Colonial origins of the American Constitution

a documentary history

Author: Donald S. Lutz

Publisher: Liberty Fund Inc.

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 3842

This landmark collection of eighty documents created by the American colonists--and not English officials--is the genesis of American fundamental law and constitutionalism. Included are all documents attempting to unite the colonies, beginning with the New England Confederation of 1643.
Posted in History

The Origins of the American Constitution

a documentary history

Author: Michael G. Kammen

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN: 9780140087444

Category: History

Page: 407

View: 356

Describes the evolution of the American Constitution by analyzing material from state constitutions, the Articles of Confederation, the Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers, and the personal correspondence of Convention delegates
Posted in History

The Origin and Growth of the American Constitution

An Historical Treatise in which the Documentary Evidence as to the Making of the Entirely New Plan of Federal Government Embodied in the Existing Constitution of the United States Is, for the First Time, Set Forth as a Complete and Consistent Whole

Author: Hannis Taylor

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Constitutional history

Page: 676

View: 1961

Posted in Constitutional history

A Machine that Would Go of Itself

The Constitution in American Culture

Author: Michael G. Kammen

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN: 9780312091279

Category: History

Page: 550

View: 5375

Posted in History

The Bill of Rights and the States

The Colonial and Revolutionary Origins of American Liberties

Author: Patrick T. Conley,U.S. Constitution Council of the Thirteen Original States

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780945612292

Category: History

Page: 542

View: 3583

Fourteen individual state essays elucidate the complexitites of local and regional interests that shaped the debate over individual rights and the eventual adoption of the Bill of Rights.
Posted in History

The origin of the Second Amendment

a documentary history of the Bill of Rights in commentaries on liberty, free government and an armed populace, 1787-1792

Author: David E. Young

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 838

View: 8846

Posted in Law

A Brilliant Solution

Inventing the American Constitution

Author: Carol Berkin

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547537818

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6026

We know--and love--the story of the American Revolution, from the Declaration of Independence to Cornwallis's defeat. But our first government was a disaster and the country was in a terrible crisis. So when a group of men traveled to Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 to save a nation in danger of collapse, they had no great expectations for the meeting that would make history. But all the ideas, arguments, and compromises led to a great thing: a constitution and a government were born that have surpassed the founders' greatest hopes. Revisiting all the original documents and using her deep knowledge of eighteenth-century history and politics, Carol Berkin takes a fresh look at the men who framed the Constitution, the issues they faced, and the times they lived in. Berkin transports the reader into the hearts and minds of the founders, exposing their fears and their limited expectations of success.
Posted in History

Constitutional Debates on Freedom of Religion

A Documentary History

Author: John J. Patrick,Gerald P. Long

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313301407

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 509

Traces the history and development of the debate over the separation of religion and government in the United States through a collection of primary documents.
Posted in History

A Leap in the Dark

The Struggle to Create the American Republic

Author: John Ferling

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199728701

Category: Political Science

Page: 576

View: 6021

It was an age of fascinating leaders and difficult choices, of grand ideas eloquently expressed and of epic conflicts bitterly fought. Now comes a brilliant portrait of the American Revolution, one that is compelling in its prose, fascinating in its details, and provocative in its fresh interpretations. In A Leap in the Dark, John Ferling offers a magisterial new history that surges from the first rumblings of colonial protest to the volcanic election of 1800. Ferling's swift-moving narrative teems with fascinating details. We see Benjamin Franklin trying to decide if his loyalty was to Great Britain or to America, and we meet George Washington when he was a shrewd planter-businessman who discovered personal economic advantages to American independence. We encounter those who supported the war against Great Britain in 1776, but opposed independence because it was a "leap in the dark." Following the war, we hear talk in the North of secession from the United States. The author offers a gripping account of the most dramatic events of our history, showing just how closely fought were the struggle for independence, the adoption of the Constitution, and the later battle between Federalists and Democratic-Republicans. Yet, without slowing the flow of events, he has also produced a landmark study of leadership and ideas. Here is all the erratic brilliance of Hamilton and Jefferson battling to shape the new nation, and here too is the passion and political shrewdness of revolutionaries, such as Samuel Adams and Patrick Henry, and their Loyalist counterparts, Joseph Galloway and Thomas Hutchinson. Here as well are activists who are not so well known today, men like Abraham Yates, who battled for democratic change, and Theodore Sedgwick, who fought to preserve the political and social system of the colonial past. Ferling shows that throughout this period the epic political battles often resembled today's politics and the politicians--the founders--played a political hardball attendant with enmities, selfish motivations, and bitterness. The political stakes, this book demonstrates, were extraordinary: first to secure independence, then to determine the meaning of the American Revolution. John Ferling has shown himself to be an insightful historian of our Revolution, and an unusually skillful writer. A Leap in the Dark is his masterpiece, work that provokes, enlightens, and entertains in full measure.
Posted in Political Science

The Origins of the Necessary and Proper Clause

Author: Gary Lawson,Geoffrey P. Miller,Robert G. Natelson,Guy I. Seidman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139489844

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 3784

The Necessary and Proper Clause is one of the most important parts of the US Constitution. Today this short thirty-nine-word paragraph is cited as the legal foundation for much of the modern federal government. Through three independent lines of research, the authors trace the lineage of the Necessary and Proper Clause to the everyday law of the Founding Era - the same law that American founders such as Madison, Hamilton, and Washington applied in their daily lives. Origins of the Necessary and Proper Clause are found in law-governing agencies, public administration, and corporations. Moreover, all of those areas were undergirded by common principles of fiduciary responsibility - reflecting the Founders' view that a public office is truly a public trust. This explains the choice of language in the clause and provides clues about its meaning. This book thus serves as a reference source for scholars seeking to understand the intellectual foundations of one of the Constitution's most important clauses.
Posted in Law

A Documentary History of the United States (Revised and Updated)

Author: Alexander Heffner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0451490029

Category: Literary Collections

Page: N.A

View: 8200

Here, in a single volume, are the documents, speeches, and letters that have forged American history, now updated with new content such as Trump's inaugural address. Accompanied by interpretations of their significance by noted historian Richard D. Heffner and journalist Alexander Heffner, this book includes important documents such as: * The complete text of the Declaration of Independence * The complete Constitution of the United States * The Monroe Doctrine * The Emancipation Proclamation * Woodrow Wilson's War Message to Congress * Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" Speech * John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address * Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" Speech * Ronald Reagan's Inaugural Addresses * Documents relating to September 11, 2001 and the Iraq War This edition has been expanded and updated to include a chapter on the Presidency of Donald Trump.
Posted in Literary Collections

The Framers' Coup

The Making of the United States Constitution

Author: Michael J. Klarman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190612215

Category: History

Page: 865

View: 2802

Americans revere their Constitution. However, most of us are unaware how tumultuous and improbable the drafting and ratification processes were. As Benjamin Franklin keenly observed, any assembly of men bring with them "all their prejudices, their passions, their errors of opinion, their local interests and their selfish views." One need not deny that the Framers had good intentions in order to believe that they also had interests. Based on prodigious research and told largely through the voices of the participants, Michael Klarman's The Framers' Coup narrates how the Framers' clashing interests shaped the Constitution--and American history itself. The Philadelphia convention could easily have been a failure, and the risk of collapse was always present. Had the convention dissolved, any number of adverse outcomes could have resulted, including civil war or a reversion to monarchy. Not only does Klarman capture the knife's-edge atmosphere of the convention, he populates his narrative with riveting and colorful stories: the rebellion of debtor farmers in Massachusetts; George Washington's uncertainty about whether to attend; Gunning Bedford's threat to turn to a European prince if the small states were denied equal representation in the Senate; slave staters' threats to take their marbles and go home if denied representation for their slaves; Hamilton's quasi-monarchist speech to the convention; and Patrick Henry's herculean efforts to defeat the Constitution in Virginia through demagoguery and conspiracy theories. The Framers' Coup is more than a compendium of great stories, however, and the powerful arguments that feature throughout will reshape our understanding of the nation's founding. Simply put, the Constitutional Convention almost didn't happen, and once it happened, it almost failed. And, even after the convention succeeded, the Constitution it produced almost failed to be ratified. Just as importantly, the Constitution was hardly the product of philosophical reflections by brilliant, disinterested statesmen, but rather ordinary interest group politics. Multiple conflicting interests had a say, from creditors and debtors to city dwellers and backwoodsmen. The upper class overwhelmingly supported the Constitution; many working class colonists were more dubious. Slave states and nonslave states had different perspectives on how well the Constitution served their interests. Ultimately, both the Constitution's content and its ratification process raise troubling questions about democratic legitimacy. The Federalists were eager to avoid full-fledged democratic deliberation over the Constitution, and the document that was ratified was stacked in favor of their preferences. And in terms of substance, the Constitution was a significant departure from the more democratic state constitutions of the 1770s. Definitive and authoritative, The Framers' Coup explains why the Framers preferred such a constitution and how they managed to persuade the country to adopt it. We have lived with the consequences, both positive and negative, ever since.
Posted in History

The Constitutional Origins of the American Revolution

Author: Jack P. Greene

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139492934

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2741

Using the British Empire as a case study, this succinct study argues that the establishment of overseas settlements in America created a problem of constitutional organization. The failure to resolve the resulting tensions led to the thirteen continental colonies seceding from the empire in 1776. Challenging those historians who have assumed that the British had the law on their side during the debates that led to the American Revolution, this volume argues that the empire had long exhibited a high degree of constitutional multiplicity, with each colony having its own discrete constitution. Contending that these constitutions cannot be conflated with the metropolitan British constitution, it argues that British refusal to accept the legitimacy of colonial understandings of the sanctity of the many colonial constitutions and the imperial constitution was the critical element leading to the American Revolution.
Posted in History

A People's History of the United States

1492-Present

Author: Howard Zinn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325303

Category: History

Page: 744

View: 8416

This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.
Posted in History

A Revolution in Favor of Government

Origins of the U.S. Constitution and the Making of the American State

Author: Max M. Edling

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199705856

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 9194

What were the intentions of the Founders? Was the American constitution designed to protect individual rights? To limit the powers of government? To curb the excesses of democracy? Or to create a robust democratic nation-state? These questions echo through today's most heated legal and political debates. In this powerful new interpretation of America's origins, Max Edling argues that the Federalists were primarily concerned with building a government that could act vigorously in defense of American interests. The Constitution transferred the powers of war making and resource extraction from the states to the national government thereby creating a nation-state invested with all the important powers of Europe's eighteenth-century "fiscal-military states." A strong centralized government, however, challenged the American people's deeply ingrained distrust of unduly concentrated authority. To secure the Constitution's adoption the Federalists had to accommodate the formation of a powerful national government to the strong current of anti-statism in the American political tradition. They did so by designing a government that would be powerful in times of crisis, but which would make only limited demands on the citizenry and have a sharply restricted presence in society. The Constitution promised the American people the benefit of government without its costs. Taking advantage of a newly published letterpress edition of the constitutional debates, A Revolution in Favor of Government recovers a neglected strand of the Federalist argument, making a persuasive case for rethinking the formation of the federal American state.
Posted in Political Science

The Constitution

A Documentary and Narrative History

Author: Page Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Constitutional history

Page: 564

View: 8506

Examines the origins and growth of the Constitution and discusses its functions in American life.
Posted in Constitutional history

The Constitution Before the Judgment Seat

The Prehistory and Ratification of the American Constitution, 1787-1791

Author: Jürgen Heideking,John P. Kaminski,Richard Leffler

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813931746

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 7279

First translation by Jerry Neeb-Crippen made from a text with "substantial deletions" by the author. Richard Leffler and the author revised the first three chapters of the translation; then Leffler and Kaminski finished the editing. (p. ix)
Posted in History

The Origins of American Constitutionalism

Author: Donald S. Lutz

Publisher: Lsu Press

ISBN: 9780807115060

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 8716

In The Origins of American Constitutionalism, Donald S. Lutz challenges the prevailing notion that the United States Constitution was either essentially inherited from the British or simply invented by the Federalists in the summer of 1787. His political theory of constitutionalism acknowledges the contributions of the British and the Federalists. Lutz also asserts, however, that the U.S. Constitution derives in form and content from a tradition of American colonial characters and documents of political foundation that began a century and a half prior to 1787. Lutz builds his argument around a close textual analysis of such documents as the Mayflower Compact, the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, the Rode Island Charter of 1663, the first state constitutions, the Declaration of Independence, and the Articles of Confederation. He shows that American Constitutionalism developed to a considerable degree from radical Protestant interpretations of the Judeo-Christian tradition that were first secularized into political compacts and then incorporated into constitutions and bills of rights. Over time, appropriations that enriched this tradition included aspects of English common law and English Whig theory. Lutz also looks at the influence of Montesquieu, Locke, Blackstone, and Hume. In addition, he details the importance of Americans' experiences and history to the political theory that produced the Constitution. By placing the Constitution within this broader constitutional system, Lutz demonstrates that the document is the culmination of a long process and must be understood within this context. His argument also offers a fresh view of current controversies over the Framers' intentions, the place of religion in American politics, and citizens' continuing role in the development of the constitutional tradition.
Posted in History

American Archives

Consisting of a Collection of Authentick Records, State Papers, Debates, and Letters and Other Notices of Publick Affairs, the Whole Forming a Documentary History of the Origin and Progress of the North American Colonies; of the Causes and Accomplishment of the American Revolution; and of the Constitution of Government for the United States, to the Final Ratification Thereof. In Six Series ...

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 9141

Posted in United States

The Revolutionary Constitution

Author: David J. Bodenhamer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019991303X

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 1572

The framers of the Constitution chose their words carefully when they wrote of a more perfect union--not absolutely perfect, but with room for improvement. Indeed, we no longer operate under the same Constitution as that ratified in 1788, or even the one completed by the Bill of Rights in 1791--because we are no longer the same nation. In The Revolutionary Constitution, David J. Bodenhamer provides a comprehensive new look at America's basic law, integrating the latest legal scholarship with historical context to highlight how it has evolved over time. The Constitution, he notes, was the product of the first modern revolution, and revolutions are, by definition, moments when the past shifts toward an unfamiliar future, one radically different from what was foreseen only a brief time earlier. In seeking to balance power and liberty, the framers established a structure that would allow future generations to continually readjust the scale. Bodenhamer explores this dynamic through seven major constitutional themes: federalism, balance of powers, property, representation, equality, rights, and security. With each, he takes a historical approach, following their changes over time. For example, the framers wrote multiple protections for property rights into the Constitution in response to actions by state governments after the Revolution. But twentieth-century courts--and Congress--redefined property rights through measures such as zoning and the designation of historical landmarks (diminishing their commercial value) in response to the needs of a modern economy. The framers anticipated just such a future reworking of their own compromises between liberty and power. With up-to-the-minute legal expertise and a broad grasp of the social and political context, this book is a tour de force of Constitutional history and analysis.
Posted in History