The Conversion of Britain

Religion, Politics and Society in Britain, 600-800

Author: Barbara Yorke,Nigel Yates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317868307

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 876

The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples; the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. They spoke 3 different languages, Gaelic, Brittonic and Old English, and lived in a diverse cultural environment. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts occurred somewhat later, at the end of the 6th and during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and the rulers of different areas of Britain dictated the nature of the dominant religion in areas under their control. This book uses the Conversion and the Christianisation of the different peoples of Britainas a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their society. Because Christianity adapted to and affected the existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it’s the perfect medium through which to study various aspects of society that are difficult to study by any other means.
Posted in History

Christians and Pagans

The Conversion of Britain from Alban to Bede

Author: Malcolm D. Lambert

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300168268

Category: Great Britain

Page: 336

View: 9206

"Christians and Pagans" offers a comprehensive and highly readable account of the coming of Christianity to Britain, its coexistence or conflict with paganism, and its impact on the lives of both indigenous islanders and invading Anglo-Saxons. The Christianity of Roman Britain, so often treated in isolation, is here deftly integrated with the history of the British churches of the Celtic world, and with the histories of Ireland, Iona, and Pictland. Combining chronicle and literary evidence with the fruits of the latest archaeological research, Malcolm Lambert illuminates how the conversion process changed the hearts and minds of early Britain.
Posted in Great Britain

St. Augustine and the Conversion of England

Author: Richard Gameson

Publisher: Sutton Pub Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 7185

The mission of St Augustine of Canterbury and the subsequent conversion of the pagan Anglo-Saxons to Christianity had dramatic political, social and cultural implications as well as religious ones. The arrival of St Augustine in 597AD redefined England's relations with the continent on one hand and with the Celtic lands on the other; it led to new social mores; it added a new dimension to the political organization of the land; and it imported new forms of culture, notably book production and manuscript illumination.
Posted in History

The Conversion of Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg

From Isolation to International Engagement

Author: Lawrence S. Kaplan

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 081316060X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 3970

The United States has looked inward throughout most of its history, preferring to avoid "foreign entanglements," as George Washington famously advised. After World War II, however, Americans became more inclined to break with the past and take a prominent place on the world stage. Much has been written about the influential figures who stood at the center of this transformation, but remarkably little attention has been paid to Arthur H. Vandenberg (1884--1951), who played a crucial role in moving the nation from its isolationist past to an internationalist future. Vandenberg served as a U.S. senator from Michigan from 1928 to 1951 and was known in his early career for his fervent anti-interventionism. After 1945, he became heavily involved in the establishment of the United Nations and was a key player in the development of NATO. As chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee during 1947 and 1948, Vandenberg helped rally support for President Truman's foreign policy -- including the Marshall Plan -- and his leadership contributed to a short-lived era of congressional bipartisanship regarding international relations. In The Conversion of Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, Lawrence S. Kaplan offers the first critical biography of the distinguished statesman. He demonstrates how Vandenberg's story provides a window on the political and cultural changes taking place in America as the country assumed a radically different role in the world, and makes a seminal contribution to the history of U.S. foreign policy during the initial years of the Cold War.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Cross Goes North

Processes of Conversion in Northern Europe, AD 300-1300

Author: Martin Carver

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 9781843831259

Category: History

Page: 588

View: 8768

Papers from a conference held at York in July, 2003.
Posted in History

Conversion To Islam

Author: Kose,

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136168451

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 6184

Religious conversion is an immensely complex phenomenon. The term comprises such diverse experiences as increased devotion within the same religious structure, a shift from no religious commitment to a devout religious life, or a change from one religion to another. This study focuses on the conversion experiences of 70 native British converts to Islam. It addresses the following questions - why do people become Muslims, what are the backgrounds of the converts, what are the patterns of conversion to Islam, and how far are existing conversion theories applicable to the group under study. The full range of social and psychological forces at work in the conversion experience are examined with reference to the converts, whose whole life history - childhood, adolescent experiences and the conversion process itself - were examined in detail. Chapter 1 deals with the history and present situation of both life-long Muslims and converts living in Britain. Chapter 2 focuses on childhood and adolescent experiences reviewing the psychological and sociological theories of conversion and attempts to find out how far these theories are applicable to the converts to Islam. Chapter 3 examines the backgrounds of the converts regarding religion. It then analyzes the immediate antecedents of the conversion as well as the conversion process, focussing on version motifs. A conversion process model is also developed in this chapter. Chapter 4 looks at the post-conversion period to find out what changes the converts underwent. It also examines the relationship between converts, their parents and society at large. Chapter 5 reveals the findings on conversion through Sufism. Comparisons between conversion through Sufism and through new religious movements in the West are also made. This study should be an important addition to the study of religious conversion, as conversion to Islam either from outside or within Islam is widely neglected in the literature.
Posted in Social Science

The History of the Medieval World: From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade

Author: Susan Wise Bauer

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393078176

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 2356

A masterful narrative of the Middle Ages, when religion became a weapon for kings all over the world. From the schism between Rome and Constantinople to the rise of the T’ang Dynasty, from the birth of Muhammad to the crowning of Charlemagne, this erudite book tells the fascinating, often violent story of kings, generals, and the peoples they ruled. In her earlier work, The History of the Ancient World, Susan Wise Bauer wrote of the rise of kingship based on might. But in the years between the fourth and the twelfth centuries, rulers had to find new justification for their power, and they turned to divine truth or grace to justify political and military action. Right thus replaces might as the engine of empire. Not just Christianity and Islam but the religions of the Persians and the Germans, and even Buddhism, are pressed into the service of the state. This phenomenon—stretching from the Americas all the way to Japan—changes religion, but it also changes the state.
Posted in History

The Convert Kings

Power and Religious Affiliation in Early Anglo-Saxon England

Author: N. J. Higham

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719048289

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 5538

The story of the conversion of the English to Christianity traditionally begins with Augustine's arrival in 597. This text offers a critical re-evaluation of the process of conversion which assesses what the act really meant to new converts, who was responsible for it, and why particular figures both accepted conversion for themselves and threw their influence behind the spread of Christianity. The conversion has often been seen as something which missionaries did to the English. The book restores responsibility to the English and, in particular, King Aethelbert, Edwin, Oswald and Oswin, and it is their religious policies that form the focus of this text.
Posted in History

The Barbarian Conversion

From Paganism to Christianity

Author: Richard A. Fletcher

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520218598

Category: History

Page: 562

View: 6193

"An investigation of the process by which large parts of Europe accepted the Christian faith between the fourth and the fourteenth centuries and of some of the cultural consequences that flowed therefrom." In a work of splendid scholarship that reflects both a firm mastery of difficult sources and a keen intuition, one of Britain's foremost medievalists tells the story of the Christianization of Europe. It is a very large story, for conversion encompassed much more than religious belief. With it came enormous cultural change: Latin literacy and books, Roman notions of law and property, and the concept of town life, as well as new tastes in food, drink, and dress. Whether from faith or by force, from self-interest or by revelation, conversion had an immense impact that is with us even today.
Posted in History

Converting Women

Gender and Protestant Christianity in Colonial South India

Author: Eliza F. Kent

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198036951

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 7712

With the emergence of Hindu nationalism, the conversion of Indians to Christianity has become a volatile issue, erupting in violence against converts and missionaries. At the height of British colonialism, however, conversion was a path to upward mobility for low-castes and untouchables, especially in the Tamil-speaking south of India. In this book, Eliza F. Kent takes a fresh look at these conversions, focusing especially on the experience of women converts and the ways in which conversion transformed gender roles and expectations. Kent argues that the creation of a new, "respectable" community identity was central to the conversion process for the agricultural laborers and artisans who embraced Protestant Christianity under British rule. At the same time, she shows, this new identity was informed as much by elite Sanskritic customs and ideologies as by Western Christian discourse. Stigmatized by the dominant castes for their ritually polluting occupations and relaxed rules governing kinship and marriage, low-caste converts sought to validate their new higher-status identity in part by the reform of gender relations. These reforms affected ideals of femininity and masculinity in the areas of marriage, domesticity, and dress. By the creation of a "discourse of respectability," says Kent, Tamil Christians hoped to counter the cultural justifications for their social, economic, and sexual exploitation at the hands of high-caste landowners and village elites. Kent's focus on the interactions between Western women missionaries and the Indian Christian women not only adds depth to our understanding of colonial and patriarchal power dynamics, but to the intricacies of conversion itself. Posing an important challenge to normative notions of conversion as a privatized, individual moment in time, Kent's study takes into consideration the ways that public behavior, social status, and the transformation of everyday life inform religious conversion.
Posted in Religion