The History of the University of Oxford: Volume VIII: The Twentieth Century

Author: T H Aston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198229742

Category: Education

Page: 936

View: 9874

This is the first study of how one of the world's major universities has responded to the formidable challenges offered by the twentieth century. It is a generously illustrated and scholarly book which contributes significantly to the history of ideas and culture in twentieth-century Britain. It presents the reader with a rich cornucopia of insight into many aspects of British life and a valuable assessment of Oxford's influence in the world sphere. Contributors: Paul Addison, Giles Barber, Michael Brock, Valentine Cunningham, Robert Currie, J.G. Darwin, R.A. Denniston, J.P.D. Dunbabin, Daniel I. Greenstein, A.H. Halsey, Jose Harris, Brian Harrison, Janet Howarth, Diane Kay, J.B. Morrell, John Prest, John Roche, Keith Thomas, F.M. Turner, Charles Webster, D.J. Wenden, Christopher White, Richard Whiting, J.M. Winter
Posted in Education

Strange Blooms

The Curious Lives and Adventures of the John Tradescants

Author: Jennifer Potter

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN: 1782395466

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 4664

In seventeenth-century Britain, a new breed of 'curious' gardeners were pushing at the frontiers of knowledge and new plants were stealing into Europe from East and West. John Tradescant and his son were at the vanguard of this change - as gardeners, as collectors and above all as exemplars of an age that began in wonder and ended with the dawning of science. Jennifer Potter's book vividly evokes the drama of their lives and takes its readers to the edge of an expanding universe. Strange Blooms is a magnificent pleasure for gardeners and non-gardeners alike.
Posted in History

Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century, Volume I

Morals, Politics, Art, Religion

Author: Aaron Garrett,James A. Harris

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191043435

Category: Philosophy

Page: 448

View: 731

A History of Scottish Philosophy is a series of collaborative studies by expert authors, each volume being devoted to a specific period. Together they provide a comprehensive account of the Scottish philosophical tradition, from the centuries that laid the foundation of the remarkable burst of intellectual fertility known as the Scottish Enlightenment, through the Victorian age and beyond, when it continued to exercise powerful intellectual influence at home and abroad. The books aim to be historically informative, while at the same time serving to renew philosophical interest in the problems with which the Scottish philosophers grappled, and in the solutions they proposed. This new history of Scottish philosophy will include two volumes that focus on the Scottish Enlightenment. In this volume a team of leading experts explore the ideas, intellectual context, and influence of Hutcheson, Hume, Smith, Reid, and many other thinkers, frame old issues in fresh ways, and introduce new topics and questions into debates about the philosophy of this remarkable period. The contributors explore the distinctively Scottish context of this philosophical flourishing, and juxtapose the work of canonical philosophers with contemporaries now very seldom read. The outcome is a broadening-out, and a filling-in of the detail, of the picture of the philosophical scene of Scotland in the eighteenth century. General Editor: Gordon Graham, Princeton Theological Seminary
Posted in Philosophy

Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: The Oxford History of Western Music

Author: Richard Taruskin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199796033

Category: Music

Page: 832

View: 2923

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present. Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to a significant period in the history of Western music. Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries , the second volume Richard Taruskin's monumental history, illuminates the explosion of musical creativity that occurred in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Examining a wealth of topics, Taruskin looks at the elegant masques and consort music of Jacobean England, the Italian concerto style of Corelli and Vivaldi, and the progression from Baroque to Rococo to romantic style. Perhaps most important, he offers a fascinating account of the giants of this period: Bach, Handel, Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven. Laced with brilliant observations, memorable musical analysis, and a panoramic sense of the interactions between history, culture, politics, art, literature, religion, and music, this book will be essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand this rich and diverse period.
Posted in Music

The History of British Women's Writing, 1610-1690

Volume Three

Author: M. Suzuki

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230305504

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 339

View: 4234

During the seventeenth century, in response to political and social upheavals such as the English Civil Wars, women produced writings in both manuscript and print. This volume represents recent scholarship that has uncovered new texts as well as introduced new paradigms to further our understanding of women's literary history during this period.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Common Law in Colonial America

Volume I: The Chesapeake and New England 1607-1660

Author: William E. Nelson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199886857

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 1645

Drawing on groundbreaking and overwhelmingly extensive research into local court records, The Common Law in Colonial America proposes a "new beginning" in the study of colonial legal history, as it charts the course of the common law in Early America, to reveal how the models of law that emerged differed drastically from that of the English common law. In this first volume, Nelson explores how the law of the Chesapeake colonies--Virginia and Maryland--differed from the New England colonies--Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut, New Haven, Plymouth, and Rhode Island--and looks at the differences between the colonial legal systems within the two regions, from their initial settlement until approximately 1660.
Posted in History

Encyclopedia of African History 3-Volume Set

Author: Kevin Shillington

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135456690

Category: History

Page: 1912

View: 2347

Covering the entire continent from Morocco, Libya, and Egypt in the north to the Cape of Good Hope in the south, and the surrounding islands from Cape Verde in the west to Madagascar, Mauritius, and Seychelles in the east, the Encyclopedia of African History is a new A-Z reference resource on the history of the entire African continent. With entries ranging from the earliest evolution of human beings in Africa to the beginning of the twenty-first century, this comprehensive three volume Encyclopedia is the first reference of this scale and scope. Also includes 99 maps.
Posted in History

Oxford History of Western Music: 5-vol. set

Author: Richard Taruskin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199813698

Category: Music

Page: 3856

View: 7906

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music by one of the most prominent and provocative musicologists of our time, Richard Taruskin. Now in paperback, the set has been reconstructed to be available for the first time as individual books, each one taking on a critical time period in the history of western music. All five books are also being offered in a shrink wrapped set for a discounted price. Each book in this magnificent set illuminates - through a representative sampling of masterworks - those themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to each musical age. The five titles cover Western music from its earliest days to the sixteenth century, the seventeenth and eighteenth century, the nineteenth century, the early twentieth century, and the late twentieth century. Taking a critical perspective, Taruskin sets the details of music, the chronological sweep of figures, works, and musical ideas, within the larger context of world affairs and cultural history. He combines an emphasis on structure and form with a discussion of relevant theoretical concepts in each age, to illustrate how the music itself works, and how contemporaries heard and understood it. He also describes how the context of each stylistic period - key cultural, historical, social, economic, and scientific events - influenced and directed compositional choices. Moreover, the five books are filled with helpful illustrations that enhance the historical context of musical composition, as well as musical examples, black-and-white pictures throughout, suggestions for further reading, and indexes. Laced with brilliant observations, memorable musical analysis, and a panoramic sense of the interactions between history, culture, politics, art, literature, religion, and music, these books will be essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand this rich and diverse tradition.
Posted in Music

Empire of Extinction

Russians and the North Pacific's Strange Beasts of the Sea, 1741-1867

Author: Ryan Tucker Jones

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199373809

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 698

In the second half of the eighteenth century, the Russian Empire-already the largest on earth-expanded its dominion onto the ocean. Through a series of government-sponsored voyages of discovery and the establishment of a private fur trade, Russians crossed and re-crossed the Bering Strait and the North Pacific Ocean, establishing colonies in Kamchatka and Alaska and exporting marine mammal furs to Europe and China. In the process they radically transformed the North Pacific, causing environmental catastrophe. In one of the most hotly-contested imperial arenas of the day, the Russian empire organized a host of Siberian and Alaskan native peoples to rapaciously hunt for fur seals, sea otters, and other fur-bearing animals. The animals declined precipitously, and Steller's sea cow went extinct. This destruction captured the attention of natural historians who for the first time began to recognize the threat of species extinction. These experts drew upon Enlightenment and Romantic-era ideas about nature and imperialism but their ideas were refracted through Russian scientific culture and influenced by the region's unique ecology. Cosmopolitan scientific networks ensured the spread of their ideas throughout Europe. Heeding the advice of these scientific experts, Russian colonial governors began long-term management of marine mammal stocks and instituted some of the colonial world's most forward-thinking conservationist policies. Highlighting the importance of the North Pacific in Russian imperial and global environmental history, Empire of Extinction focuses on the development of ideas about the natural world in a crucial location far from what has been considered the center of progressive environmental attitudes.
Posted in History

Millenarianism and Messianism in Early Modern European Culture

Volume I: Jewish Messianism in the Early Modern World

Author: M. Goldish,R.H. Popkin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401722781

Category: Philosophy

Page: 246

View: 6099

The earliest scientific studies of Jewish messianism were conducted by the scholars of the Wissenschaft des Judentums school, particularly Heinrich Graetz, the first great Jewish historian of the Jews since Josephus. These researches were invaluable because they utilized primary sources in print and manuscript which had been previously unknown or used only in polemics. The Wissenschaft studies themselves, however, prove to be polemics as well on closer inspection. Among the goals of this group was to demonstrate that Judaism is a rational and logical faith whose legitimacy and historical progress deserve recognition by the nations of Europe. Mystical and messianic beliefs which might undermine this image were presented as aberrations or the result of corrosive foreign influences on the Jews. Gershom Scholem took upon himself the task of returning mysticism and messianism to their rightful central place in the panorama of Jewish thought. Jewish messianism was, for Scholem, a central theme in the philosophy and life of the Jews throughout their history, shaped anew by each generation to fit its specific hopes and needs. Scholem emphasized that this phenomenon was essentially independent of messianic or millenarian trends among other peoples. For example, in discussing messianism in the early modern era Scholem describes a trunk of influence on the Jewish psyche set off by the expulsion from Spain in 1492.
Posted in Philosophy

A Blessed Company

Parishes, Parsons, and Parishioners in Anglican Virginia, 1690-1776

Author: John K. Nelson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875104

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 6268

In this book, John Nelson reconstructs everyday Anglican religious practice and experience in Virginia from the end of the seventeenth century to the start of the American Revolution. Challenging previous characterizations of the colonial Anglican establishment as weak, he reveals the fundamental role the church played in the political, social, and economic as well as the spiritual lives of its parishioners. Drawing on extensive research in parish and county records and other primary sources, Nelson describes Anglican Virginia's parish system, its parsons, its rituals of worship and rites of passage, and its parishioners' varied relationships to the church. All colonial Virginians--men and women, rich and poor, young and old, planters and merchants, servants and slaves, dissenters and freethinkers--belonged to a parish. As such, they were subject to its levies, its authority over marriage, and other social and economic dictates. In addition to its religious functions, the parish provided essential care for the poor, collaborated with the courts to handle civil disputes, and exerted its influence over many other aspects of community life. A Blessed Company demonstrates that, by creatively adapting Anglican parish organization and the language, forms, and modes of Anglican spirituality to the Chesapeake's distinctive environmental and human conditions, colonial Virginians sustained a remarkably effective and faithful Anglican church in the Old Dominion.
Posted in History

Women of Letters, Manuscript Circulation, and Print Afterlives in the Eighteenth Century

Elizabeth Rowe, Catharine Cockburn and Elizabeth Carter

Author: M. Bigold

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137033576

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 291

View: 3799

Using unpublished manuscript writings, this book reinterprets material, social, literary, philosophical and religious contexts of women's letter-writing in the long 18th century. It shows how letter-writing functions as a form of literary manuscript exchange and argues for manuscript circulation as a method of engaging with the republic of letters.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Temporality of Taste in Eighteenth-Century British Writing

Author: James Noggle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199642435

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 9813

This book discusses the disruptive power of the concept of taste in the works of a number of important British writers, including poets such as Alexander Pope and Joseph Warton, philosophical historians such as David Hume and Anna Barbauld, and novelists such as Frances Burney and William Beckford.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Income Tax in Common Law Jurisdictions: Volume 1, From the Origins to 1820

Author: Peter Harris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139461206

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 2536

This book was first published in 2006. Many common law countries inherited British income tax rules. Whether the inheritance was direct or indirect, the rationale and origins of some of the central rules seem almost lost in history. Commonly, they are simply explained as being of British origin without more, but even in Britain the origins of some of these rules are less than clear. This book traces the roots of the income tax and its precursors in Britain and in its former colonies to 1820. Harris focuses on four issues that are central to common law income taxes and which are of particular current relevance: the capital/revenue distinction, the taxation of corporations, taxation on both a source and residence basis, and the schedular approach to taxation. He uses an historical perspective to make observations about the future direction of income tax in the modern world.
Posted in Law

Absolute Music

The History of an Idea

Author: Mark Evan Bonds

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019938472X

Category: Music

Page: 400

View: 3080

What is music, and why does it move us? From Pythagoras to the present, writers have struggled to isolate the essence of "pure" or "absolute" music in ways that also account for its profound effect. In Absolute Music: The History of an Idea, Mark Evan Bonds traces the history of these efforts across more than two millennia, paying special attention to the relationship between music's essence and its qualities of form, expression, beauty, autonomy, as well as its perceived capacity to disclose philosophical truths. The core of this book focuses on the period between 1850 and 1945. Although the idea of pure music is as old as antiquity, the term "absolute music" is itself relatively recent. It was Richard Wagner who coined the term, in 1846, and he used it as a pejorative in his efforts to expose the limitations of purely instrumental music. For Wagner, music that was "absolute" was isolated, detached from the world, sterile. His contemporary, the Viennese critic Eduard Hanslick, embraced this quality of isolation as a guarantor of purity. Only pure, absolute music, he argued, could realize the highest potential of the art. Bonds reveals how and why perceptions of absolute music changed so radically between the 1850s and 1920s. When it first appeared, "absolute music" was a new term applied to old music, but by the early decades of the twentieth century, it had become-paradoxically--an old term associated with the new music of modernists like Schoenberg and Stravinsky. Bonds argues that the key developments in this shift lay not in discourse about music but rather the visual arts. The growing prestige of abstraction and form in painting at the turn of the twentieth century-line and color, as opposed to object-helped move the idea of purely abstract, absolute music to the cutting edge of musical modernism. By carefully tracing the evolution of absolute music from Ancient Greece through the Middle Ages to the twentieth-century, Bonds not only provides the first comprehensive history of this pivotal concept but also provokes new thoughts on the essence of music and how essence has been used to explain music's effect. A long awaited book from one of the most respected senior scholars in the field, Absolute Music will be essential reading for anyone interested in the history, theory, and aesthetics of music.
Posted in Music

A History of Preaching

Author: O.C. Edwards, Jr.

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1426725620

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 1367

A History of Preachingbrings together narrative history and primary sources to provide the most comprehensive guide available to the story of the church's ministry of proclamation. Bringing together an impressive array of familiar and lesser-known figures, Edwards paints a detailed, compelling picture of what it has meant to preach the gospel. Pastors, scholars, and students of homiletics will find here many opportunities to enrich their understanding and practice of preaching. Volume 1, appearing in the print edition, contains Edwards's magisterial retelling of the story of Christian preaching's development from its Hellenistic and Jewish roots in the New Testament, through the late-twentieth century's discontent with outdated forms and emphasis on new modes of preaching such as narrative. Along the way the author introduces us to the complexities and contributions of preachers, both with whom we are already acquainted, and to whom we will be introduced here for the first time. Origen, Chrysostom, Augustine, Bernard, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Wesley, Edwards, Rauschenbusch, Barth; all of their distinctive contributions receive careful attention. Yet lesser-known figures and developments also appear, from the ninth-century reform of preaching championed by Hrabanus Maurus, to the reference books developed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries by the mendicant orders to assist their members' preaching, to Howell Harris and Daniel Rowlands, preachers of the eighteenth-century Welsh revival, to Helen Kenyon, speaking as a layperson at the 1950 Yale Beecher lectures about the view of preaching from the pew. Volume 2, contained on the enclosed CD-ROM, contains primary source material on preaching drawn from the entire scope of the church's twenty centuries. The author has written an introduction to each selection, placing it in its historical context and pointing to its particular contribution. Each chapter in Volume 2 is geared to its companion chapter in Volume 1's narrative history. Ecumenical in scope, fair-minded in presentation, appreciative of the contributions that all the branches of the church have made to the story of what it means to develop, deliver, and listen to a sermon, A History of Preachingwill be the definitive resource for anyone who wishes to preach or to understand preaching's role in living out the gospel. "...'This work is expected to be the standard text on preaching for the next 30 years,' says Ann K. Riggs, who staffs the NCC's Faith and Order Commission. Author Edwards, former professor of preaching at Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, is co-moderator of the commission, which studies church-uniting and church-dividing issues. 'A History of Preaching is ecumenical in scope and will be relevant in all our churches; we all participate in this field,' says Riggs...." from EcuLink, Number 65, Winter 2004-2005 published by the National Council of Churches
Posted in Religion

The Oxford History of the British Empire: The eighteenth century

Author: William Roger Louis,Alaine M. Low,Peter James Marshall

Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198205635

Category: History

Page: 639

View: 9818

Continuing Oxford's five-volume comprehensive history of the British Empire, Volume II examines the history of British expansion from the Glorious Revolution of 1689 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars, a crucial phase in the creation of the modern British Empire. 13 maps.
Posted in History

The End of Slavery in Africa and the Americas

A Comparative Approach

Author: Ulrike Schmieder,Katja Füllberg-Stolberg,Michael Zeuske

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 364310345X

Category: History

Page: 169

View: 418

For centuries, social and economic relations within the Atlantic space were dominated by slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. However, when the trade ended, slave labor in America was replaced, by other forms of coerced labor. This book focuses on the transformation of societies after the slave trade and slavery. It combines micro- and macro-historical approaches and looks at the agency of slaves, missionaries, abolitionists, state officials, seamen, and soldiers.
Posted in History

A History of Abstract Algebra

Author: Israel Kleiner

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 081764685X

Category: Mathematics

Page: 168

View: 8705

This book does nothing less than provide an account of the intellectual lineage of abstract algebra. The development of abstract algebra was propelled by the need for new tools to address certain classical problems that appeared insoluble by classical means. A major theme of the book is to show how abstract algebra has arisen in attempting to solve some of these classical problems, providing a context from which the reader may gain a deeper appreciation of the mathematics involved. Mathematics instructors, algebraists, and historians of science will find the work a valuable reference.
Posted in Mathematics