The Measure of Manhattan: The Tumultuous Career and Surprising Legacy of John Randel, Jr., Cartographer, Surveyor, Inventor

Author: Marguerite Holloway

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393071251

Category: Architecture

Page: 372

View: 1047

A portrait of the nineteenth-century architect of Manhattan's city grid shares insights into his personality while surveying the innovations that enabled the developing city of Manhattan to overcome natural obstacles to infrastructure.
Posted in Architecture

The Measure of Manhattan: The Tumultuous Career and Surprising Legacy of John Randel, Jr., Cartographer, Surveyor, Inventor

Author: Marguerite Holloway

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393347906

Category: Architecture

Page: 384

View: 2549

A portrait of the 19th-century genius architect of Manhattan's city grid shares insights into his bombastic, irascible personality while surveying the controversial innovations that enabled the developing city of Manhattan to overcome natural obstacles to infrastructure. 15,000 first printing.
Posted in Architecture

Manhattan in Maps 1527-2014

Author: Paul E. Cohen,Robert T. Augustyn

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486799417

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 1159

This handsome volume features 65 full-color maps charting Manhattan's development from the first Dutch settlement to the present. Each map is placed in context by an accompanying essay.
Posted in History

Gotham Unbound

The Ecological History of Greater New York

Author: Ted Steinberg

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 147674128X

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 1970

From Henry Hudson's discovery of Manhattan to Hurricane Sandy, Steinberg provides a sweeping ecological history of one of the most man-made spots on earth. He recounts the four-century history of how hundreds of square miles of open marshlands became home to six percent of the nation's population. You will see the metropolitan area anew, not just as a dense urban goliath but as an estuary once home to miles of oyster reefs, wolves, whales, and blueberry bog thickets.
Posted in History

The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn

Gentrification and the Search for Authenticity in Postwar New York

Author: Suleiman Osman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199930341

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 9553

An original and captivating history of gentrification, this book challenges the conventional wisdom that New York City began a comeback in the 1990s, locating the roots of Brooklyn's revival in the social upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s. Osman examines the emergence of a progressive coalition as young, well-educated brownstoners joined with poorer residents to battle city planners and local machine politicians. Deftly mixing architectural, cultural, and political history, this book offers an eye-opening perspective on the post-industrial city.
Posted in History

A History of the World in 12 Maps

Author: Jerry Brotton

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0143126024

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 2424

An engaging survey of 12 maps from Ancient Greece to Google Earth examines how they have had a profound influence on how the world is seen, revealing how historical geographical depictions were subject to deliberate manipulations to promote a range of special interests. 30,000 first printing.
Posted in History

Mapping Manhattan

A Love (and Sometimes Hate) Story in Maps by 75 New Yorkers

Author: Becky Cooper

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 1613124694

Category: Art

Page: 120

View: 8332

Armed with hundreds of blank maps she had painstakingly printed by hand, Becky Cooper walked Manhattan from end to end. Along her journey she met police officers, homeless people, fashion models, and senior citizens who had lived in Manhattan all their lives. She asked the strangers to “map their Manhattan” and to mail the personalized maps back to her. Soon, her P.O. box was filled with a cartography of intimate narratives: past loves, lost homes, childhood memories, comical moments, and surprising confessions. A beautifully illustrated, PostSecret-style tribute to New York, Mapping Manhattan includes 75 maps from both anonymous mapmakers and notable New Yorkers, including Man on Wire aerialist Philippe Petit, New York Times wine critic Eric Asimov, Tony award-winning actor Harvey Fierstein, and many more. Praise for Mapping Manhattan: “What an intriguing project.”—The New York Times “A tender cartographic love letter to this timeless city of multiple dimensions, parallel realities, and perpendicular views.” —Brain Pickings “Cooper’s beautiful project linking the lives of New Yorkers is one that will continue to grow.” —Publishers Weekly online
Posted in Art

Catnip: A Love Story

Author: Michael Korda

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN: 1682681580

Category: Pets

Page: 192

View: 9093

From silly to sweet, 365 cat sketches by Michael Korda, drawn with love for his wife With the imagination of a writer and the eye of an artist, Michael Korda doodled on the backs of old manuscripts in his tackroom while his wife, Margaret, was out riding. They loved and acquired cats—a habit written about previously in their book, Cat People—and the few in residence at this time would serve as inspiration for the drawings. These are no ordinary cat illustrations, though. Korda’s cats read newspapers and books; go ice skating in the small country town where they live; comfort Margaret’s horse, Monty, after a stressful vet visit; sell fried mice at the Farmer’s Market, and undertake (on paper, at least) whatever fanciful endeavors their keeper conjures up. The result is a collection of magical pieces, filled with joy, that represent a year in the life of a couple in love with one another, and certainly with their cats.
Posted in Pets

The Historical Atlas of New York City, Second Edition

A Visual Celebration of 400 Years of New York City's History

Author: Eric Homberger

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0805078428

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 5951

A richly illustrated reference chronicles the history of New York City, from early Native American culture to the present day, capturing the events, inhabitants, neighborhoods, ethnic diversity, and more in a collection of full-color maps, period photographs, drawings, charts, and concise essays. Original. 25,000 first printing.
Posted in History

Surveyor Reference Manual

Author: George M. Cole, PhD, PE, PLS

Publisher: www.ppi2pass.com

ISBN: 1591261740

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 552

View: 2951

The Surveyor Reference Manual is the most comprehensive reference and study guide available for surveyors preparing for the Fundamentals of Surveying (FS) exam. New chapters on aerial mapping and hydrographic surveying have been added to this edition, and chapters on map projections and state plane coordinate systems, water boundaries, and riparian and littoral rights have been significantly revised. Everything you Need to Succeed on the FS exam A complete introduction to the exam, including the format and content More than 190 solved example problems and 365 additional practice problems Complete step-by-step solutions for every practice problem A full glossary of terms "The Land Surveyor Reference Manual successfully prepared me for the exam and is now the backbone of my reference collection." -J. Forest McKenzie II, E.I.T., L.S.I.T. Civil Designer ADC Engineering, Inc.
Posted in Technology & Engineering

A Vast Machine

Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

Author: Paul N. Edwards

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262290715

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 546

View: 2025

Global warming skeptics often fall back on the argument that the scientific case for global warming is all model predictions, nothing but simulation; they warn us that we need to wait for real data, "sound science." In A Vast Machine Paul Edwards has news for these skeptics: without models, there are no data. Today, no collection of signals or observations -- even from satellites, which can "see" the whole planet with a single instrument -- becomes global in time and space without passing through a series of data models. Everything we know about the world's climate we know through models. Edwards offers an engaging and innovative history of how scientists learned to understand the atmosphere -- to measure it, trace its past, and model its future.
Posted in Technology & Engineering

Spying on Democracy

Government Surveillance, Corporate Power and Public Resistance

Author: Heidi Boghosian,Lewis Lapham

Publisher: City Lights Books

ISBN: 0872866033

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 4521

Spying on US citizens is rising as corporations make big bucks selling info about our private lives to the government.
Posted in Law

Theory in Archaeology

A World Perspective

Author: Peter J. Ucko

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134843461

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 4701

Theory in Archaeology tackles important questions about the diversity in archaeological theory and practice which face the discipline in the 1990s. What is the relationship between theory and practice? How does `World' archaeological theory differ from `European'? Can one be a good practitioner without theory? This unique book brings together contributors from many different countries and continents to provide the first truly global perspective on archaeological theory. They examine the nature of material culture studies and look at problems of ethnicity, regionalism, and nationality. They consider, too, another fundamental of archaeological inquiry: can our research be objective, or must `the past' always be a relativistic construction? Theory in Archaeology is an important book whose authors bring together very different perceptions of the past. Its wide scope and interest will attract an international readership among students and academics alike.
Posted in Social Science

Encyclopedia of African American History [3 volumes]

Author: Leslie M Alexander,Walter C. Rucker Jr.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1851097740

Category: Social Science

Page: 1136

View: 987

A fresh compilation of essays and entries based on the latest research, this work documents African American culture and political activism from the slavery era through the 20th century. • Contributions from over 100 specialists on African America and the African diaspora • A spectacular selection of illustrations and photographs, such as a Kongo cosmogram, the African burial ground in New York City, and maps of the Triangular Trade and the Underground Railroad
Posted in Social Science

The Smoke of the Gods

A Social History of Tobacco

Author: Eric Burns

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781592134823

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 5982

"Fox News Watch" host Eric Burns, who chronicled the social history of alcohol in The Spirits of America turns to tobacco in The Smoke of the Gods. Ranging from ancient times to the present day, The Smoke of the Gods is a lively history of tobacco, especially in the United States. Although tobacco use is controversial in the U.S. today, Burns reminds us that this was not always the case. For centuries tobacco was generally thought to have medicinal and even spiritual value. Most of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were tobacco users or growers, or both. According to Burns, tobacco changed the very course of U.S. history, because its discovery caused the British to support Jamestown, its struggling New World colony. An entertaining and informative look at a subject that makes daily news headlines, The Smoke of the Gods is a history that is, well, quite addictive.
Posted in History

The Map Thief

The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps

Author: Michael Blanding

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698156986

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 3976

The story of an infamous crime, a revered map dealer with an unsavory secret, and the ruthless subculture that consumed him Maps have long exerted a special fascination on viewers—both as beautiful works of art and as practical tools to navigate the world. But to those who collect them, the map trade can be a cutthroat business, inhabited by quirky and sometimes disreputable characters in search of a finite number of extremely rare objects. Once considered a respectable antiquarian map dealer, E. Forbes Smiley spent years doubling as a map thief —until he was finally arrested slipping maps out of books in the Yale University library. The Map Thief delves into the untold history of this fascinating high-stakes criminal and the inside story of the industry that consumed him. Acclaimed reporter Michael Blanding has interviewed all the key players in this stranger-than-fiction story, and shares the fascinating histories of maps that charted the New World, and how they went from being practical instruments to quirky heirlooms to highly coveted objects. Though pieces of the map theft story have been written before, Blanding is the first reporter to explore the story in full—and had the rare privilege of having access to Smiley himself after he’d gone silent in the wake of his crimes. Moreover, although Smiley swears he has admitted to all of the maps he stole, libraries claim he stole hundreds more—and offer intriguing clues to prove it. Now, through a series of exclusive interviews with Smiley and other key individuals, Blanding teases out an astonishing tale of destruction and redemption. The Map Thief interweaves Smiley’s escapades with the stories of the explorers and mapmakers he knew better than anyone. Tracking a series of thefts as brazen as the art heists in Provenance and a subculture as obsessive as the oenophiles in The Billionaire’s Vinegar, Blanding has pieced together an unforgettable story of high-stakes crime.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

City on a Grid

How New York Became New York

Author: Gerard Koeppel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0306822849

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 9882

The never-before-told story of the grid that ate Manhattan
Posted in History

Unruly Places

Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies

Author: Alastair Bonnett

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 054410160X

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 9245

A tour of the world’s hidden geographies—from disappearing islands to forbidden deserts—and a stunning testament to how mysterious the world remains today At a time when Google Maps Street View can take you on a virtual tour of Yosemite’s remotest trails and cell phones double as navigational systems, it’s hard to imagine there’s any uncharted ground left on the planet. In Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett goes to some of the most unexpected, offbeat places in the world to reinspire our geographical imagination. Bonnett’s remarkable tour includes moving villages, secret cities, no man’s lands, and floating islands. He explores places as disorienting as Sandy Island, an island included on maps until just two years ago despite the fact that it never existed. Or Sealand, an abandoned gun platform off the English coast that a British citizen claimed as his own sovereign nation, issuing passports and crowning his wife as a princess. Or Baarle, a patchwork of Dutch and Flemish enclaves where walking from the grocery store’s produce section to the meat counter can involve crossing national borders. An intrepid guide down the road much less traveled, Bonnett reveals that the most extraordinary places on earth might be hidden in plain sight, just around the corner from your apartment or underfoot on a wooded path. Perfect for urban explorers, wilderness ramblers, and armchair travelers struck by wanderlust, Unruly Places will change the way you see the places you inhabit.
Posted in Social Science

Walking Zero

Discovering Cosmic Space and Time Along the Prime Meridian

Author: Chet Raymo

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780802718273

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 1524

In Walking Zero, Chet Raymo uses the Prime Meridian-the line of zero longitude and the standard for all the world's maps and clocks-to tell the story of humandkind's intellectual journey from a cosmos not much larger than ourselves to the universe of the galaxies and geologic eons. As in his highly praised The Path and Climbing Brandon, Raymo connects personally with the story by walking England's Prime Meridian from Brighton through Greenwich to the North Sea. The Prime Meridian passes near a surprising number of landmarks that loom large in science: Isaac Newton's chambers at Trinity College, Cambridge; Charles Darwin's home at Down, in Kent; the site where the first dinosaur fossils were discovered; and John Harrison's clocks in a museum room of the Royal Observatory, among many others. Visiting them in turn, Raymo brings to life the human dramas of courageous individuals who bucked reigning orthodoxies to expand our horizons, including one brave rebel who paid the ultimate price for surmising the multitude of worlds we now take for granted. A splendid short history of astronomy and geology, Walking Zero illuminates the startling interplay of science, psychology, faith, and the arts in our understanding of space and time.
Posted in Science

The Clockwork Universe

saac Newto, Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern WorldI

Author: Edward Dolnick

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062042262

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9381

New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history—when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world. Dolnick’s earth-changing story of Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the birth of modern science is at once an entertaining romp through the annals of academic history, in the vein of Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, and a captivating exploration of a defining time for scientific progress, in the tradition of Richard Holmes’ The Age of Wonder.
Posted in History