The Poverty Industry

The Exploitation of America's Most Vulnerable Citizens

Author: Daniel L. Hatcher

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479863114

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 4359

Government aid doesn’t always go where it’s supposed to. Foster care agencies team up with companies to take disability and survivor benefits from abused and neglected children. States and their revenue consultants use illusory schemes to siphon Medicaid funds intended for children and the poor into general state coffers. Child support payments for foster children and families on public assistance are converted into government revenue. And the poverty industry keeps expanding, leaving us with nursing homes and juvenile detention centers that sedate residents to reduce costs and maximize profit, local governments buying nursing homes to take the facilities’ federal aid while the elderly languish with poor care, and counties hiring companies to mine the poor for additional funds in modern day debtor’s prisons. In The Poverty Industry, Daniel L. Hatcher shows us how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social safety net, turning America’s most vulnerable populations into sources of revenue. The poverty industry is stealing billions in federal aid and other funds from impoverished families, abused and neglected children, and the disabled and elderly poor. As policy experts across the political spectrum debate how to best structure government assistance programs, a massive siphoning of the safety net is occurring behind the scenes.In the face of these abuses of power, Hatcher offers a road map for reforms to realign the practices of human service agencies with their intended purpose, to prevent the misuse of public taxpayer dollars, and to ensure that government aid truly gets to those in need.
Posted in Political Science

Ending Zero Tolerance

The Crisis of Absolute School Discipline

Author: Derek W. Black

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 147988233X

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 2699

Ending Zero Tolerance answers the calls of grassroots communities pressing for integration and increased education funding with a complete rethinking of school discipline. In the era of zero tolerance, we are flooded with stories about schools issuing draconian punishments for relatively innocent behavior. One student was suspended for chewing a Pop-Tart into the shape of a gun. Another was expelled for cursing on social media from home. Suspension and expulsion rates have doubled over the past three decades as zero tolerance policies have become the normal response to a host of minor infractions that extend well beyond just drugs and weapons. Students from all demographic groups have suffered, but minority and special needs students have suffered the most. On average, middle and high schools suspend one out of four African American students at least once a year. The effects of these policies are devastating. Just one suspension in the ninth grade doubles the likelihood that a student will drop out. Fifty percent of students who drop out are subsequently unemployed. Eighty percent of prisoners are high school drop outs. The risks associated with suspension and expulsion are so high that, as a practical matter, they amount to educational death penalties, not behavioral correction tools. Most important, punitive discipline policies undermine the quality of education that innocent bystanders receive as well—the exact opposite of what schools intend. Derek Black, a former attorney with the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, weaves stories about individual students, lessons from social science, and the outcomes of courts cases to unearth a shockingly irrational system of punishment. While schools and legislatures have proven unable and unwilling to amend their failing policies, Ending Zero Tolerance argues for constitutional protections to check abuses in school discipline and lays out theories by which courts should re-engage to enforce students’ rights and support broader reforms.
Posted in Law

Family Properties

Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America

Author: Beryl Satter

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 9781429952606

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 413

Part family story and part urban history, a landmark investigation of segregation and urban decay in Chicago -- and cities across the nation The "promised land" for thousands of Southern blacks, postwar Chicago quickly became the most segregated city in the North, the site of the nation's worst ghettos and the target of Martin Luther King Jr.'s first campaign beyond the South. In this powerful book, Beryl Satter identifies the true causes of the city's black slums and the ruin of urban neighborhoods throughout the country: not, as some have argued, black pathology, the culture of poverty, or white flight, but a widespread and institutionalized system of legal and financial exploitation. In Satter's riveting account of a city in crisis, unscrupulous lawyers, slumlords, and speculators are pitched against religious reformers, community organizers, and an impassioned attorney who launched a crusade against the profiteers—the author's father, Mark J. Satter. At the heart of the struggle stand the black migrants who, having left the South with its legacy of sharecropping, suddenly find themselves caught in a new kind of debt peonage. Satter shows the interlocking forces at work in their oppression: the discriminatory practices of the banking industry; the federal policies that created the country's shameful "dual housing market"; the economic anxieties that fueled white violence; and the tempting profits to be made by preying on the city's most vulnerable population. Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America is a monumental work of history, this tale of racism and real estate, politics and finance, will forever change our understanding of the forces that transformed urban America. "Gripping . . . This painstaking portrayal of the human costs of financial racism is the most important book yet written on the black freedom struggle in the urban North."—David Garrow, The Washington Post
Posted in History

International Development

Ideas, Experience, and Prospects

Author: Bruce Currie-Alder,Ravi Kanbur,David M. Malone,Rohinton Medhora

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191651699

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 896

View: 7777

Thinking on development informs and inspires the actions of people, organizations, and states in their continuous effort to invent a better world. This volume examines the ideas behind development: their origins, how they have changed and spread over time, and how they may evolve over the coming decades. It also examines how the real-life experiences of different countries and organizations have been inspired by, and contributed to, thinking on development. The extent to which development 'works' depends in part on particular local, historical, or institutional contexts. General policy prescriptions fail when the necessary conditions that make them work are either absent, ignored, or poorly understood. There is a need to grasp how people understand their own development experience. If the countries of the world are varied in every way, from their initial conditions to the degree of their openness to outside money and influence, and success is not centred in any one group, it stands to reason that there cannot be a single recipe for development. Each chapter provides an analytical survey of thinking about development that highlights debates and takes into account critical perspectives. It includes contributions from scholars and practitioners from the global North and the global South, spanning at least two generations and multiple disciplines. It will be a key reference on the concepts and theories of development - their origins, evolution, and trajectories - and act as a resource for scholars, graduate students, and practitioners.
Posted in Business & Economics

$2.00 a Day

Living on Almost Nothing in America

Author: Kathryn J. Edin,H. Luke Shaefer

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544303180

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 4589

Thestory ofa kind of poverty in America so deep that we, as a country, don't even think exists from a leading national poverty expert who defies convention ("New York Times")"
Posted in Social Science

Asian American Women

Issues, Concerns, and Responsive Human and Civil Rights Advocacy

Author: Lora Jo Foo

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 0595301819

Category: Law

Page: 195

View: 3523

Asian American Women: Issues, Concerns, and Responsive Human and Civil Rights Advocacy reveals the struggles of Asian American women at the bottom of the socio-economic ladder where hunger, illness, homelessness, sweatshop labor, exposure to hazardous chemicals and even involuntary servitude are everyday realities. Asian American women of all socio-economic classes suffer from domestic violence whose root causes stem from the particular forms of patriarchy that exist in Asian cultures. Their health and lives are endangered due to prevalent but wrong stereotypes about Asian women. The model minority myth hides the appalling level of human and civil rights violations against Asian American women. The lack of research or the lumping together of the over 24 subgroups of Asian Americans into a homogeneous whole misleads the public as to the extent of injustices inflicted on Asian American women. The book captures their suffering and also the fighting spirit of Asian American women who have waged social and economic justice campaigns and founded organizations to right the wrongs against them. The book is a call to action to Asian Americans, policy makers, civil rights organizations and the philanthropic community to support Asian American women in their struggles to advance their social justice agenda.
Posted in Law

Evicted

Poverty and Profit in the American City

Author: Matthew Desmond

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0553447432

Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE

Page: 418

View: 2018

A Harvard sociologist examines the challenge of eviction as a formidable cause of poverty in America, revealing how millions of people are wrongly forced from their homes and reduced to cycles of extreme disadvantage that are reinforced by dysfunctional legal systems. Set in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Posted in POLITICAL SCIENCE

Washington Letter

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Bar associations

Page: N.A

View: 3898

Posted in Bar associations

The Working Poor

Invisible in America

Author: David K. Shipler

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307493408

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 886

From the author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning Arab and Jew, an intimate portrait unfolds of working American families struggling against insurmountable odds to escape poverty. As David K. Shipler makes clear in this powerful, humane study, the invisible poor are engaged in the activity most respected in American ideology—hard, honest work. But their version of the American Dream is a nightmare: low-paying, dead-end jobs; the profound failure of government to improve upon decaying housing, health care, and education; the failure of families to break the patterns of child abuse and substance abuse. Shipler exposes the interlocking problems by taking us into the sorrowful, infuriating, courageous lives of the poor—white and black, Asian and Latino, citizens and immigrants. We encounter them every day, for they do jobs essential to the American economy. This impassioned book not only dissects the problems, but makes pointed, informed recommendations for change. It is a book that stands to make a difference.
Posted in Social Science

The Law

Author: Frederic Bastiat

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1596059648

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 68

View: 4407

French political libertarian and economist CLAUDE FRDRIC BASTIAT (1801-1850) was one of the most eloquent champions of the concept that property rights and individual freedoms flowed from natural law. Here, in this 1850 classic, a powerful refutation of Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, published two years earlier, Bastiat discusses: . what is law? . why socialism constitutes legal plunder . the proper function of the law . the law and morality . "the vicious circle of socialism" . the basis for stable government . and more.
Posted in Business & Economics

From Poverty to Power

How Active Citizens and Effective States Can Change the World

Author: Duncan Green

Publisher: Oxfam

ISBN: 0855985933

Category: Social Science

Page: 522

View: 4253

Offers a look at the causes and effects of poverty and inequality, as well as the possible solutions. This title features research, human stories, statistics, and compelling arguments. It discusses about the world we live in and how we can make it a better place.
Posted in Social Science

Families

A Social Class Perspective

Author: Shirley A. Hill

Publisher: Pine Forge Press

ISBN: 1412998018

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 149

View: 5213

This book focuses on the impact of economic systems and social class on the organization of family life. Since the most vital function of the family is the survival of its members, the author give primacy to the economic system in structuring the broad parameters of family life. She explains how the economy shapes the prospects families have for earning a decent living by determining the location, nature, and pay associated with work.
Posted in Family & Relationships

Creating an Opportunity Society

Author: Ron Haskins,Isabel V. Sawhill

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 9780815703938

Category: Social Science

Page: 347

View: 1980

Americans believe economic opportunity is as fundamental a right as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. More concerned about a level playing field for all, they worry less about the growing income and wealth disparity in our country. Creating an Opportunity Society examines economic opportunity in the United States and explores how to create more of it, particularly for those on the bottom rungs of the economic ladder. Ron Haskins and Isabel Sawhill propose a concrete agenda for increasing opportunity that is cost effective, consistent with American values, and focuses on improving the lives of the young and the disadvantaged. They emphasize individual responsibility as an indispensable basis for successful policies and programs. The authors recommend a three-pronged approach to create more opportunity in America: • Increase education for children and youth at the preschool, K–12, and postsecondary levels • Encourage and support work among adults • Reduce the number of out-of-wedlock births while increasing the share of children reared by their married parents With concern for the federal deficit in mind, Haskins and Sawhill argue for reallocating existing resources, especially from the affluent elderly to disadvantaged children and their families. The authors are optimistic that a judicious use of the nation's resources can level the playing field and produce more opportunity for all. Creating an Opportunity Society offers the most complete summary available of the facts and the factors that contribute to economic opportunity. It looks at the poor, the middle class, and the rich, providing deep background data on how each group has fared in recent decades. Unfortunately, only the rich have made substantial progress, making this book a timely guide forward for anyone interested in what we can do as a society to improve the prospects for our less-advantaged families and fellow citizens.
Posted in Social Science

The Other America

Author: Michael Harrington

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 068482678X

Category: Political Science

Page: 231

View: 8066

Presents the original report on poverty in America that led President Kennedy to initiate the federal poverty program
Posted in Political Science

Congressional Record

Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress

Author: United States. Congress

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 5992

Posted in Law

The Chicago Reporter

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: N.A

View: 6078

Posted in African Americans

The Case Against Immigration

The Moral, Economic, Social, and Environmental Reasons for Reducing U.S. Immigration Back to Traditional Levels

Author: Roy Howard Beck

Publisher: Roy Beck

ISBN: 0393039153

Category: Social Science

Page: 287

View: 4719

Argues current immigration levels hurt individuals to communities
Posted in Social Science

El desarrollo sostenible, una guía sobre nuestro futuro común

El informe de la Comisión Mundial sobre el Medio Ambiente y el Desarrollo

Author: World Commission on Environment and Development

Publisher: IICA Biblioteca Venezuela

ISBN: 9780192820808

Category: Nature

Page: 383

View: 2558

Discusses population growth, food production, energy, industry, and urban development, and suggests ways to promote economic growth while protecting the environment.
Posted in Nature

The Integration of Immigrants into American Society

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,Committee on Population,Panel on the Integration of Immigrants into American Society

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309373980

Category: Social Science

Page: 458

View: 8190

The United States prides itself on being a nation of immigrants, and the country has a long history of successfully absorbing people from across the globe. The integration of immigrants and their children contributes to our economic vitality and our vibrant and ever changing culture. We have offered opportunities to immigrants and their children to better themselves and to be fully incorporated into our society and in exchange immigrants have become Americans - embracing an American identity and citizenship, protecting our country through service in our military, fostering technological innovation, harvesting its crops, and enriching everything from the nation's cuisine to its universities, music, and art. Today, the 41 million immigrants in the United States represent 13.1 percent of the U.S. population. The U.S.-born children of immigrants, the second generation, represent another 37.1 million people, or 12 percent of the population. Thus, together the first and second generations account for one out of four members of the U.S. population. Whether they are successfully integrating is therefore a pressing and important question. Are new immigrants and their children being well integrated into American society, within and across generations? Do current policies and practices facilitate their integration? How is American society being transformed by the millions of immigrants who have arrived in recent decades? To answer these questions, this new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine summarizes what we know about how immigrants and their descendants are integrating into American society in a range of areas such as education, occupations, health, and language.
Posted in Social Science