The Dawn of Human Culture

Author: Richard G. Klein

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780471449317

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 1168

A bold new theory on what sparked the "big bang" of human culture The abrupt emergence of human culture over a stunningly short period continues to be one of the great enigmas of human evolution. This compelling book introduces a bold new theory on this unsolved mystery. Author Richard Klein reexamines the archaeological evidence and brings in new discoveries in the study of the human brain. These studies detail the changes that enabled humans to think and behave in far more sophisticated ways than before, resulting in the incredibly rapid evolution of new skills. Richard Klein has been described as "the premier anthropologist in the country today" by Evolutionary Anthropology. Here, he and coauthor Blake Edgar shed new light on the full story of a truly fascinating period of evolution. Richard G. Klein, PhD (Palo Alto, CA), is a Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University. He is the author of the definitive academic book on the subject of the origins of human culture, The Human Career. Blake Edgar (San Francisco, CA) is the coauthor of the very successful From Lucy to Language, with Dr. Donald Johanson. He has written extensively for Discover, GEO, and numerous other magazines.
Posted in Social Science

The Dawn of Human Culture

Author: Richard G. Klein

Publisher: Wiley

ISBN: 9780471252528

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 586

A bold new theory on what sparked the "big bang" of human culture The abrupt emergence of human culture over a stunningly short period continues to be one of the great enigmas of human evolution. This compelling book introduces a bold new theory on this unsolved mystery. Author Richard Klein reexamines the archaeological evidence and brings in new discoveries in the study of the human brain. These studies detail the changes that enabled humans to think and behave in far more sophisticated ways than before, resulting in the incredibly rapid evolution of new skills. Richard Klein has been described as "the premier anthropologist in the country today" by Evolutionary Anthropology. Here, he and coauthor Blake Edgar shed new light on the full story of a truly fascinating period of evolution. Richard G. Klein, PhD (Palo Alto, CA), is a Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University. He is the author of the definitive academic book on the subject of the origins of human culture, The Human Career. Blake Edgar (San Francisco, CA) is the coauthor of the very successful From Lucy to Language, with Dr. Donald Johanson. He has written extensively for Discover, GEO, and numerous other magazines.
Posted in Social Science

PALE SKIN, GIANTS, AND THE GREAT TRANSITION

Author: MILTON E. BRENER

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1466970316

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 8900

This book, Milton Brener’s third on the subject of UFOs and extraterrestrials, is a giant leap. He delves into an analysis of much current scientific evidence that appears to add credence to claims of early hybridization of the human race. It is an entirely new and novel approach, but a very readable and one. It is a challenge to readers to think constructively of the new and novel. It revolves around the coalescence beginning about fifty thousand years ago of several significant and scientifically proven occurrences. One is the beginning of the pale skin tone of Europeans. Brener systematically dismantles the accepted scientific explanation for it and drives home the fact that the only other living creatures with similar skin tone are the extraterrestrials, often known to many witnesses of high credibility as Nordics. Unlike other ETs, these Nordics look like us, though some are said to be remarkably tall and, also unlike others, leave the contactees with very positive feelings. Another major occurrence, the great transition, was the relatively sudden appearance of modern behavior, including artistic genius, timekeeping, and creation of musical instruments. The book is truly a tour de force.
Posted in History

The Dawn of Symbolic Life

The Future of Human Evolution

Author: Jon Beach

Publisher: Jon Beach

ISBN: 9781439268339

Category: Fiction

Page: 140

View: 8571

Approaching evolution from a different point of view, The Dawn of Symbolic Life examines how the rise of civilization and ongoing current technological progress can be seen as an extension of biological evolution. A fascinating blend of biology, philosophy, and economics, the book outlines a formidable and compelling set of ideas that places mankind at the center of an epic evolutionary event. An event that the author believes could lead to a transformation of the world as we know it. By stepping back and analyzing such contemporary issues as environmental sustainability, space exploration, the spread of information technology, and the role of religion in modern society from the long term perspective of the entire history of life, the author reaches some remarkable conclusions concerning the significance of recent events and what they portend for the future. In a profoundly optimistic assessment, the reader is methodically guided toward a fascinating vision of the future that is both inspiring and somewhat unsettling. The author, Jon Beach is both a researcher and published author in the field of evolutionary biology and an active entrepreneur in the world of business. From this combination of viewpoints comes a unique and surprising perspective on the human condition.
Posted in Fiction

The Dawn of European Civilization

Author: V. Gordon Childe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136192735

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 1157

Originally published between 1920-70,The History of Civilization was a landmark in early twentieth century publishing. It was published at a formative time within the social sciences, and during a period of decisive historical discovery. The aim of the general editor, C.K. Ogden, was to summarize the most up to date findings and theories of historians, anthropologists, archaeologists and sociologists. This reprinted material is available as a set or in the following groupings: * Prehistory and Historical Ethnography Set of 12: 0-415-15611-4: £800.00 * Greek Civilization Set of 7: 0-415-15612-2: £450.00 * Roman Civilization Set of 6: 0-415-15613-0: £400.00 * Eastern Civilizations Set of 10: 0-415-15614-9: £650.00 * Judaeo-Christian Civilization Set of 4: 0-415-15615-7: £250.00 * European Civilization Set of 11: 0-415-15616-5: £700.00
Posted in History

The Dawn of Belief

Religion in the Upper Paleolithic of Southwestern Europe

Author: D. Bruce Dickson

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816513369

Category: Social Science

Page: 259

View: 7803

Hunter-gatherers of the Upper Paleolithic period of the late Pleistocene epoch in western Europe left a legacy of cave paintings and material remains that have long fascinated modern man. This book draws on theories derived from cultural anthropology and cognitive archaeology to propose a reconstruction of the religious life of those people based on the patterning and provenience of their artifacts. Based on the premises that all members of Homo sapiens sapiens share basically similar psychological processes and capabilities and that human culture is patterned, the author uses ethnographic analogy, inference from material patterns, and formal analysis to find in prehistoric imagery clues to the cosmology that lay behind them. The resulting book is an intriguing speculation on the nature of paleolithic religion, offering scholars a valuable synthesis of anthropological, archaeological, and sociological research, and general readers an accessible account of how our forebears may have regarded the unknown. "A well-written and intellectually rigorous introduction. If you are curious about prehistory, you will enjoy it." —Wilson Library Bulletin "Most interesting to those scholars interested in seeking materialist foundations or ecological explanations for religious practices." —American Antiquity "A well-written and concise account of what has recently been achieved by the investigations of spiritual life of the Earth's most ancient human communities." —Archiv Orientalni (Czechoslovakia)
Posted in Social Science

The Age of Conversation

Author: Gavin Heaton,Drew McLellan

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1847992994

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 116

View: 1710

"In what began as a half dare, the editors ... challenged bloggers around the world to contribute one page--400 words--on the topic of 'conversation.' The resulting book, The age of conversation, brings together over 100 of the world's leading marketers, writers, thinkers, and creative innovators"--P. [4] of cover.
Posted in Business & Economics

Big History

Die Geschichte der Welt - Vom Urknall bis zur Zukunft der Menschheit

Author: David Christian

Publisher: Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH Co KG

ISBN: 3446261427

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1984

Der Big Bang war der heißeste Augenblick der Weltgeschichte. Der Rest ist Abkühlung. Und die hatte Folgen: Atome und Sterne entstanden, die Erde und wir. Eingebettet in die Geschichte des Universums ist auch die Geschichte der Menschheit. David Christian erzählt die Historie der Welt anhand von acht Schwellenmomenten: von der Entstehung des Lebens bis zur Fotosynthese, von der Sprache bis zum menschgemachten Klimawandel. Sein Buch ist eine brillante Synthese der Erkenntnisse aus Astronomie, Biologie, Chemie und Physik. Und eine atemberaubende moderne Ursprungsgeschichte, die mit einem Ausblick auf die Zukunft endet, in der wir endlich die Verantwortung für den Planeten Erde übernehmen müssen.
Posted in History

Wired for Culture

The Natural History of Human Cooperation

Author: Mark Pagel

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 1846145759

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 6948

'Expresses an infectious sense of wonder at the uniqueness of our species; it is hard not to be affected by his enthusiasm' Sunday Times What explains the staggering diversity of cultures in the world? Why are there so many languages, even within small areas? Why do we rejoice in rituals and wrap ourselves in flags? In Wired for Culture Mark Pagel, the world's leading expert on human development, reveals how our facility for culture is the key to what makes us who we are. Shedding light on everything from art, morality and affection to jealousy, self-interest and prejudice, Pagel shows that we developed culture - cooperating together and passing on knowledge - in order to survive. Our minds are hardwired for culture, and it still determines how we speak, who we love, why we kill and what we think today. 'Human evolution may be the hottest area in popular science writing. Within this field, Wired for Culture stands out for both its sweeping erudition and its accessibility ... richly rewarding' Financial Times 'Impressive for its detail, accuracy and vivacity' Guardian 'Pioneering, vivid ... the best popular science book on culture so far' Nature
Posted in Social Science

Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 364110498X

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 3407

Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.
Posted in History

The "God" Part of the Brain

A Scientific Interpretation of Human Spirituality and God

Author: Matthew Alper

Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.

ISBN: 1402236379

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 5390

Is Man the product of a God...or is "God" the product of human evolution? From the dawn of our species, every human culture-no matter how isolated-has believed in some form of a spiritual realm. According to author Matthew Alper, this is no mere coincidence but rather due to the fact that humans, as a species, are genetically predisposed to believe in the universal concepts of a god, a soul and an afterlife. This instinct to believe is the result of an evolutionary adaptation-a coping mechanism-that emerged in our species to help us survive our unique and otherwise debilitating awareness of death. Spiritual seekers and atheists alike will be compelled and transformed by Matthew Alper's classic study of science and religion. The 'God' Part of the Brain has gained critical acclaim from some of the world's leading scientists, secular humanists, and theologians, and is as a must read for anyone who has pondered the question of God's existence, as well as the meaning of our own. Praise for The "God" Part of the Brain "This cult classic in many ways parallels Rene Descartes' search for reliable and certain knowledge...Drawing on such disciplines as philosophy, psychology, and biology, Alper argues that belief in a spiritual realm is an evolutionary coping method that developed to help humankind deal with the fear of death...Highly recommended."— Library Journal "I very much enjoyed the account of your spiritual journey and believe it would make excellent reading for every college student - the resultant residence-hall debates would be the best part of their education. It often occurs to me that if, against all odds, there is a judgmental God and heaven, it will come to pass that when the pearly gates open, those who had the valor to think for themselves will be escorted to the head of the line, garlanded, and given their own personal audience." — Edward O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize-Winner "This is an essential book for those in search of a scientific understanding of man's spiritual nature. Matthew Alper navigates the reader through a labyrinth of intriguing questions and then offers undoubtedly clear answers that lead to a better understanding of our objective reality." — Elena Rusyn, MD, PhD; Gray Laboratory; Harvard Medical School "What a wonderful book you have written. It was not only brilliant and provocative but also revolutionary in its approach to spirituality as an inherited trait."— Arnold Sadwin, MD, former chief of Neuropsychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania "A lively manifesto...For the discipline's specific application to the matter at hand, I've seen nothing that matches the fury of The 'God' Part of the Brain, which perhaps explains why it's earned something of a cult following." — Salon.com "All 6 billion plus inhabitants of Earth should be in possession of this book. Alper's tome should be placed in the sacred writings' section of libraries, bookstores, and dwellings throughout the world. Matthew Alper is the new Galileo...Immensely important...Defines in a clear and concise manner what each of us already knew but were afraid to admit and exclaim."— John Scoggins, PhD "Vibrant ... vivacious. An entertaining and provocative introduction to speculations concerning the neural basis of spirituality."— Free Inquiry Magazine
Posted in Science

At the Dawn of Modernity

Biology, Culture, and Material Life in Europe after the Year 1000

Author: David Levine

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520923676

Category: Social Science

Page: 438

View: 1759

Looking at a neglected period in the social history of modernization, David Levine investigates the centuries that followed the year 1000, when a new kind of society emerged in Europe. New commercial routines, new forms of agriculture, new methods of information technology, and increased population densities all played a role in the prolonged transition away from antiquity and toward modernity. At the Dawn of Modernity highlights both "top-down" and "bottom-up" changes that characterized the social experience of early modernization. In the former category are the Gregorian Reformation, the imposition of feudalism, and the development of centralizing state formations. Of equal importance to Levine's portrait of the emerging social order are the bottom-up demographic relations that structured everyday life, because the making of the modern world, in his view, also began in the decisions made by countless men and women regarding their families and circumstances. Levine ends his story with the cataclysm unleashed by the Black Death in 1348, which brought three centuries of growth to a grim end.
Posted in Social Science

Thicker Than Water

The Origins of Blood as Symbol and Ritual

Author: Melissa Meyer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135342008

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 4112

Blood is more than a fluid solution of cells, platelets and plasma. It is a symbol for the most basic of human concerns--life, death and family find expression in rituals surrounding everything from menstruation to human sacrifice. Comprehensive in its scope and provocative in its argument, this book examines beliefs and rituals concerning blood in a range of regional and religious contexts throughout human history. Meyer reveals the origins of a wide range of blood rituals, from the earliest surviving human symbolism of fertility and the hunt, to the Jewish bris, and the clitoridectomies given to young girls in parts of Africa. The book also explores how cultural practices influence gene selection and makes a connection with the natural sciences by exploring how color perception influences the human proclivity to create blood symbols and rituals.
Posted in History

Interferon: The Dawn of Recombinant Protein Drugs

Author: J. Lindenmann,W.-D. Schleuning

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3662037874

Category: Medical

Page: 138

View: 433

Forty years of Interferon I wish to dedicate this short introduction to the memory of Alick Isaacs (1921-1967), and to that of Sir Christopher Andrewes (1896-1988). Let us go back more than 40 years. In 1956 Isaacs was in charge of the Wodd Influenza Centre. Andrewes was head of the division of bac teriology and virology, and deputy director of the National Institute for Medical Research in London. When researchers are faced with a seemingly new phenomenon, ex planations are easy to come by. These explanations fall into two broad categories: the phenomenon in question is either due to something or to the lack of something. I apologize for the primitive way in which I ex press this, but I am going to give three examples, scattered over 100 years, of what I mean. First example: in 1880 the great French microbiologist Louis Pas teur was involved in work on chicken cholera. He was struck by the following observation: if a suitable chicken broth was inoculated with the bacterium, the organism grew profusely and the liquid became tur bid. If he now freed the fluid, by sedimentation or filtration, from the bulk of the organisms and re-inoculated it with the same bacterium, no growth occurred.
Posted in Medical

Essentials Of Plant Breeding

Author: K. V. Mohanan

Publisher: PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.

ISBN: 8120339681

Category: Plant breeding

Page: 155

View: 2573

Posted in Plant breeding

Academic Freedom at the Dawn of a New Century

How Terrorism, Governments, and Culture Wars Impact Free Speech

Author: Evan Gerstmann,Matthew Justin Streb

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804754446

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 9518

This is a provocative examination of the current state of academic freedom in the United States and around the world.
Posted in Law

Conversation

A History of a Declining Art

Author: Stephen Miller

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030013018X

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 3260

Essayist Stephen Miller pursues a lifelong interest in conversation by taking an historical and philosophical view of the subject. He chronicles the art of conversation in Western civilization from its beginnings in ancient Greece to its apex in eighteenth-century Britain to its current endangered state in America. As Harry G. Frankfurt brought wide attention to the art of bullshit in his recent bestselling On Bullshit, so Miller now brings the art of conversation into the light, revealing why good conversation matters and why it is in decline. Miller explores the conversation about conversation among such great writers as Cicero, Montaigne, Swift, Defoe, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and Virginia Woolf. He focuses on the world of British coffeehouses and clubs in “The Age of Conversation” and examines how this era ended. Turning his attention to the United States, the author traces a prolonged decline in the theory and practice of conversation from Benjamin Franklin through Hemingway to Dick Cheney. He cites our technology (iPods, cell phones, and video games) and our insistence on unguarded forthrightness as well as our fear of being judgmental as powerful forces that are likely to diminish the art of conversation.
Posted in History

Beasts of the Earth

Animals, Humans, and Disease

Author: E. Fuller Torrey,Robert H. Yolken

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813537894

Category: Medical

Page: 208

View: 3681

Humans have lived in close proximity to other animals for thousands of years. Recent scientific studies have even shown that the presence of animals has a positive effect on our physical and mental health. People with pets typically have lower blood pressure, show fewer symptoms of depression, and tend to get more exercise. But there is a darker side to the relationship between animals and humans. Animals are carriers of harmful infectious agents and the source of a myriad of human diseases. In recent years, the emergence of high-profile illnesses such as AIDS, SARS, West Nile virus, and bird flu has drawn much public attention, but as E. Fuller Torrey and Robert H. Yolken reveal, the transfer of deadly microbes from animals to humans is neither a new nor an easily avoided problem. Beginning with the domestication of farm animals nearly 10,000 years ago, Beasts of the Earth traces the ways that human-animal contact has evolved over time. Today, shared living quarters, overlapping ecosystems, and experimental surgical practices where organs or tissues are transplanted from non-humans into humans continue to open new avenues for the transmission of infectious agents. Other changes in human behavior like increased air travel, automated food processing, and threats of bioterrorism are increasing the contagion factor by transporting microbes further distances and to larger populations in virtually no time at all. While the authors urge that a better understanding of past diseases may help us lessen the severity of some illnesses, they also warn that, given our increasingly crowded planet, it is not a question of if but when and how often animal-transmitted diseases will pose serious challenges to human health in the future.
Posted in Medical

The Consuming Body

Author: Pasi Falk

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9780803989740

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 3716

This book provides a fascinating examination of the relationship between consumption, the idea of the body and the formation of the self. In tracing these connections, The Consuming Body develops a profile of individuality in the late twentieth century - in both its bodily and mental aspects. Pasi Falk offers a major synthesis and critical assessment of the debates surrounding the body, the self and contemporary consumer culture. The author explores two fundamental issues for modern social theory - the delineation of modern consumption and the body's historically changing position in various cultural orders. In the course of his argument he examines both metaphors of consumption and investigates the issues of representation i
Posted in Social Science

Homo Symbolicus

The Dawn of Language, Imagination and Spirituality

Author: Christopher Stuart Henshilwood,Francesco D'Errico

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9027211892

Category: Social Science

Page: 237

View: 2154

The emergence of symbolic culture, classically identified with the European cave paintings of the Ice Age, is now seen, in the light of recent groundbreaking discoveries, as a complex nonlinear process taking root in a remote past and in different regions of the planet. In this book the archaeologists responsible for some of these new discoveries, flanked by ethologists interested in primate cognition and cultural transmission, evolutionary psychologists modelling the emergence of metarepresentations, as well as biologists, philosophers, neuro-scientists and an astronomer combine their research findings. Their results call into question our very conception of human nature and animal behaviour, and they create epistemological bridges between disciplines that build the foundations for a novel vision of our lineage's cultural trajectory and the processes that have led to the emergence of human societies as we know them.
Posted in Social Science