The Psychology of Overeating

Food and the Culture of Consumerism

Author: Kima Cargill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472581105

Category: Psychology

Page: 216

View: 3051

Drawing on empirical research, clinical case material and vivid examples from modern culture, The Psychology of Overeating demonstrates that overeating must be understood as part of the wider cultural problem of consumption and materialism. Highlighting modern society's pathological need to consume, Kima Cargill explores how our limitless consumer culture offers an endless array of delicious food as well as easy money whilst obscuring the long-term effects of overconsumption. The book investigates how developments in food science, branding and marketing have transformed Western diets and how the food industry employs psychology to trick us into eating more and more ? and why we let them. Drawing striking parallels between 'Big Food' and 'Big Pharma', Cargill shows how both industries use similar tactics to manufacture desire, resist regulation and convince us that the solution to overconsumption is further consumption. Real-life examples illustrate how loneliness, depression and lack of purpose help to drive consumption, and how this is attributed to individual failure rather than wider culture. The first book to introduce a clinical and existential psychology perspective into the field of food studies, Cargill's interdisciplinary approach bridges the gulf between theory and practice. Key reading for students and researchers in food studies, psychology, health and nutrition and anyone wishing to learn more about the relationship between food and consumption.
Posted in Psychology

The Psychology of Overeating

Food and the Culture of Consumerism

Author: Kima Cargill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472581083

Category: Psychology

Page: 216

View: 2754

A lively interdisciplinary text which brings together perspectives from clinical psychology and food studies to examine overeating as a contemporary cultural problem.
Posted in Psychology

The Psychology of Overeating

Food and the Culture of Consumerism

Author: Kima Cargill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472581075

Category: Psychology

Page: 216

View: 2137

A lively interdisciplinary text which brings together perspectives from clinical psychology and food studies to examine overeating as a contemporary cultural problem.
Posted in Psychology

Food Cults

How Fads, Dogma, and Doctrine Influence Diet

Author: Kima Cargill

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442251328

Category: Cooking

Page: 278

View: 2118

What do we mean when we call any group a cult? Defining that term is a slippery proposition – the word cult is provocative and arguably pejorative. Does it necessarily refer to a religious group? A group with a charismatic leader? Or something darker and more sinister? Because beliefs and practices surrounding food often inspire religious and political fervor, as well as function to unite people into insular groups, it is inevitable that "food cults" would emerge. Studying the extreme beliefs and practices of such food cults allows us to see the ways in which food serves as a nexus for religious beliefs, sexuality, death anxiety, preoccupation with the body, asceticism, and hedonism, to name a few. In contrast to religious and political cults, food cults have the added dimension of mediating cultural trends in nutrition and diet through their membership. Should we then consider raw foodists, many of whom believe that cooked food is poison, a type of food cult? What about paleo diet adherents or those who follow a restricted calorie diet for longevity? Food Cults explores these questions by looking at domestic and international, contemporary and historic food communities characterized by extreme nutritional beliefs or viewed as "fringe" movements by mainstream culture. While there are a variety of accounts of such food communities across disciplines, this collection pulls together these works and explains why we gravitate toward such groups and the social and psychological functions they serve. This volume describes how contemporary and historic food communities come together and foment fanaticism, judgment, charisma, dogma, passion, longevity, condemnation and exaltation.
Posted in Cooking

The Psychology of Eating and Drinking

Author: Alexandra W. Logue

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135067627

Category: Psychology

Page: 392

View: 9433

Choice Recommended Read This insightful, thought-provoking, and engaging book explores the truth behind how and why we eat and drink what we do. Instead of promising easy answers to eliminating picky eating or weight loss, this book approaches controversial eating and drinking issues from a more useful perspective—explaining the facts to promote understanding of our bodies. The only book to provide an educated reader with a broad, scientific understanding of these topics, The Psychology of Eating and Drinking explores basic eating and drinking processes, such as hunger and taste, as well as how these concepts influence complex topics such as eating disorders, alcohol use, and cuisine. This new edition is grounded in the most up-to-date advances in scientific research on eating and drinking behaviors and will be of interest to anyone.
Posted in Psychology

Addiction

A Disorder of Choice

Author: Gene M. Heyman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674032985

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 200

View: 4044

Argues that drug addiction is not a disease but a voluntary choice of an individual.
Posted in Health & Fitness

The Pleasure's All Mine

A History of Perverse Sex

Author: Julie Peakman

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780232039

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8312

Handcuffs, paddles, whips—the words alone are enough to make a person blush. Even by our society’s standards, the practice of things like BDSM is still very hush-hush, considered deviant sexual behavior that must be kept hidden. But the narrow view of what is thought of as “normal” sex—a vanilla act performed by one man and one woman—is more and more contested these days. And as Julie Peakman reveals, normal never really existed; for everyone, different kinds of sex have always offered myriad pleasures, and almost all sexual behaviors have traveled between acceptance and proscription. The Pleasure’s All Mine examines two millennia of letters, diaries, court records, erotic books, medical texts, and more to explore the gamut of “deviant” sexual activity. Delving into the specialized cultures of pain, necrophilia, and bestiality and the social world of plushies, furries, and life-size sex dolls, Peakman considers the changing attitudes toward these, as well as masturbation, “golden showers,” sadomasochism, homosexuals, transvestites, and transsexuals. She follows the history of each behavior through its original reception to its interpretation by sexologists and how it is viewed today, showing how previously acceptable behaviors now provoke social outrage, or vice versa. In addition, she questions why people have been and remain intolerant of other people’s sexual preferences. The first comprehensive history of sexual perversion and packed with both color and black and white images, The Pleasure’s All Mine is a fascinating and sometimes shocking look at the evolution of our views on sex.
Posted in History

Temptation

Finding Self-Control in an Age of Excess

Author: Daniel Akst

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101559306

Category: Self-Help

Page: 320

View: 4433

" This elegantly written and useful book . . . describes how, for millennia, human beings have struggled to rein in desire." -USA Today At a time when the fallout from reckless spending and unrestrained consumption is fueling a national malaise, Daniel Akst delivers a witty and comprehensive investigation of the central problem of our time: how to save ourselves from what we want. Temptation reminds us that while more calories, sex, and intoxicants are readily available than ever before, crucial social constraints have eroded, creating a world that sorely tests the limits of human willpower. Referencing history, literature, psychology, philosophy, and economics, Akst draws a vivid picture of the many-sided problem of desire-and delivers a blueprint for how we can steer shrewdly away from a campaign of self-destruction.
Posted in Self-Help

I Shop, Therefore I Am

Compulsive Buying and the Search for Self

Author: April Lane Benson

Publisher: Jason Aronson

ISBN: 9780765702425

Category: Psychology

Page: 528

View: 8347

This volume examines a rapidly emerging public health problem, compulsive buying disorder, characterized by an obsession with shopping and buying behavior that causes adverse consequences. The editor defines the syndrome of compulsive consumption, examines the range and variations within it, discusses assessment and associated disorders, and delineates successful treatment modalities. It offers insights from a broad spectrum of therapies: psychopharmacology, psychodynamic therapy, cognitive-behavioral treatment, couples and group therapy, self-help, and financial counseling.
Posted in Psychology

Baba Yaga

The Ambiguous Mother and Witch of the Russian Folktale

Author: Andreas Johns

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9780820467696

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 356

View: 6935

Baba Yaga is a well-known witch from the folklore tradition of Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. A fascinating and colorful character, she resembles witches of other traditions but is in many ways unique. Living in the forest in a hut that stands and moves on chicken legs, she travels in a mortar with a pestle and sweeps away her tracks with a broom. In some tales she tries to harm the protagonist, while in others she is helpful. This book investigates the image and ambiguity of Baba Yaga in detail and considers the meanings she has for East Slavic culture. Providing a broad survey of folktales and other sources, it is the most thorough study of Baba Yaga yet published and will be of interest to students of anthropology, comparative literature, folklore, and Slavic and East European studies.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Diet and the Disease of Civilization

Author: Adrienne Rose Bitar

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813589665

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 5814

Diet books contribute to a $60-billion industry as they speak to the 45 million Americans who diet every year. Yet these books don’t just tell readers what to eat: they offer complete philosophies about who Americans are and how we should live. Diet and the Disease of Civilization interrupts the predictable debate about eating right to ask a hard question: what if it’s not calories—but concepts—that should be counted? Cultural critic Adrienne Rose Bitar reveals how four popular diets retell the “Fall of Man” as the narrative backbone for our national consciousness. Intensifying the moral panic of the obesity epidemic, they depict civilization itself as a disease and offer diet as the one true cure. Bitar reads each diet—the Paleo Diet, the Garden of Eden Diet, the Pacific Island Diet, the detoxification or detox diet—as both myth and manual, a story with side effects shaping social movements, driving industry, and constructing fundamental ideas about sickness and health. Diet and the Disease of Civilization unearths the ways in which diet books are actually utopian manifestos not just for better bodies, but also for a healthier society and a more perfect world.
Posted in Social Science

The Hungry Years

Confessions of a Food Addict

Author: William Leith

Publisher: Anchor Canada

ISBN: 0385672926

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 7577

“Hunger is the loudest voice in my head. I’m hungry most of the time.” William Leith began the eighties slim; by the end of that decade he had packed on an uncomfortable amount of weight. In the early nineties, he was slim again, but his weight began to creep up once more. On January 20th, 2003, he woke up on the fattest day of his life. That same day he left London for New York to interview controversial diet guru Dr. Robert Atkins. But what was meant to be a routine journalistic assignment set Leith on an intensely personal and illuminating journey into the mysteries of hunger and addiction. From his many years as a journalist, Leith knows that being fat is something people find more difficult to talk about than nearly anything else. But in The Hungry Years he does precisely that. Leith uses his own pathological relationship with food as a starting point and reveals himself, driven to the kitchen first thing in the morning to inhale slice after slice of buttered toast, wracked by a physical and emotional need that only food can satisfy. He travels through fast food-scented airports and coffee shops as he explores the all-encompassing power of advertising and the unattainable notions of physical perfection that feed the multibillion dollar diet industry. Fat has been called a feminist issue: William Leith’s unblinking look at the physical consequences and psychological pain of being an overweight man charts fascinating new territory for everyone who has ever had a craving or counted a calorie. The Hungry Years is a story of food, fat, and addiction that is both funny and heartwrenching. I was sitting in a café on the corner of 3rd Avenue and 24th Street in Manhattan, holding a menu. I was overweight. In fact, I was fat. Like millions of other people, I had entered into a pathological relationship with food, and with my own body. For years I had desperately wanted to write about why this had happened — not just to me, but to all those other people as well. I knew it had a lot to do with food. But I also knew it was connected to all sorts of outside forces. If I could understand what had happened to me, I could tell people what had happened to them, too. Right there and then, I decided that I would do everything to discover why I had got fat. I would look at every angle. And then I would lose weight, and report back from the slim world. —Excerpt from The Hungry Years From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Inhuman Networks

Social Media and the Archaeology of Connection

Author: Grant Bollmer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1501316168

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 8978

Social media's connectivity is often thought to be a manifestation of human nature buried until now, revealed only through the diverse technologies of the participatory internet. Rather than embrace this view, Inhuman Networks: Social Media and the Archaeology of Connection argues that the human nature revealed by social media imagines network technology and data as models for behavior online. Covering a wide range of historical and interdisciplinary subjects, Grant Bollmer examines the emergence of "the networkÂ?? as a model for relation in the 1700s and 1800s and follows it through marginal, often forgotten articulations of technology, biology, economics, and the social. From this history, Bollmer examines contemporary controversies surrounding social media, extending out to the influence of network models on issues of critical theory, politics, popular science, and neoliberalism. By moving through the past and present of network media, Inhuman Networks demonstrates how contemporary network culture unintentionally repeats debates over the limits of Western modernity to provide an idealized future where "the humanÂ?? is interchangeable with abstract, flowing data connected through well-managed, distributed networks.
Posted in Social Science

The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology

Author: Michael I. Norton,Derek D. Rucker,Cait Lamberton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 131641616X

Category: Psychology

Page: N.A

View: 9497

Why do consumers make the purchases they do, and which ones make them truly happy? Why are consumers willing to spend huge sums of money to appear high status? This Handbook addresses these key questions and many more. It provides a comprehensive overview of consumer psychology, examining cutting-edge research at the individual, interpersonal, and societal levels. Leading scholars summarize past and current findings, and consider future lines of inquiry to deepen our understanding of the psychology behind consumers' decision making, their interactions with other consumers, and the effects of societal factors on consumption. The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology will act as a valuable guide for faculty as well as graduate and undergraduate students in psychology, marketing, management, sociology, and anthropology.
Posted in Psychology

The Psychology of Eating

From Healthy to Disordered Behavior

Author: Jane Ogden

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444358375

Category: Psychology

Page: 392

View: 6148

With its primary focus on the psychology of eating from a social, health, and clinical perspective, the second edition of The Psychology of Eating: From Healthy to Disordered Behavior presents an overview of the latest research into a wide range of eating-related behaviors Features the most up-to-date research relating to eating behavior Integrates psychological knowledge with several other disciplines Written in a lively, accessible style Supplemented with illustrations and maps to make literature more approachable
Posted in Psychology

A Psychology of Food

More Than a Matter of Taste

Author: B. Lyman

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401170339

Category: Psychology

Page: 190

View: 8734

Writing this book has been a pleasure, but it has also been frustrating. It was a delight to see that the facts of food preferences, eating, and food behavior conform in many ways to the general principles of psychology. Matching these, however, was often like putting together a jigsaw puz zle-looking at a fact and trying to figure out which psychological theories or principles were relevant. This was made more difficult by conflicting principles in psychology and contradictory findings in psychological as well as food-preference research. The material cited is not meant to be exhaustive. Undoubtedly, I have been influenced by my own research interests and points of view. When conflicting data exist, I selected those that seemed to me most representa tive or relevant, and I have done so without consistently pointing out contrary findings. This applies also to the discussion of psychological prin ciples. Much psychological research is done in very restrictive conditions. Therefore, it has limited applicability beyond the confines of the context in which it was conducted. What holds true of novelty, complexity, and curiosity when two-dimensional line drawings are studied, for example, may not have much to do with novelty, complexity, and curiosity in rela tion to foods, which vary in many ways such as shape, color, taste, texture, and odor. Nevertheless, I have tried to suggest relationships between psy chological principles and food preferences.
Posted in Psychology

Consumer Culture

Author: Heidi Watkins

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN: 0737752068

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 104

View: 7547

Editor Heidi Watkins has compiled several essays that will help your readers understand what consumer culture is, and the role that they play in it. The essays present diversity of opinion on this topic, including both conservative and liberal points of view in an even balance. Readers will hear from Madeline Levine on how consumer culture harms children and teens while Howard Bloom argues that it benefits society. Jean Kilbourne reports that advertising is to blame for overconsumption while John Naish argues that human instinct it to blame for it. Closing essays help readers understand what they should know and do about consumer culture.
Posted in Young Adult Nonfiction

The End of Overeating

Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite

Author: David A. Kessler

Publisher: Rodale Books

ISBN: 1605295051

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 666

Dr. David A. Kessler, the dynamic and controversial former FDA commissioner known for his crusade against the tobacco industry, is taking on another business that's making Americans sick: the food industry. In The End of Overeating, Dr. Kessler shows us how our brain chemistry has been hijacked by the foods we most love to eat: those that contain stimulating combinations of fat, sugar, and salt. Drawn from the latest brain science as well as interviews with top physicians and food industry insiders, The End of Overeating exposes the food industry's aggressive marketing tactics and reveals shocking facts about how we lost control over food—and what we can do to get it back. For the millions of people struggling with their weight as well as those of us who simply can't seem to eat our favorite foods in moderation, Dr. Kessler's cutting-edge investigation offers valuable insights and practical answers for America's largest-ever public health crisis. There has never been a more thorough, compelling, or in-depth analysis of why we eat the way we do.
Posted in Social Science

The Hacking of the American Mind

The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains

Author: Robert H. Lustig

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101982594

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 7343

"Explores how industry has manipulated our most deep-seated survival instincts."—David Perlmutter, MD, Author, #1 New York Times bestseller, Grain Brain and Brain Maker The New York Times–bestselling author of Fat Chance reveals the corporate scheme to sell pleasure, driving the international epidemic of addiction, depression, and chronic disease. While researching the toxic and addictive properties of sugar for his New York Times bestseller Fat Chance, Robert Lustig made an alarming discovery—our pursuit of happiness is being subverted by a culture of addiction and depression from which we may never recover. Dopamine is the “reward” neurotransmitter that tells our brains we want more; yet every substance or behavior that releases dopamine in the extreme leads to addiction. Serotonin is the “contentment” neurotransmitter that tells our brains we don’t need any more; yet its deficiency leads to depression. Ideally, both are in optimal supply. Yet dopamine evolved to overwhelm serotonin—because our ancestors were more likely to survive if they were constantly motivated—with the result that constant desire can chemically destroy our ability to feel happiness, while sending us down the slippery slope to addiction. In the last forty years, government legislation and subsidies have promoted ever-available temptation (sugar, drugs, social media, porn) combined with constant stress (work, home, money, Internet), with the end result of an unprecedented epidemic of addiction, anxiety, depression, and chronic disease. And with the advent of neuromarketing, corporate America has successfully imprisoned us in an endless loop of desire and consumption from which there is no obvious escape. With his customary wit and incisiveness, Lustig not only reveals the science that drives these states of mind, he points his finger directly at the corporations that helped create this mess, and the government actors who facilitated it, and he offers solutions we can all use in the pursuit of happiness, even in the face of overwhelming opposition. Always fearless and provocative, Lustig marshals a call to action, with seminal implications for our health, our well-being, and our culture.
Posted in Science