The Lives of Hawaii's Dolphins and Whales

Natural History and Conservation

Author: Robin W. Baird

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780824859985

Category: Nature

Page: 304

View: 7965

Ocean currents, winds, and rainfall all work together to create a marine oasis around the Hawaiian Islands, providing a home for many species of dolphins and whales normally found in the deep oceans of the world. The Lives of Hawai`i's Dolphins and Whales provides a window into the world of these mysterious creatures with stories and observations from author Robin W. Baird's work with Hawaiian whales and dolphins over the last seventeen years. The book can be used as a field guide, as it includes full-color photographs of each species, life history descriptions, conservation threats, and maps showing sighting locations and movements of tagged individuals among the islands and offshore. Although this work covers the well-known resident spinner dolphins and the visiting humpback whales, it particularly highlights the ten species of lesser-known open-ocean dolphins and whales that are resident to the marine slopes of the islands. These include endangered false killer whales, deep-diving Cuvier's and Blainville's beaked whales, abundant spotted dolphins, coastal bottlenose dolphins, cryptic dwarf sperm whales, family units of short-finned pilot whales, and social melon-headed whales, among others. Also described are thirteen species of dolphins and whales found in offshore waters or that visit the Hawaiian waters seasonally or occasionally, including killer whales, the iconic sperm whale, and even blue whales and North Pacific right whales. More is known about the social organization and natural history of many of the species in Hawai`i than anywhere else in the world; much of the data resulting from studies using genetics and satellite tagging. For all species discussed, Baird presents information obtained from long-term photo-identification studies, with distinctive individuals tracked through time and space. He also provides information on predators and prey, social organization, diving, and night-time behavior, along with suggestions on how to tell some of the more difficult to identify species apart. Baird concludes by exploring conservation issues, both success stories and challenges, and engages readers to consider ways to protect Hawai`i's unique assemblage of resident dolphins and whales.
Posted in Nature

Hawaii's Humpbacks

Unveiling the Mysteries

Author: Jim Darling,Flip Nicklin

Publisher: Granville Island Pub

ISBN: 9781894694599

Category: Nature

Page: 239

View: 3422

This guide explains what researchers have learned about humpback whales on their winter breeding grounds in Hawaii. Spectacular color photos help whale watchers and educators identify and understand humpback behavior. Proceeds support whale research.
Posted in Nature

Face to Face with Dolphins

Author: Flip Nicklin,Linda Nicklin

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 1426305494

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 475

A colorful introduction to the world of the dolphin.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

Voices in the Ocean

A Journey into the Wild and Haunting World of Dolphins

Author: Susan Casey

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 038553731X

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 8755

From Susan Casey, the New York Times bestselling author of The Wave and The Devil’s Teeth, a breathtaking journey through the extraordinary world of dolphins Since the dawn of recorded history, humans have felt a kinship with the sleek and beautiful dolphin, an animal whose playfulness, sociability, and intelligence seem like an aquatic mirror of mankind. In recent decades, we have learned that dolphins recognize themselves in reflections, count, grieve, adorn themselves, feel despondent, rescue one another (and humans), deduce, infer, seduce, form cliques, throw tantrums, and call themselves by name. Scientists still don’t completely understand their incredibly sophisticated navigation and communication abilities, or their immensely complicated brains. While swimming off the coast of Maui, Susan Casey was surrounded by a pod of spinner dolphins. It was a profoundly transporting experience, and it inspired her to embark on a two-year global adventure to explore the nature of these remarkable beings and their complex relationship to humanity. Casey examines the career of the controversial John Lilly, the pioneer of modern dolphin studies whose work eventually led him down some very strange paths. She visits a community in Hawaii whose adherents believe dolphins are the key to spiritual enlightenment, travels to Ireland, where a dolphin named as “the world’s most loyal animal” has delighted tourists and locals for decades with his friendly antics, and consults with the world’s leading marine researchers, whose sense of wonder inspired by the dolphins they study increases the more they discover. Yet there is a dark side to our relationship with dolphins. They are the stars of a global multibillion-dollar captivity industry, whose money has fueled a sinister and lucrative trade in which dolphins are captured violently, then shipped and kept in brutal conditions. Casey’s investigation into this cruel underground takes her to the harrowing epicenter of the trade in the Solomon Islands, and to the Japanese town of Taiji, made famous by the Oscar-winning documentary The Cove, where she chronicles the annual slaughter and sale of dolphins in its narrow bay. Casey ends her narrative on the island of Crete, where millennia-old frescoes and artwork document the great Minoan civilization, a culture which lived in harmony with dolphins, and whose example shows the way to a more enlightened coexistence with the natural world. No writer is better positioned to portray these magical creatures than Susan Casey, whose combination of personal reporting, intense scientific research, and evocative prose made The Wave and The Devil’s Teeth contemporary classics of writing about the sea. In Voices in the Ocean, she has written a thrilling book about the other intelligent life on the planet. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Nature

Encyclopedia of Marine Mammals

Author: Bernd Würsig,J.G.M. Thewissen,Kit M. Kovacs

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 0128043814

Category: Science

Page: 1190

View: 5118

The Encyclopedia of Marine Mammals, Third Edition covers the ecology, behavior, conservation, evolution, form and function of whales, dolphins, seals, sea lions, manatees, dugongs, otters and polar bears. This edition provides new content on anthropogenic concerns, latest information on emerging threats such as ocean noise, and impacts of climate change. With authors and editors who are world experts, this new edition is a critical resource for all who are interested in marine mammals, especially upper level undergraduate and graduate students, researchers, and managers, and is a top reference for those in related fields, from oceanographers to environmental scientists. Significant content and topic updates, as well as the addition of new topics in such areas as anthropogenic disturbance Visual maps of the oceans and seas mentioned in contributions, helping to place the geographical features described in the text with clear, consistent species illustrations Written to help users learn new information or brush up on a topic quickly, with the references at the end of each entry to help guide readers into more specialist literature
Posted in Science

Face to Face with Whales

Author: Flip Nicklin,Linda Nicklin

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 9781426306976

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 2368

Close-up photographs and personal stories of encounters with whales by the authors.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises

A Natural History and Species Guide

Author: Annalisa Berta

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022618319X

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 7482

The eighty-nine cetacean species that swim our seas and rivers are as diverse as they are intelligent and elusive, from the hundred-foot-long, two-hundred-ton blue whale to the lesser-known tucuxi, ginkgo-toothed beaked whale, and diminutive, critically endangered vaquita. The huge distances these highly migratory creatures cover and the depths they dive mean we catch only the merest glimpses of their lives as they break the surface of the water. But thanks to the marriage of science and technology, we are now beginning to understand their anatomy, complex social structures, extraordinary communication abilities, and behavioral patterns. In this beautifully illustrated guide, renowned marine mammalogist Annalisa Berta draws on the contributions of a pod of fellow whale biologists to present the most comprehensive, authoritative overview ever published of these remarkable aquatic mammals. Opening with an accessible rundown of cetacean biology—including the most recent science on feeding, mating, and communication—Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises then presents species-specific natural history on a range of topics, from anatomy and diet to distribution and conservation status. Each entry also includes original drawings of the species and its key identifiers, such as fin shape and color, tooth shape, and characteristic markings as they would appear both above and below water—a feature unique to this book. Figures of myth and—as the debate over hunting rages on—figures of conflict since long before the days of Moby-Dick, whales, dolphins, and porpoises are also ecologically important and, in many cases, threatened. Written for general enthusiasts, emergent cetacean fans, and biologists alike, this stunning, urgently needed book will serve as the definitive guide for years to come.
Posted in Nature

The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins

Author: Hal Whitehead,Luke Rendell

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226895319

Category: Science

Page: 417

View: 5023

Drawing on their own research as well as scientific literature including evolutionary biology, animal behavior, ecology, anthropology, psychology and neuroscience, two cetacean biologists submerge themselves in the unique environment in which whales and dolphins live.
Posted in Science

Anatomy of Dolphins

Insights into Body Structure and Function

Author: Bruno Cozzi,Stefan Huggenberger,Helmut A Oelschläger

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 0124076556

Category: Science

Page: 456

View: 1802

The Anatomy of Dolphins: Insights into Body Structure and Function is a precise, detailed, fully illustrated, descriptive, and functionally oriented text on the anatomy and morphology of dolphins. It focuses on a number of delphinid species, with keynotes on important dolphin-like genera, such as the harbor porpoise. It also serves as a useful complement for expanding trends and emphases in molecular biology and genetics. The authors share their life-long expertise on marine mammals in various disciplines. Written as a team rather than being prepared as a collection of separate contributions, the result is a uniform and comprehensive style, giving each of the different topics appropriate space. Many color figures, which use the authors’ access to wide collections of unique dolphin and whale material, round out this exceptional offering to the field. Includes high-quality illustrations, drawings, halftone artwork, photographic documentations, microphotos, and tables detailing dolphin anatomy, function, and morphology Facilitates education and training of students of all basic research and applied sciences dedicated to marine biology and the medical care of marine mammals Brings together the current knowledge and information on this topic, including those in obscure past or non-English publications, or scattered in short chapters in volumes Covers a number of delphinid species and serves as a useful complement for expanding trends in molecular biology and genetics
Posted in Science

The Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin

Author: Kenneth S. Norris,Bernd Wursig,Randall S. Wells,Melany Wursig

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520913547

Category: Science

Page: 436

View: 5420

Twenty years in the making by a distinguished dolphin expert and his associates, The Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin is the first comprehensive scientific natural history of a dolphin species ever written. From their research camp at Kealakeakua Bay in Hawaii, these scientists followed a population of wild spinner dolphins by radiotracking their movements and, with the use of a windowed underwater vessel, observing the details of their underwater social life. The authors begin with a description of the spinner dolphin species, its morphology and systematics, and then examine the ocean environment, the organization of dolphin populations, and the way this school-based society of mammals uses shorelines for rest and instruction of the young. The dolphins' reproductive cycle, their vision, vocalization, hearing, breathing, and feeding, and the integration of the school are carefully analyzed. The authors conclude with a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of this marine cultural system, with its behavioral flexibility and high levels of cooperation. This absorbing book is the richest source available of new scientific insights about the lives of wild dophins and how their societies evolved at sea.
Posted in Science

Marine Mammals: Fisheries, Tourism and Management Issues

Fisheries, Tourism and Management Issues

Author: Nicholas Gales,Mark Hindell,Roger Kirkwood

Publisher: CSIRO PUBLISHING

ISBN: 0643099263

Category: Science

Page: 460

View: 1038

Marine Mammals: Fisheries, Tourism and Management Issues brings together contributions from 68 leading scientists from 12 countries to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review on the way we manage our interactions with whales, dolphins, seals and dugongs. The book examines how we have fared conserving the world’s marine mammal populations, with a focus on the key issues of fisheries and tourism. From a unique southern hemisphere perspective, the authors consider how science informs the culling debate, how wild fisheries and aquaculture interact with marine mammal populations and how we might manage the effects of whale, dolphin and seal watching industries. The authors also address other issues such as the way in which ethics, genetics, acoustics, ecosystem models and pollution influence the management and conservation of marine mammals. Marine Mammals is an invaluable and accessible resource for all those involved with marine mammals, including scientists, managers, policy makers, industry representatives and students. Winner of a 2004 Whitley Award.
Posted in Science

Hawaii's Humpback Whales

Author: Gregory D. Kaufman,Paul H. Forestell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780896102811

Category: Nature

Page: 192

View: 3951

Posted in Nature

North Atlantic Right Whales

From Hunted Leviathan to Conservation Icon

Author: David W. Laist

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421420996

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 522

In the cold waters of the unforgiving North Atlantic Ocean, some of the heartiest humans of medieval days ventured out in search of whales. Through the centuries, people on both sides of the Atlantic became increasingly dependent on whale oil and other cetacean products. To meet this growing demand, whaling became ever more sophisticated and intense, leading to the collapse of what was once a seemingly inexhaustible supply of large cetaceans. Central to the whale’s subsequent struggle for existence has been one species--the North Atlantic right whale. Conservationist David W. Laist now provides the first complete history of the North Atlantic right whale, from its earliest encounters with humans to its close brush with extinction, to its currently precarious yet hopeful status as a conservation icon. Favored by whalers because of their high yields of oil and superior baleen, these giants became known as "the right whale to hunt," and their numbers dwindled to a mere 100 individuals worldwide. Their dire status encouraged the adoption of a ban on hunting and a treaty that formed the International Whaling Commission. Recovery of the species, however, has proven elusive. Ship strikes and entanglement in commercial fishing gear have hampered herculean efforts to restore the population. Today, only about 500 right whales live along the US and Canadian Atlantic coasts--an improvement from the early twentieth century, but still a far cry from the thousands that once graced Atlantic waters. Laist’s masterpiece features an incredible collection of photographs and artwork that give life to the fascinating history that unfolds in its pages. The result is a single volume that offers a comprehensive understanding of North Atlantic right whales, the role they played in the many cultures that hunted them, and our modern attempts to help them recover. -- James G. Mead, Curator Emeritus of Marine Mammals, Smithsonian Institution
Posted in Science

War of the Whales

A True Story

Author: Joshua Horwitz

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451645015

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 4742

Documents the efforts of crusading lawyer Joel Renolds and marine biologist Ken Balcolm to expose a covert U.S. Navy sub detection system that caused whales to beach themselves, an effort that challenged Ken's loyalties and pitted them against powerful military adversaries.
Posted in History

Encyclopedia of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises

Author: Eric Hoyt

Publisher: Firefly Books

ISBN: 9781770859418

Category: Nature

Page: 300

View: 7244

In the Encyclopedia of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises, award-winning author and whale researcher Erich Hoyt takes readers into the field for an intimate encounter with some 90 species of cetaceans that make their homes in the world's oceans. Drawing on decades of firsthand experience and a comprehensive familiarity with the current revolution in cetacean studies, Hoyt provides unique insights into the life histories of these compelling marine mammals. Here are discoveries about cetacean biology and behavior, from the physical differences and adaptations among the baleen and toothed whales to their highly intelligent hunting and feeding methods. The courtship and mating practices, family relationships and the lifelong bonds among some family members are fascinating. The symphonic composer of the whale world is the humpback whale, whose complex 30-minute songs reverberate across the liquid universe of the ocean. Some cetaceans survive deep diving and negotiate lengthy migrations across oceans. This book is a fascinating compilation of the latest data on cetaceans and an impassioned argument for the ongoing need for international protection of at-risk populations and their increasingly damaged habitat. Encyclopedia of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises includes: detailed profiles of 90 current species of cetaceans a report on the newly discovered species in the genus Berardius, a small black form related to the Baird's beaked whale fascinating sidebars that bring to life cetacean society and culture an enlightening discussion of the differences between dolphins and porpoises new information on the history and impact of whaling illustrations of each species by renowned artist Uko Gorter color photographs by world-famous marine photographer Brandon Cole, among others.
Posted in Nature

The Extreme Life of the Sea

Author: Stephen R. Palumbi,Anthony R. Palumbi

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400849934

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 5324

The ocean teems with life that thrives under difficult situations in unusual environments. The Extreme Life of the Sea takes readers to the absolute limits of the ocean world—the fastest and deepest, the hottest and oldest creatures of the oceans. It dives into the icy Arctic and boiling hydrothermal vents—and exposes the eternal darkness of the deepest undersea trenches—to show how marine life thrives against the odds. This thrilling book brings to life the sea's most extreme species, and tells their stories as characters in the drama of the oceans. Coauthored by Stephen Palumbi, one of today’s leading marine scientists, The Extreme Life of the Sea tells the unforgettable tales of some of the most marvelous life forms on Earth, and the challenges they overcome to survive. Modern science and a fluid narrative style give every reader a deep look at the lives of these species. The Extreme Life of the Sea shows you the world’s oldest living species. It describes how flying fish strain to escape their predators, how predatory deep-sea fish use red searchlights only they can see to find and attack food, and how, at the end of her life, a mother octopus dedicates herself to raising her batch of young. This wide-ranging and highly accessible book also shows how ocean adaptations can inspire innovative commercial products—such as fan blades modeled on the flippers of humpback whales—and how future extremes created by human changes to the oceans might push some of these amazing species over the edge. An enhanced edition is also available and includes eleven videos.
Posted in Science

Whale-watching

Sustainable Tourism and Ecological Management

Author: James Higham,Lars Bejder,Rob Williams

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521195977

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 401

View: 2986

A critical insight into the diverse socio-cultural, political, economic and ecological contexts of the global whale-watching industry.
Posted in Business & Economics

Marine Mammals Ashore

A Field Guide for Strandings

Author: Joseph R. Geraci,Valerie J. Lounsbury

Publisher: National Aquarium in Baltimore

ISBN: 0977460908

Category: Marine mammals

Page: 371

View: 3918

Marine Mammals Ashore: A Field Guide for Strandings (J.R. Geraci & V.J. Lounsbury)in the hardcover formatis back! A comprehensive manual for understanding and dealing with a stranded seal, manatee, dolphin, whale, or sea otter, this book contains information for the interested beach dweller or student and for the scientist or marine resource manager. Marine Mammals Ashore describes rescue operations, how to organize a response team, and how to deal with the media and the public. It includes basic information on marine mammal biology, life history, and health, and an extensive bibliography.Marine Mammals Ashore also provides stranding network participants with practical guidelines for collecting data and specimens to better understand the biology and behavior of marine animals and the condition of their environment.All chapters have been updated and expanded, with emphasis on topics that include: enhancing network organization, public education, and media relations. natural and human-related mortality in each major marine mammal group. recognizing, responding to, and investigating unusual mortality events. new or updated protocols for specimen and data collection (e.g., samples for PCR analysis; basic guidelines for investigating possible noise-related strandings; collecting environmental data and samples; and a detailed protocol for examining marine mammals for signs of human interactions). zoonoses and other public health issues. updated overview of marine mammal stranding frequency and distribution in North America, with coverage extended to Canada and Mexico. overview of special topics provided by invited authors: disentanglement (Peter Howorth, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center, Santa Barbara CA); tagging and monitoring (Anthony Martin, British Antarctic Survey); and GIS applications (Greg Early, A.I.S., Inc., New Bedford, MA). close to 600 new references (and a few new carcass disposal stories!).The 372-page second edition features water- and tear-resistant paper, a vinyl cover, and durable plastic coil binding. There are even strategically placed lined pages for adding personal notes and contact information.
Posted in Marine mammals

Hawaii's Kolea

The Amazing Transpacific Life of the Pacific Golden-Plover

Author: Oscar W. Johnson,Susan Scott

Publisher: Latitude 20

ISBN: 9780824866969

Category: Nature

Page: 80

View: 7944

Oscar "Wally" Johnson, the undisputed world expert on Pacific Golden-Plovers, and Susan Scott, a popular-science writer, have combined their knowledge and enthusiasm to create a book for everyone who admires the exceptional birds known as Kolea in Hawaiian. With easy-to-understand, yet scientifically accurate, text and outstanding color photographs, Hawaii's Kolea: The Amazing Transpacific Life of the Pacific Golden-Plover is a handy, reliable source of information for both general readers and ornithology specialists. Although the Pacific Golden-Plover is a member of the shorebird group, Kolea spend most of their time inland, favoring open space with short vegetation. This makes Hawaii's cemeteries, golf courses, and backyard lawns prime real estate for these migratory birds, which have adapted remarkably well to life among humans. Each year Kolea fly thousands of miles nonstop from Alaska and return to the same spot in the Islands, whether a condominium courtyard, a busy beach park, or strip of grass in downtown Honolulu. As a result, many Hawai'i residents get to know individual birds, calling them "my Kolea." In turn, urban plovers often grow tame around people, an endearing trait uncommon in other birds. Their human admirers see city Kolea as charming, alert, and personable-qualities that, together with their grace and beauty, have made them arguably Hawai'i's favorite bird. Observing the birds gives rise to countless questions: "When do the birds leave Hawai'i? When do they return? Do they have chicks in the Islands? How long does it take them to fly to Alaska?" To answer these and other questions, the authors have gathered together just about every detail researchers know about Pacific Golden-Plovers. If you marvel at the remarkable birds that prance through your park, strut in your street, and rest on your rooftop, this book will make you love Kolea even more.
Posted in Nature

Fluke

Or, I Know Why the Winged Whale Sings

Author: Christopher Moore

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061807688

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 1460

Just why do humpback whales sing? That's the question that has marine behavioral biologist Nate Quinn and his crew poking, charting, recording, and photographing very big, wet, gray marine mammals. Until the extraordinary day when a whale lifts its tail into the air to display a cryptic message spelled out in foot-high letters: Bite me. Trouble is, Nate's beginning to wonder if he hasn't spent just a little too much time in the sun. 'Cause no one else on his team saw a thing -- not his longtime partner, Clay Demodocus; not their saucy young research assistant; not even the spliff-puffing white-boy Rastaman Kona (né Preston Applebaum). But later, when a roll of film returns from the lab missing the crucial tail shot -- and his research facility is trashed -- Nate realizes something very fishy indeed is going on. By turns witty, irreverent, fascinating, puzzling, and surprising, Fluke is Christopher Moore at his outrageous best.
Posted in Fiction