family, and always friends and play and something to laugh about for Anh, his brother Khoa and their sister Tram. Things got harder when their father left home when Anh was only nine - they felt his loss very deeply and their mother struggled to support the family on her own. His mother's sacrifice was an inspiration to Anh and he worked hard during his teenage years to help her make ends meet, also managing to graduate high school and then university. Another inspiration was the comedian Anh met when he was about to sign on for a 60-hour a week corporate job. Anh asked how many hours he worked. 'Four, ' the answer came back, and that was it. He was going to be a comedian! The Happiest Refugee tells the incredible, uplifting and inspiring life story of one of our favourite personalities. Tragedy, humour, heartache and unswerving determination - a big life with big dreams. Anh's story will move and amuse all who read it
Posted in Comedians

Cecilia Razovsky and the American Jewish women's rescue operations in the Second World War

Author: Bat-Ami Zucker

Publisher: Mitchell Vallentine & Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 201

View: 3298

This book highlights Jewish women's activities in the 1930s and 1940s as they were reflected in one outstanding woman Cecilia Razovsky. Her wide range of activities spanning more than fifty years and her outstanding devotion to assisting refugees and refugee children reveal her as a woman who dedicated her personal life and her professional skills to the Jewish people. Without doubt, she stands as a representative for the thousands of anonymous American-Jewish women, who made a difference. The book is based on primary sources. The Jewish-American campaign for the European refugees before and during the Second World War is commonly perceived as having been spearheaded by male leaders. Stephen Wise is the most familiar and outstanding figure among them; other frequently mentioned personalities include Cyrus Adler, Herbert Lehman, Judge Joseph Proskauer, Judge Julius Mack, and Morris Troper. Together, these leaders have been credited for their efforts to persuade the Roosevelt administr
Posted in History

Liberty's Exiles

American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World

Author: Maya Jasanoff

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1400075475

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 5617

A global history of the post-Revolutionary War exodus of 60,000 Americans loyal to the British Empire to such regions as Canada, India and Sierra Leone traces the experiences of specific individuals while challenging popular conceptions about the founding of the United States. Reprint.
Posted in History

Unsettled

Cambodian Refugees in the New York City Hyperghetto

Author: Eric Tang

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439911648

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 1447

After surviving the Khmer Rouge genocide, followed by years of confinement to international refugee camps, as many as 10,000 Southeast Asian refugees arrived in the Bronx during the 1980s and ‘90s. Unsettled chronicles the unfinished odyssey of Bronx Cambodians, closely following one woman and her family for several years as they survive yet resist their literal insertion into concentrated Bronx poverty. Eric Tang tells the harrowing and inspiring stories of these refugees to make sense of how and why the displaced migrants have been resettled in the “hyperghetto.” He argues that refuge is never found, that rescue discourses mask a more profound urban reality characterized by racialized geographic enclosure, economic displacement and unrelenting poverty, and the criminalization of daily life. Unsettled views the hyperghetto as a site of extreme isolation, punishment, and confinement. The refugees remain captives in late-capitalist urban America. Tang ultimately asks: What does it mean for these Cambodians to resettle into this distinct time and space of slavery’s afterlife?
Posted in Social Science

Citizen Refugee

Forging the Indian Nation after Partition

Author: Uditi Sen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108425615

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 8703

Explores how refugees were used as agents of nation-building in India, leading to gendered and caste-ridden policies of rehabilitation.
Posted in History

Lone Survivor

The Incredible True Story of Navy SEALs Under Siege

Author: Marcus Luttrell,Patrick Robinson

Publisher: Sphere

ISBN: 9780751555943

Category: Afghan War, 2001-

Page: 400

View: 3742

In June 2005 four US Navy SEALs left their base in Afghanistan for the Pakistani border. Their mission was to capture or kill a notorious al-Qaeda leader known to be ensconced in a Taliban stronghold surrounded by a small but heavily armed force. Less than twenty-four hours later, only one of those Navy SEALs was alive. This is the story of team leader Marcus Luttrell, the sole survivor of Operation Redwing. Blasted unconscious by a rocket grenade, blown over a cliff, but still armed and still breathing, Luttrell endured four desperate days fighting the al-Qaeda assassins sent to kill him, before finding unlikely sanctuary with a Pashtun tribe who risked everything to protect him from the circling Taliban killers.
Posted in Afghan War, 2001-