The Lonely City

Adventures in the Art of Being Alone

Author: Olivia Laing

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 1250039592

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 8178

An expertly crafted work of reportage, memoir and biography on the subject of loneliness told through the lives of iconic artists, by the acclaimed author of The Trip to Echo Spring What does it mean to be lonely? How do we live, if we're not intimately engaged with another human being? How do we connect with other people? Does technology draw us closer together or trap us behind screens? When Olivia Laing moved to New York City in her mid-thirties, she found herself inhabiting loneliness on a daily basis. Increasingly fascinated by this most shameful of experiences, she began to explore the lonely city by way of art. Moving fluidly between works and lives - from Edward Hopper's Nighthawks to Andy Warhol's Time Capsules, from Henry Darger's hoarding to the depredations of the AIDS crisis - Laing conducts an electric, dazzling investigation into what it means to be alone, illuminating not only the causes of loneliness but also how it might be resisted and redeemed. Humane, provocative and deeply moving, The Lonely City is about the spaces between people and the things that draw them together, about sexuality, mortality and the magical possibilities of art. It's a celebration of a strange and lovely state, adrift from the larger continent of human experience, but intrinsic to the very act of being alive.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Lonely City

Adventures in the Art of Being Alone

Author: Olivia Laing

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN: 1782111247

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 9366

SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2016 GORDON BURN PRIZE CHOSEN AS 'BOOK OF THE YEAR' BY Observer Guardian Telegraph Irish Times New Statesman Times Literary Supplement Herald When Olivia Laing moved to New York City in her mid-thirties, she found herself inhabiting loneliness on a daily basis. Increasingly fascinated by this most shameful of experiences, she began to explore the lonely city by way of art. Moving fluidly between the works and lives of some of the city's most compelling artists, Laing conducts an electric, dazzling investigation into what it means to be alone, illuminating not only the causes of loneliness but also how it might be resisted and redeemed.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Lonely City

Adventures in the Art of Being Alone

Author: Olivia Laing

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250039576

Category: Art

Page: 336

View: 4398

"You can be lonely anywhere, but there is a particular flavor to the loneliness that comes from living in a city, surrounded by thousands of strangers. The Lonely City is a roving cultural history of urban loneliness, centered on the ultimate city: Manhattan, that teeming island of gneiss, concrete, and glass. What does it mean to be lonely? How do we live, if we're not intimately involved with another human being? How do we connect with other people, particularly if our sexuality or physical body is considered deviant or damaged? Does technology draw us closer together or trap us behind screens? Olivia Laing explores these questions by travelling deep into the work and lives of some of the century's most original artists, among them Andy Warhol, David Wojnarowicz, Edward Hopper, Henry Darger and Klaus Nomi. Part memoir, part biography, part dazzling work of cultural criticism, The Lonely City is not just a map, but a celebration of the state of loneliness. It's a voyage out to a strange and sometimes lovely island, adrift from the larger continent of human experience, but visited by many - millions, say - of souls"--
Posted in Art

The Trip to Echo Spring

On Writers and Drinking

Author: Olivia Laing

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 9781250063731

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 7427

A New York Times Notable Book of 2014 A Time Magazine Notable Book of 2014 Olivia Laing's widely acclaimed account of how writers in the grip of alcoholism created some of the greatest works of American literature In The Trip to Echo Spring, Olivia Laing takes a journey across America, examining the links between creativity and alcohol in the work and lives of six extraordinary men: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, John Berryman, John Cheever, and Raymond Carver. Captivating and highly original, The Trip to Echo Spring strips away the myth of the alcoholic writer to reveal the terrible price creativity can exert.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

To the River

A Journey Beneath the Surface

Author: Olivia Laing

Publisher: Canongate Books Limited

ISBN: 9781847677938

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 283

View: 2160

To the River is the story of the Ouse, the Sussex river in which Virginia Woolf drowned in 1941. One idyllic, midsummer week over sixty years later, Olivia Laing walked Woolf's river from source to sea. The result is a passionate investigation into how history resides in a landscape - and how ghosts never quite leave the places they love.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Crudo

Author: Olivia Laing

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1509892850

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 9171

Kathy is a writer. Kathy is getting married. It’s the summer of 2017 and the whole world is falling apart. From a Tuscan hotel for the super-rich to a Brexit-paralysed UK, Kathy spends the first summer of her 40s trying to adjust to making a lifelong commitment just as Trump is tweeting the world into nuclear war. But it’s not only Kathy who’s changing. Political, social and natural landscapes are all in peril. Fascism is on the rise, truth is dead, the planet is hotting up. Is it really worth learning to love when the end of the world is nigh? And how do you make art, let alone a life, when one rogue tweet could end it all. Olivia Laing radically rewires the novel in a brilliant, funny and emphatically raw account of love in the apocalypse. A Goodbye to Berlin for the 21st century, Crudo charts in real time what it was like to live and love in the horrifying summer of 2017, from the perspective of a commitment-phobic peripatetic artist who may or may not be Kathy Acker . . .
Posted in Fiction

Fire in the Belly

The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz

Author: Cynthia Carr

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

ISBN: 9781608194193

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 624

View: 4631

David Wojnarowicz was an abused child, a teen runaway who barely finished high school, but he emerged as one of the most important voices of his generation. He found his tribe in New York’s East Village, a neighborhood noted in the 1970s and ’80s for drugs, blight, and a burgeoning art scene. His creativity spilled out in paintings, photographs, films, texts, installations, and in his life and its recounting—creating a sort of mythos around himself. His circle of East Village artists moved into the national spotlight just as the AIDS plague began its devastating advance, and as right-wing culture warriors reared their heads. As Wojnarowicz’s reputation as an artist grew, so did his reputation as an agitator—because he dealt so openly with his homosexuality, so angrily with his circumstances as a Person With AIDS, and so fiercely with his would-be censors. Fire in the Belly is the untold story of a polarizing figure at a pivotal moment in American culture—and one of the most highly acclaimed biographies of the year.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Gentrification of the Mind

Witness to a Lost Imagination

Author: Sarah Schulman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520280067

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 6585

In this memoir of the AIDS years (1981-1996) in New York, CUNY Professor of English Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the queer culture, cheap rents, and virbrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight, replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism. Schulman takes us back to her Lower East Side and brings it to life, sharing vivid memories of her avant-garde queer friends and recreating the early years of the AIDS crisis as experienced by a political insider. Interweaving personal reminiscence with analysis, Schulman details her experience as a witness to the loss of a generation's imagination and the consequences of that loss.--From publisher description.
Posted in History

A Philosophy of Loneliness

Author: Lars Svendsen

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780237936

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 9047

For many of us it is the ultimate fear: to die alone. Loneliness is a difficult subject to address because it has such negative connotations in our intensely social world. But the truth is that wherever there are people, there is loneliness. You can be lonely sitting in the quiet of your home, in the still of an afternoon park, or even when surrounded by throngs of people on a busy street. One need only turn on the radio to hear a crooner telling us just how lonesome we can be. In this groundbreaking book, philosopher Lars Svendsen confronts loneliness head on, investigating both the negative and positive sides of this most human of emotions. Drawing on the latest research in philosophy, psychology, and the social sciences, A Philosophy of Loneliness explores the different kinds of loneliness and examines the psychological and social characteristics that dispose people to them. Svendsen looks at the importance of friendship and love, and he examines how loneliness can impact our quality of life and affect our physical and mental health. In a provocative move, he also argues that the main problem in our modern society is not that we have too much loneliness but rather too little solitude, and he looks to those moments when our loneliness can actually tell us profound things about ourselves and our place in the world. The result is a fascinating book about a complex and deeply meaningful part of our very being.
Posted in Philosophy

In the Wolf's Mouth

Author: Adam Foulds

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448181615

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 6217

From the author of the Man Booker shortlisted The Quickening Maze In the Wolf’s Mouth follows the lives of four very different men, all of them navigating the chaos and horror brought about by the Second World War. Fighting for the Allies are Will Walker, an ambitious English Field Security Officer and Ray Marfione, a wide-eyed Italian-American infantryman who dreams of home and the movies. Meanwhile in Sicily, Angilù, a young shepherd caught up in corruption and Cirò Albanese, a sinister Mafioso, are fighting their own battles with devastating consequences.
Posted in Fiction

How to Do Nothing with Nobody All Alone by Yourself

Author: Robert Paul Smith

Publisher: Tin House Books

ISBN: 0982504845

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 130

View: 1948

The classic guidebook to everything from paper airplanes to spool tanks to slingshots is back in print, and is as fun, inventive, and charming as ever. How to Do Nothing literally tells "how to do nothing with nobody all alone by yourself"—real things, fascinating things, the things that you did when you were a kid, or your parents did when they were kids. This is a book to free your kid from video games for a few hours, a handbook on the avoidance of boredom, a primer on the uses of solitude, a child's declaration of independence. If you don't remember how to make a spool tank, what to do with an old umbrella, whether "pennies" come before or after "spank the baby" in mumbly-peg, or how to make rubber-band guns, slings, or clamshell bracelets, it's OK because Robert Paul Smith has collected all of this and more in How to Do Nothing. It's a book for kids, but parents are not prohibited from reading it.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

The Vanishing Velázquez

A 19th Century Bookseller's Obsession with a Lost Masterpiece

Author: Laura Cumming

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476762163

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 9079

“As compelling and entertaining as a detective novel” (The Economist), the incredible true story—part art history and part mystery—of a Velázquez portrait that went missing and the obsessed nineteenth-century bookseller determined to prove he had found it. When John Snare, a nineteenth century provincial bookseller, traveled to a liquidation auction, he found a vivid portrait of King Charles I that defied any explanation. The Charles of the painting was young—too young to be king—and yet also too young to be painted by the Flemish painter to whom the piece was attributed. Snare had found something incredible—but what? His research brought him to Diego Velázquez, whose long-lost portrait of Prince Charles has eluded art experts for generations. Velázquez (1599–1660) was the official painter of the Madrid court, during the time the Spanish Empire teetered on the edge of collapse. When Prince Charles of England—a man wealthy enough to help turn Spain’s fortunes—proposed a marriage with a Spanish princess, he allowed just a few hours to sit for his portrait, and Snare believed only Velázquez could have been the artist of choice. But in making his theory public, Snare was ostracized and forced to choose, like Velázquez himself, between art and family. A thrilling investigation into the complex meaning of authenticity and the unshakable determination that drives both artists and collectors of their work, The Vanishing Velázquez is a “brilliant” (The Atlantic) tale of mystery and detection, of tragic mishaps and mistaken identities, of class, politics, snobbery, crime, and almost farcical accident that reveals how one historic masterpiece was crafted and lost, and how far one man would go to redeem it. Laura Cumming’s book is “sumptuous...A gleaming work of someone at the peak of her craft” (The New York Times).
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Close to the Knives

A Memoir of Disintegration

Author: David Wojnarowicz

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN: 1786890283

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 2344

I am glad I am alive to witness these things; giving words to this life of sensations is a relief. Smell the flowers while you can. Close to the Knives is the artist, writer and activist David Wojnarowicz's extraordinary memoir. Filthy, beautiful, and sharp to the point of piercing, it is both an exploration of the world seen through the eyes of an artist, and a moving portrait of a generation living, grieving, and dying through the AIDS crisis. It is a triumphant hymn of resistance, and a dizzying celebration of the joys of seeing and living in the world.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

How To Be Alone

Author: Jonathan Franzen

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 1443432598

Category: Fiction

Page: 324

View: 1181

From Jonathan Franzen, the National Book Award–winning author of The Corrections, come fourteen provocative and entertaining answers to the question of how to be alone in a noisy and distracting mass culture. Although Franzen’s subjects range from the sex-advice industry to the way a supermax prison works, each piece wrestles with essential themes of his writing: the erosion of civic life and private dignity, the dubious claims of technology and psychology, the tragic shape of the individual life. Recent pieces include a moving essay on his father’s struggle with Alzheimer’s disease and a rueful account of Franzen’s brief tenure as an Oprah Winfrey author. This is a book that will further cement Franzen’s reputation as one of the sharpest, toughest, and liveliest writers at work today.
Posted in Fiction

Living Alone and Loving It

Author: Barbara Feldon

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416586423

Category: Self-Help

Page: 176

View: 520

After a relationship impasse, Barbara Feldon -- universally known as the effervescent spy "99" on Get Smart -- found herself living alone. Little did she know that this time would become one of the most enriching and joyous periods of her life. Now Feldon shares her secrets for living alone and loving it. Prescribing antidotes for loneliness, salves for fears, and answers for just about every question that arises in an unpartnered day, she covers both the practical and emotional aspects of the solo life, including how to: Stop imagining that marriage is a solution for loneliness • Nurture a glowing self-image that is not dependent on an admirer • Value connections that might be overlooked • Develop your creative side • End negative thinking Whether you are blessed with the promise of youth or the wisdom of age, Living Alone & Loving It will instill the know-how to forge a life with few maps and many adventures.
Posted in Self-Help

The Art of Stillness

Adventures in Going Nowhere

Author: Pico Iyer

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476784728

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 96

View: 7900

Explores why modern-day technology is making people more likely to retreat into solitude and quiet, with growing numbers of people practicing yoga, meditation and tai chi and even taking an “Internet Sabbath” where online connections are shut down for a day. 50,000 first printing.
Posted in Health & Fitness

About the Art of Being Alone

How to Overcome Loneliness and the Fear of Being Alone While Learning to Love Yourself

Author: Janett Menzel

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781548945282

Category:

Page: 190

View: 2190

Do you constantly need people to be around you to feel fulfilled and satisfied? Do you feel empty when you have no one who is with you? Do you look for partners and lovers to feel loved, wanted and "enough" although they later turn out to be the wrong choice? Are you constantly waiting for partners who don't love you as much as you love them, hoping that they will be ready for a committed relationship one day? Then you might attract them unconsciously because deep down you are afraid of being alone. This book is dedicated to all those who want to understand their fear of being alone and their loneliness and transform it into self-love. The author Janett Menzel takes the reader along on a journey of discovery: what type you are, where the fear and depressive emotions come from, what they want to say to you and how you can overcome them with self-recognition. However, instead of fighting it, she suggests examining it carefully, understanding the emptiness and lesson, and, finally, transforming it. With over 70 strategies and reinventions of your own character and life, the author helps the readers to expose and decouple old belief systems, recognize dependencies, and resolve blockades.
Posted in

This is the Place to be

Author: Lara Pawson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781909585218

Category: Journalists

Page: 124

View: 6954

A memoir in the form of a series of sharply etched vignettes that shift astonishingly in time and mood, and range in place from Africa and the US to the streets of London. It demonstrates that no moment is isolated, and that privilege, conflict, race and gender are inherent in all our encounters, from the banal to the extreme
Posted in Journalists

The Private Life

Why We Remain in the Dark

Author: Josh Cohen

Publisher: Counterpoint LLC

ISBN: 9781619024977

Category: Psychology

Page: 223

View: 4629

Examines how modern culture, with its social media and constant communication, advocates an exploration of the private unconscious.
Posted in Psychology

Flâneuse

Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice, and London

Author: Lauren Elkin

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374715890

Category: Travel

Page: 336

View: 1567

The New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice The flâneur is the quintessentially masculine figure of privilege and leisure who strides the capitals of the world with abandon. But it is the flâneuse who captures the imagination of the cultural critic Lauren Elkin. In her wonderfully gender-bending new book, the flâneuse is a “determined, resourceful individual keenly attuned to the creative potential of the city and the liberating possibilities of a good walk.” Virginia Woolf called it “street haunting”; Holly Golightly epitomized it in Breakfast at Tiffany’s; and Patti Smith did it in her own inimitable style in 1970s New York. Part cultural meander, part memoir, Flâneuse takes us on a distinctly cosmopolitan jaunt that begins in New York, where Elkin grew up, and transports us to Paris via Venice, Tokyo, and London, all cities in which she’s lived. We are shown the paths beaten by such flâneuses as the cross-dressing nineteenth-century novelist George Sand, the Parisian artist Sophie Calle, the wartime correspondent Martha Gellhorn, and the writer Jean Rhys. With tenacity and insight, Elkin creates a mosaic of what urban settings have meant to women, charting through literature, art, history, and film the sometimes exhilarating, sometimes fraught relationship that women have with the metropolis. Called “deliciously spiky and seditious” by The Guardian, Flâneuse will inspire you to light out for the great cities yourself.
Posted in Travel