The Mercury 13

The True Story of Thirteen Women and the Dream of Space Flight

Author: Martha Ackmann

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0375758933

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 4606

Profiles the thirteen extraordinary women, all pilots who passed the same battery of tests as the Mercury 7 astronauts, who were chosen as America's first female astronauts but who were refused the opportunity to participate, in a fascinating study that includes interviews with the surviving candidates, space program insiders, and other notables. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.
Posted in History

Almost Astronauts

13 Women Who Dared to Dream

Author: Tanya Lee Stone

Publisher: Candlewick Press

ISBN: 0763656097

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 144

View: 9384

What does it take to be an astronaut? Excellence at flying, courage, intelligence, resistance to stress, top physical shape — any checklist would include these. But when America created NASA in 1958, there was another unspoken rule: you had to be a man. Here is the tale of thirteen women who proved that they were not only as tough as the toughest man but also brave enough to challenge the government. They were blocked by prejudice, jealousy, and the scrawled note of one of the most powerful men in Washington. But even though the Mercury 13 women did not make it into space, they did not lose, for their example empowered young women to take their place in the sky, piloting jets and commanding space capsules. ALMOST ASTRONAUTS is the story of thirteen true pioneers of the space age.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

Curveball

The Remarkable Story of Toni Stone the First Woman to Play Professional Baseball in the Negro League

Author: Martha Ackmann

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1569766843

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 7395

Documenting multiple challenges at every turn--as a target for racism from society at large and sexism both inside and outside of the Negro League--this is the unique story of the first woman to play professional baseball on a men's team, breaking barriers in sports while believing, "There's got to be a first in everything. Maybe it will be me." Highlighting aggressive and resourceful behaviors, the text explains that as players began to leave the Negro League for major league teams, Toni Stone seized her only opportunity to play professional ball and replaced Henry Aaron on the Indianapolis Clowns, the Negro League's top team. Chronicling her career, this biography follows her experiences playing first with the Indianapolis Clowns, and later with the Kansas City Monarchs. It also details her encounters with the era's top athletes--Ernie Banks, Willie Mays, Buck O'Neil, and Satchel Paige to name a few. As the exploration reveals her remarkable talent, perseverance, and accomplishments, it shows how she posed as a double threat--black and female--to the dominance of white males in sports and society.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Women in Space

23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures

Author: Karen Gibson

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613748477

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 240

View: 3831

When Valentina Tereshkova blasted off aboard Vostok 6 on June 16, 1963, she became the first woman to rocket into space. It would be 19 years before another woman got a chance—cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya in 1982—followed by American astronaut Sally Ride a year later. And by breaking the stratospheric ceiling, these women forged a path for many female astronauts, cosmonauts, and mission specialists to follow. In Women in Space, author Karen Bush Gibson profiles 23 pioneers, all of whom achieved greatness in orbit. Read about Eileen Collins, the first woman to command the Space Shuttle; Peggy Whitson, who has logged more than a year in orbit aboard the International Space Station; Mae Jemison, the first African American woman in space; as well as astronauts from Japan, Canada, Italy, South Korea, France, and more. Learn, too, about the Mercury 13, American women selected by NASA in the late 1950s to train for spaceflight. Though they matched and sometimes surpassed their male counterparts in performance, they were ultimately denied the opportunity to head out to the launching pad. Their story, and the stories of pilots, physicists, and doctors who followed them, demonstrate the vital role women have played in the quest for scientific understanding. Karen Bush Gibson is the author of Women Aviators, Native American History for Kids, and three dozen other books for young readers. She lives in Norman, Oklahoma.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

The Real Space Cowboys

Author: Ed Buckbee,Wally Schirra

Publisher: Collectors Guide Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 168

View: 2808

Presents a history of American manned space flight, focusing on the Mercury and Apollo astronauts, describing their training and voyages into space.
Posted in Science

Rise of the Rocket Girls

The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars

Author: Nathalia Holt

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316338915

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 6106

"If Hidden Figures has you itching to learn more about the women who worked in the space program, pick up Nathalia Holt's lively, immensely readable history, Rise of the Rocket Girls." --Entertainment Weekly The riveting true story of the women who launched America into space. In the 1940s and 50s, when the newly minted Jet Propulsion Laboratory needed quick-thinking mathematicians to calculate velocities and plot trajectories, they didn't turn to male graduates. Rather, they recruited an elite group of young women who, with only pencil, paper, and mathematical prowess, transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible. For the first time, Rise of the Rocket Girls tells the stories of these women--known as "human computers"--who broke the boundaries of both gender and science. Based on extensive research and interviews with all the living members of the team, Rise of the Rocket Girls offers a unique perspective on the role of women in science: both where we've been, and the far reaches of space to which we're heading.
Posted in History

Into That Silent Sea

Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965

Author: Francis French,Colin Burgess

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803226395

Category: Science

Page: 407

View: 6364

A history of early space flight focuses on the careers of both American astronauts and Soviet cosmonauts and includes coverage of other persons who worked in support roles.
Posted in Science

The Astronaut Wives Club

Author: Lily Koppel

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 1455503231

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9129

Read the bestselling book that inspired the ABC television series. As America's Mercury Seven astronauts were launched on death-defying missions, television cameras focused on the brave smiles of their young wives. Overnight, these women were transformed from military spouses into American royalty. They had tea with Jackie Kennedy, appeared on the cover of Life magazine, and quickly grew into fashion icons. Annie Glenn, with her picture-perfect marriage, was the envy of the other wives; JFK made it clear that platinum-blonde Rene Carpenter was his favorite; and licensed pilot Trudy Cooper arrived with a secret that needed to stay hidden from NASA. Together with the other wives they formed the Astronaut Wives Club, providing one another with support and friendship, coffee and cocktails. As their celebrity rose-and as divorce and tragedy began to touch their lives-the wives continued to rally together, forming bonds that would withstand the test of time, and they have stayed friends for over half a century. THE ASTRONAUT WIVES CLUB tells the story of the women who stood beside some of the biggest heroes in American history.
Posted in History

Right Stuff, Wrong Sex

America's First Women in Space Program

Author: Margaret A. Weitekamp

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801883941

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 7760

Margaret Weitekamp traces the rise and fall of the Lovelace Woman in Space program within the context of the cold war and the thriving women's aviation culture of the 1950s, showing how the Lovelace trainees challenged prevailing attitudes about women's roles and capabilities. In examining the experiences of the would-be Lady Astronauts, this study documents the achievements and frustrated hopes of a remarkable group of women.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Promised the Moon

The Untold Story of the First Women in the Space Race

Author: Stephanie Nolen

Publisher: Thunder's Mouth Press

ISBN: 9781568583198

Category: Science

Page: 356

View: 1902

A female world-record-setting pilot, Jerrie Cobb was recruited in 1959 to take the astronaut tests. She excelled, so the doctor who supervised the selection of NASA's Mercury astronauts recruited additional female pilots. Twelve performed exceptionally. Stephanie Nolen tracked down eleven of the surviving "Fellow Lady Astronaut Trainees" and learned the story of those early days of the space race and the disappointment when, in 1961, the women were grounded.
Posted in Science

One Small Step

Author: P.B. Kerr

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416942149

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 320

View: 1022

In 1969 Houston, Texas, thirteen-year-old Scott learns to fly from his father, an Air Force flight instructor, but when NASA needs him for a secret space mission, Scott's elation is tempered by concern that his mother, who has moved to Florida, will find out. Reprint.
Posted in Juvenile Fiction

Tethered Mercury

A Pilot's Memoir : The Right Stuff-- But the Wrong Sex

Author: Bernice Trimble Steadman,Jody Malpass Clark

Publisher: Aviation

ISBN: 9780970901606

Category: Flint (Mich.)

Page: 269

View: 1806

Posted in Flint (Mich.)

Woman Into Space

The Jerrie Cobb Story

Author: Jerrie Cobb,Jane Rieker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781258426958

Category:

Page: 250

View: 6783

Posted in

Go, Flight!

The Unsung Heroes of Mission Control, 1965–1992

Author: Rick Houston,Milt Heflin

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803269374

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 495

The inspiration for the documentary Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo At first glance, it looks like just another auditorium in just another government building. But among the talented men (and later women) who worked in mission control, the room located on the third floor of Building 30—at what is now Johnson Space Center—would become known by many as “the Cathedral.” These members of the space program were the brightest of their generations, making split-second decisions that determined the success or failure of a mission. The flight controllers, each supported by a staff of specialists, were the most visible part of the operation, running the missions, talking to the heavens, troubleshooting issues on board, and, ultimately, attempting to bring everyone safely back home. None of NASA’s storied accomplishments would have been possible without these people. Interviews with dozens of individuals who worked in the historic third-floor mission control room bring the compelling stories to life. Go, Flight! is a real-world reminder of where we have been and where we could go again given the right political and social climate.
Posted in History

The Girls of Atomic City

The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II

Author: Denise Kiernan

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451617542

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9056

THE GIRLS OF ATOMIC C ITY AT THE HEIGHT OF WORLD WAR II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, consuming more electricity than New York City. But to most of the world, the town did not exist. Thousands of civilians—many of them young women from small towns across the South—were recruited to this secret city, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work. Kept very much in the dark, few would ever guess the true nature of the tasks they performed each day in the hulking factories in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains. That is, until the end of the war—when Oak Ridge’s secret was revealed. Drawing on the voices of the women who lived it—women who are now in their eighties and nineties— The Girls of Atomic City rescues a remarkable, forgotten chapter of American history from obscurity. Denise Kiernan captures the spirit of the times through these women: their pluck, their desire to contribute, and their enduring courage. Combining the grand-scale human drama of The Worst Hard Time with the intimate biography and often troubling science of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, The Girls of Atomic City is a lasting and important addition to our country’s history.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

This New Ocean

The Story of the First Space Age

Author: William E. Burrows

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0307765482

Category: Science

Page: 752

View: 4882

It was all part of man's greatest adventure--landing men on the Moon and sending a rover to Mars, finally seeing the edge of the universe and the birth of stars, and launching planetary explorers across the solar system to Neptune and beyond. The ancient dream of breaking gravity's hold and taking to space became a reality only because of the intense cold-war rivalry between the superpowers, with towering geniuses like Wernher von Braun and Sergei Korolyov shelving dreams of space travel and instead developing rockets for ballistic missiles and space spectaculars. Now that Russian archives are open and thousands of formerly top-secret U.S. documents are declassified, an often startling new picture of the space age emerges: the frantic effort by the Soviet Union to beat the United States to the Moon was doomed from the beginning by gross inefficiency and by infighting so treacherous that Winston Churchill likened it to "dogs fighting under a carpet"; there was more than science behind the United States' suggestion that satellites be launched during the International Geophysical Year, and in one crucial respect, Sputnik was a godsend to Washington; the hundred-odd German V-2s that provided the vital start to the U.S. missile and space programs legally belonged to the Soviet Union and were spirited to the United States in a derring-do operation worthy of a spy thriller; despite NASA's claim that it was a civilian agency, it had an intimate relationship with the military at the outset and still does--a distinction the Soviet Union never pretended to make; constant efforts to portray astronauts and cosmonauts as "Boy Scouts" were often contradicted by reality; the Apollo missions to the Moon may have been an unexcelled political triumph and feat of exploration, but they also created a headache for the space agency that lingers to this day. This New Ocean is based on 175 interviews with Russian and American scientists and engineers; on archival documents, including formerly top-secret National Intelligence Estimates and spy satellite pictures; and on nearly three decades of reporting. The impressive result is this fascinating story--the first comprehensive account--of the space age. Here are the strategists and war planners; engineers and scientists; politicians and industrialists; astronauts and cosmonauts; science fiction writers and journalists; and plain, ordinary, unabashed dreamers who wanted to transcend gravity's shackles for the ultimate ride. The story is written from the perspective of a witness who was present at the beginning and who has seen the conclusion of the first space age and the start of the second. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Science

The Right Stuff

Author: Tom Wolfe

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429961325

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 1929

From "America's nerviest journalist" (Newsweek)--a breath-taking epic, a magnificent adventure story, and an investigation into the true heroism and courage of the first Americans to conquer space. "Tom Wolfe at his very best" (The New York Times Book Review) Millions of words have poured forth about man's trip to the moon, but until now few people have had a sense of the most engrossing side of the adventure; namely, what went on in the minds of the astronauts themselves - in space, on the moon, and even during certain odysseys on earth. It is this, the inner life of the astronauts, that Tom Wolfe describes with his almost uncanny empathetic powers, that made The Right Stuff a classic.
Posted in History

NASA & the Exploration of Space

With Works from the NASA Art Collection

Author: Roger D. Launius

Publisher: Stewart Tabori & Chang

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 8590

Chronicles the history of the U.S. space program
Posted in Art

Hidden Figures

Author: Margot Lee Shetterly

Publisher: William Collins

ISBN: 9780008201289

Category:

Page: 368

View: 1930

SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE Set amid the civil rights movement, the never-before-told true story of NASAâe(tm)s African-American female mathematicians who played a crucial role in Americaâe(tm)s space program. Before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as âe~Human Computersâe(tm), calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievements. Among these were a coterie of bright, talented African-American women. Segregated from their white counterparts, these âe~colored computersâe(tm) used pencil and paper to write the equations that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Moving from World War II through NASAâe(tm)s golden age, touching on the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the womenâe(tm)s rights movement, âe~Hidden Figuresâe(tm) interweaves a rich history of mankindâe(tm)s greatest adventure with the intimate stories of four courageous women whose work forever changed the world.
Posted in