Immigration Policy In The Federal Republic Of Germany

Negotiating Membership and Remaking the Nation

Author: Douglas B. Klusmeyer,Demetrios G. Papademetriou

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857456261

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 1024

German migration policy now stands at a major crossroad, caught between a fifty-year history of missed opportunities and serious new challenges. Focusing on these new challenges that German policy makers face, the authors, both internationally recognized in this field, use historical argument, theoretical analysis, and empirical evaluation to advance a more nuanced understanding of recent initiatives and the implications of these initiatives. Their approach combines both synthesis and original research in a presentation that is not only accessible to the general educated reader but also addresses the concerns of academic scholars and policy analysts. This important volume offers a comprehensive and critical examination of the history of German migration law and policy from the Federal Republic’s inception in 1949 to the present.
Posted in Social Science

Migration Past, Migration Future

Germany and the United States

Author: Klaus J. Bade

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571814074

Category: Political Science

Page: 176

View: 1237

The United States is an immigrant country. Germany is not. This volume shatters this widely held myth and reveals the remarkable similarities (as well as the differences) between the two countries. Essays by leading German and American historians and demographers describe how these two countries have become to have the largest number of immigrants among advanced industrial countries, how their conceptions of citizenship and nationality differ, and how their ethnic compositions are likely to be transformed in the next century as a consequence ofmigration, fertility trends, citizenship and naturalization laws, and public attitudes.
Posted in Political Science

American Immigration and Ethnicity

A Reader

Author: D. Gerber,A. Kraut

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137086157

Category: History

Page: 345

View: 4645

This work aims to enrich studies of American immigration history by combining and comparing the experiences of both European immigration, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and Asian, Hispanic, Caribbean, and African immigrations in the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
Posted in History

Challenging Ethnic Citizenship

German and Israeli Perspectives on Immigration

Author: Daniel Levy,Yfaat Weiss

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571812919

Category: Political Science

Page: 282

View: 6786

Includes statistics.
Posted in Political Science

The History and Immigration of Asian Americans

Author: Franklin Ng

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780815326908

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 2109

This volume traces the modern critical and performance history of this play, one of Shakespeare's most-loved and most-performed comedies. The essay focus on such modern concerns as feminism, deconstruction, textual theory, and queer theory.
Posted in History

Migration, Memory, and Diversity

Germany from 1945 to the Present

Author: Cornelia Wilhelm

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785333283

Category: Social Science

Page: 366

View: 1720

Within Germany, policies and cultural attitudes toward migrants have been profoundly shaped by the difficult legacies of the Second World War and its aftermath. This wide-ranging volume explores the complex history of migration and diversity in Germany from 1945 to today, showing how conceptions of "otherness" developed while memories of the Nazi era were still fresh, and identifying the continuities and transformations they exhibited through the Cold War and reunification. It provides invaluable context for understanding contemporary Germany's unique role within regional politics at a time when an unprecedented influx of immigrants and refugees present the European community with a significant challenge.
Posted in Social Science

The INS on the Line

Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954

Author: S. Deborah Kang

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199757437

Category:

Page: 296

View: 3311

"For much of the twentieth century, Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) officials recognized that the US-Mexico border region was a special case. Here, the INS confronted a set of political, social, and environmental obstacles that prevented it from replicating its achievements at the immigration stations of Angel Island and Ellis Island. In response to these challenges, local INS officials resorted to the law--amending, nullifying, and even rewriting the nation's immigration laws for the borderlands, as well as enforcing them. In The INS on the Line, S. Deborah Kang traces the ways in which the INS on the US-Mexico border made the nation's immigration laws over the course of the twentieth century. While the INS is primarily thought to be a law enforcement agency, Kang demonstrates that the agency also defined itself as a lawmaking body. Through a nuanced examination of the agency's admission, deportation, and enforcement practices in the Southwest, she reveals how local immigration officials constructed a complex approach to border control, one that closed the line in the name of nativism and national security, opened it for the benefit of transnational economic and social concerns, and redefined it as a vast legal jurisdiction for the policing of undocumented immigrants. Despite its contingent and local origins, this composite approach to border control, Kang concludes, continues to inform the daily operations of the nation's immigration agencies, American immigration law and policy, and conceptions of this border today"--
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United States History

A Multicultural, Interdisciplinary Guide to Information Sources

Author: Anna H. Perrault,Ron Blazek

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited

ISBN: 9781563088742

Category: History

Page: 661

View: 4391

This important work has been completely revised and expanded with the addition of online databases, Web sites and CD-ROM titles. It identifies and describes hundreds of reference books that pertain to American history; entries offer thorough annotations that are both descriptive and evaluative. Arranged topically, chapters cover U.S. history in terms of politics and government; diplomatic history and foreign affairs; military history; social, cultural, and intellectual history; regional history; and economic history. Introductory scope notes provide valuable expository information and suggested search strategies in such areas as automation, government documents, and genealogy. Includes works published through 2002.
Posted in History

Daily Life in Immigrant America, 1820-1870

Author: James M. Bergquist

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313336980

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 4424

Examines the experiences of immigrants in the United States during the nineteenth century, discussing such topics as the journey to America, life in immigrant communities, and the struggle to gain acceptance by mainstream culture.
Posted in History

City of Dreams

The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York

Author: Tyler Anbinder

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544103858

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 7567

"Told brilliantly, even unforgettably ... An American story, one that belongs to all of us." — Boston Globe “A richly textured guide to the history of our immigrant nation’s pinnacle immigrant city has managed to enter the stage during an election season that has resurrected this historically fraught topic in all its fierceness.” — New York Times Book Review New York has been America’s city of immigrants for nearly four centuries. Growing from Peter Minuit’s tiny settlement of 1626 to a clamorous metropolis with more than three million immigrants today, the city has always been a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. City of Dreams is the long-overdue, inspiring, and defining account of New York’s immigrants, both famous and forgotten: the young man from the Caribbean who relocated to New York and became a founding father; Russian-born Emma Goldman, who condoned the murder of American industrialists as a means of aiding downtrodden workers; Dominican immigrant Oscar de la Renta, who dressed first ladies from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama. Over ten years in the making, Tyler Anbinder’s story is one of innovators and artists, revolutionaries and rioters, staggering deprivation and soaring triumphs. In so many ways, today’s immigrants are just like those who came to America in centuries past—and their stories have never before been told with such breadth of scope, lavish research, and resounding spirit. “A masterful achievement, City of Dreams is the definitive account of the American origin story, as told through our premier metropolis. Bold, exhaustive, always surprising, Anbinder’s book is a wonderful reminder of how we came to be who we are.” — Timothy Egan, best-selling author of The Immortal Irishman
Posted in History

German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era

Author: Alison Clark Efford

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107031931

Category: History

Page: 267

View: 4740

This study reframes Civil War-era history, arguing that the Franco-Prussian War contributed to a dramatic pivot in Northern commitment to African-American rights.
Posted in History

Paths to Inclusion

The Integration of Migrants in the United States and Germany

Author: Peter H. Schuck,Rainer Münz

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571810922

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 4084

When discussing wages, historians have traditionally concentrated on the level of wages, much less on how people were paid for their work. Important aspects were thus ignored such as how frequently were wages actually paid, how much of the wage was paid in non-monetary form - whether as traditional perquisites or community relief - especially when there was often insufficient coinage available to pay wages. Covering a wide geographical area, ranging from Spain to Finland, and time span, ranging from the sixteenth century to the 1930s, this volume offers fresh perspectives on key areas in social and economic history such as the relationship between customs, moral economy, wages and the market, changing pay and wage forms and the relationship between age, gender and wages.
Posted in Social Science

Not Just Black and White

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Immgiration, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States

Author: Nancy Foner,George M. Fredrickson

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 1610442113

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 9468

Immigration is one of the driving forces behind social change in the United States, continually reshaping the way Americans think about race and ethnicity. How have various racial and ethnic groups—including immigrants from around the globe, indigenous racial minorities, and African Americans—related to each other both historically and today? How have these groups been formed and transformed in the context of the continuous influx of new arrivals to this country? In Not Just Black and White, editors Nancy Foner and George M. Fredrickson bring together a distinguished group of social scientists and historians to consider the relationship between immigration and the ways in which concepts of race and ethnicity have evolved in the United States from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Not Just Black and White opens with an examination of historical and theoretical perspectives on race and ethnicity. The late John Higham, in the last scholarly contribution of his distinguished career, defines ethnicity broadly as a sense of community based on shared historical memories, using this concept to shed new light on the main contours of American history. The volume also considers the shifting role of state policy with regard to the construction of race and ethnicity. Former U.S. census director Kenneth Prewitt provides a definitive account of how racial and ethnic classifications in the census developed over time and how they operate today. Other contributors address the concept of panethnicity in relation to whites, Latinos, and Asian Americans, and explore socioeconomic trends that have affected, and continue to affect, the development of ethno-racial identities and relations. Joel Perlmann and Mary Waters offer a revealing comparison of patterns of intermarriage among ethnic groups in the early twentieth century and those today. The book concludes with a look at the nature of intergroup relations, both past and present, with special emphasis on how America's principal non-immigrant minority—African Americans—fits into this mosaic. With its attention to contemporary and historical scholarship, Not Just Black and White provides a wealth of new insights about immigration, race, and ethnicity that are fundamental to our understanding of how American society has developed thus far, and what it may look like in the future.
Posted in Social Science

Expelling the Poor

Atlantic Seaboard States and the Nineteenth-Century Origins of American Immigration Policy

Author: Hidetaka Hirota,Visiting Assistant Professor of History Hidetaka Hirota

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019061921X

Category:

Page: 312

View: 6413

Expelling the Poor examines the origins of immigration restriction in the United States, especially deportation policy. Based on an analysis of immigration policies in major American coastal states, including New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Louisiana, and California, itprovides the first sustained study of immigration control conducted by states prior to the introduction of federal immigration law in the late nineteenth century. The influx of impoverished Irish immigrants over the first half of the nineteenth century led nativists in New York and Massachusetts todevelop policies for prohibiting the landing of destitute foreigners and deporting those already resident in the states to Europe, Canada, or other American states. No other coastal state engaged in immigration regulation with the same level of legislative effort and success as the two states. By locating the roots of American immigration control in cultural prejudice against the Irish and, more essentially, economic concerns about their poverty in nineteenth-century New York and Massachusetts, this book fundamentally revises the history of American immigration policy, which has largelyfocused on anti-Asian racism on the West Coast. By investigating state officials' practices of illegal removal, such as the overseas deportation of those who held American citizenship, this book reveals how the state-level treatment of destitute immigrants set precedents for the assertion byAmerican officers of unrestricted power against undesirable aliens, which characterized later federal control. Beginning with Irish migrants' initial departure from Ireland, the book traces their transatlantic passage to North America, the process of their expulsion from the United States, and theirpost-deportation lives in Europe. In doing so, it places American nativism in a transnational context, demonstrating how American deportation policy operated as part of a broader legal culture of excluding non-producing members from societies in the north Atlantic world.
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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0691176213

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5583

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The Germans of Charleston, Richmond and New Orleans during the Civil War Period, 1850-1870

A Study and Research Compendium

Author: Andrea Mehrländer

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110236893

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 3191

Dieser Titel ist die erste Monographie zur Rolle der deutschen Bevölkerungsminderheit in den Südstaaten im Amerikanischen Bürgerkrieg. Sie stellt heraus, dass die Deutschen durchaus an den Kämpfen beteiligt waren und der Sklaverei weitgehend positiv gegenüber standen. In einer vergleichenden Analyse werden die deutschen Milizen, Wortführer, Konsuln, Blockadebrecher und Unternehmer der Städte Charleston, Richmond und New Orleans vorgestellt. Der Anhang enthält eine umfangreiche Übersicht zu Primär- und Sekundärquellen, u. a. ein tabellarisches Verzeichnis über die Angehörigen der ethnisch-deutschen Militäreinheiten mit Namen, Herkunft, Rang, Beruf, Einkommen und Sklavenbesitz. Das Werk eignet sich als Archivführer für weitere einschlägige Arbeiten durch Historiker, Militärforscher und Genealogen.
Posted in History

Ambivalent Embrace

Jewish Upward Mobility in Postwar America

Author: Rachel Kranson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469635445

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 5986

This new cultural history of Jewish life and identity in the United States after World War II focuses on the process of upward mobility. Rachel Kranson challenges the common notion that most American Jews unambivalently celebrated their generally strong growth in economic status and social acceptance during the booming postwar era. In fact, a significant number of Jewish religious, artistic, and intellectual leaders worried about the ascent of large numbers of Jews into the American middle class. Kranson reveals that many Jews were deeply concerned that their lives—affected by rapidly changing political pressures, gender roles, and religious practices—were becoming dangerously disconnected from authentic Jewish values. She uncovers how Jewish leaders delivered jeremiads that warned affluent Jews of hypocrisy and associated "good" Jews with poverty, even at times romanticizing life in America's immigrant slums and Europe's impoverished shtetls. Jewish leaders, while not trying to hinder economic development, thus cemented an ongoing identification with the Jewish heritage of poverty and marginality as a crucial element in an American Jewish ethos.
Posted in Social Science