The Conversion of Britain

Religion, Politics and Society in Britain, 600-800

Author: Barbara Yorke,Nigel Yates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317868307

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 3028

The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples; the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. They spoke 3 different languages, Gaelic, Brittonic and Old English, and lived in a diverse cultural environment. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts occurred somewhat later, at the end of the 6th and during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and the rulers of different areas of Britain dictated the nature of the dominant religion in areas under their control. This book uses the Conversion and the Christianisation of the different peoples of Britainas a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their society. Because Christianity adapted to and affected the existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it’s the perfect medium through which to study various aspects of society that are difficult to study by any other means.
Posted in History

Christians and Pagans

The Conversion of Britain from Alban to Bede

Author: Malcolm D. Lambert

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300168268

Category: Great Britain

Page: 336

View: 1158

"Christians and Pagans" offers a comprehensive and highly readable account of the coming of Christianity to Britain, its coexistence or conflict with paganism, and its impact on the lives of both indigenous islanders and invading Anglo-Saxons. The Christianity of Roman Britain, so often treated in isolation, is here deftly integrated with the history of the British churches of the Celtic world, and with the histories of Ireland, Iona, and Pictland. Combining chronicle and literary evidence with the fruits of the latest archaeological research, Malcolm Lambert illuminates how the conversion process changed the hearts and minds of early Britain.
Posted in Great Britain

The Barbarian Conversion

From Paganism to Christianity

Author: Richard A. Fletcher

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520218598

Category: History

Page: 562

View: 6096

"An investigation of the process by which large parts of Europe accepted the Christian faith between the fourth and the fourteenth centuries and of some of the cultural consequences that flowed therefrom." In a work of splendid scholarship that reflects both a firm mastery of difficult sources and a keen intuition, one of Britain's foremost medievalists tells the story of the Christianization of Europe. It is a very large story, for conversion encompassed much more than religious belief. With it came enormous cultural change: Latin literacy and books, Roman notions of law and property, and the concept of town life, as well as new tastes in food, drink, and dress. Whether from faith or by force, from self-interest or by revelation, conversion had an immense impact that is with us even today.
Posted in History

Pagan Britain

Author: Ronald Hutton

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300198582

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1470

Britain's pagan past, with its mysterious monuments, atmospheric sites, enigmatic artifacts, bloodthirsty legends, and cryptic inscriptions, is both enthralling and perplexing to a resident of the twenty-first century. In this ambitious and thoroughly up-to-date book, Ronald Hutton reveals the long development, rapid suppression, and enduring cultural significance of paganism, from the Paleolithic Era to the coming of Christianity. He draws on an array of recently discovered evidence and shows how new findings have radically transformed understandings of belief and ritual in Britain before the arrival of organized religion. Setting forth a chronological narrative, Hutton along the way makes side visits to explore specific locations of ancient pagan activity. He includes the well-known sacred sites—Stonehenge, Avebury, Seahenge, Maiden Castle, Anglesey—as well as more obscure locations across the mainland and coastal islands. In tireless pursuit of the elusive “why” of pagan behavior, Hutton astonishes with the breadth of his understanding of Britain’s deep past and inspires with the originality of his insights.
Posted in History

After Rome

Author: T. M. Charles-Edwards,Thomas Charles-Edwards,Paul Langford

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 5027

The chapters in this volume, each written by a leading scholar of the period, analyze in turn the different nationalities and kingdoms that existed in the British Isles from the end of the Roman empire to the coming of the Vikings, the process of conversion to Christianity, the development of art and of a written culture, and the interaction between this written culture and the societies of the day.
Posted in History

Reformation Divided

Catholics, Protestants and the Conversion of England

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472934342

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 5783

Published to mark the 500th anniversary of the events of 1517, Reformation Divided explores the impact in England of the cataclysmic transformations of European Christianity in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The religious revolution initiated by Martin Luther is usually referred to as 'The Reformation', a tendentious description implying that the shattering of the medieval religious foundations of Europe was a single process, in which a defective form of Christianity was replaced by one that was unequivocally benign, 'the midwife of the modern world'. The book challenges these assumptions by tracing the ways in which the project of reforming Christendom from within, initiated by Christian 'humanists' like Erasmus and Thomas More, broke apart into conflicting and often murderous energies and ideologies, dividing not only Catholic from Protestant, but creating deep internal rifts within all the churches which emerged from Europe's religious conflicts. The book is in three parts: In 'Thomas More and Heresy', Duffy examines how and why England's greatest humanist apparently abandoned the tolerant humanism of his youthful masterpiece Utopia, and became the bitterest opponent of the early Protestant movement. 'Counter-Reformation England' explores the ways in which post-Reformation English Catholics accommodated themselves to a complex new identity as persecuted religious dissidents within their own country, but in a European context, active participants in the global renewal of the Catholic Church. The book's final section 'The Godly and the Conversion of England' considers the ideals and difficulties of radical reformers attempting to transform the conventional Protestantism of post-Reformation England into something more ardent and committed. In addressing these subjects, Duffy shines new light on the fratricidal ideological conflicts which lasted for more than a century, and whose legacy continues to shape the modern world.
Posted in Religion

In Search of the Dark Ages

Author: Michael Wood

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448141516

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 9306

This edition of Michael Wood's groundbreaking first book explores the fascinating and mysterious centuries between the Romans and the Norman Conquest of 1066. In Search of the Dark Ages vividly conjures up some of the most famous names in British history, such as Queen Boadicea, leader of a terrible war of resistance against the Romans, and King Arthur, the 'once and future king', for whose riddle Wood proposes a new and surprising solution. Here too, warts and all, are the Saxon, Viking and Norman kings who laid the political foundations of England - Offa of Mercia, Alfred the Great, Athelstan, and William the Conqueror, whose victory at Hastings in 1066 marked the end of Anglo-Saxon England. Reflecting recent historical, textual and archaeological research, this revised edition of Michael Wood's classic book overturns preconceptions of the Dark Ages as a shadowy and brutal era, showing them to be a richly exciting and formative period in the history of Britain. 'With In Search of the Dark Ages, Michael Wood wrote the book for history on TV.' The Times 'Michael Wood is the maker of some of the best TV documentaries ever made on history and archaeology.' Times Literary Supplement
Posted in History

Edwin: High King of Britain

Author: Edoardo Albert

Publisher: Lion Fiction

ISBN: 1782640614

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 9258

Edwin, the deposed king of Northumbria, seeks refuge at the court of King Raedwald of East Anglia. But Raedwald is urged to kill his guest by Aethelfrith, Edwin’s usurper. As Edwin walks by the shore, alone and at bay, he is confronted by a mysterious figure – the missionary Paulinus – who prophesies that he will become High King of Britain. It is a turning point. Through battles and astute political alliances Edwin rises to great power, in the process marrying the Kentish princess Aethelburh. As part of the marriage contract the princess is allowed to retain her Christian faith. But, in these times, to be a king is not a recipe for a long life … This turbulent and tormented period in British history sees the conversion of the Anglo-Saxon settlers who have forced their way on to British shores over previous centuries, arriving first to pillage, then to farm and trade – and to come to terms with the world view of the Celtic tribes they have driven out.
Posted in Fiction

The Conversion of Europe (TEXT ONLY)

Author: Richard Fletcher

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0007502966

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 1144

The story of how Europe was converted to Christianity from 300AD until the barbarian Lithuanians finally capitulated at the astonishingly late date of 1386. It is an epic tale from one of the most gifted historians of today.
Posted in History

The Rotten State of Britain

Author: Eamonn Butler

Publisher: Gibson Square Books

ISBN: 9781906142377

Category: Great Britain

Page: 314

View: 9823

Under Gordon Brown's leadership, Britain has achieved that sinking feeling without knowing exactly why things are so bad and how it happened so fast. This book analyses what went disastrously wrong and why it will continue to get worse under current policies.
Posted in Great Britain

St. Augustine and the Conversion of England

Author: Richard Gameson

Publisher: Sutton Pub Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 328

The mission of St Augustine of Canterbury and the subsequent conversion of the pagan Anglo-Saxons to Christianity had dramatic political, social and cultural implications as well as religious ones. The arrival of St Augustine in 597AD redefined England's relations with the continent on one hand and with the Celtic lands on the other; it led to new social mores; it added a new dimension to the political organization of the land; and it imported new forms of culture, notably book production and manuscript illumination.
Posted in History

The Catholics

The Church and its People in Britain and Ireland, from the Reformation to the Present Day

Author: Roy Hattersley

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448182972

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 6439

The story of Catholicism in Britain from the Reformation to the present day, from a master of popular history – 'A first-class storyteller' The Times Throughout the three hundred years that followed the Act of Supremacy – which, by making Henry VIII head of the Church, confirmed in law the breach with Rome – English Catholics were prosecuted, persecuted and penalised for the public expression of their faith. Even after the passing of the emancipation acts Catholics were still the victims of institutionalised discrimination. The first book to tell the story of the Catholics in Britain in a single volume, The Catholics includes much previously unpublished information. It focuses on the lives, and sometimes deaths, of individual Catholics – martyrs and apostates, priests and laymen, converts and recusants. It tells the story of the men and women who faced the dangers and difficulties of being what their enemies still call ‘Papists’. It describes the laws which circumscribed their lives, the political tensions which influenced their position within an essentially Anglican nation and the changes in dogma and liturgy by which Rome increasingly alienated their Protestant neighbours – and sometime even tested the loyalty of faithful Catholics. The survival of Catholicism in Britain is the triumph of more than simple faith. It is the victory of moral and spiritual unbending certainty. Catholicism survives because it does not compromise. It is a characteristic that excites admiration in even a hardened atheist.
Posted in History

A History of Religion in Britain

Practice and Belief from Pre-Roman Times to the Present

Author: Sheridan Gilley,W. J. Sheils

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631193784

Category: Religion

Page: 608

View: 7746

This book is the first one volume history of religious belief and practice in England, Wales and Scotland. It covers the period from Roman times to the present and has been written by twenty-three scholars, all writing accessibly for a wide readership.
Posted in Religion

British Imperialism

Author: Rob Johnson

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137130431

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 5040

What was British imperialism and was it an important element of modern globalization? Were economic, political or military factors paramount in imperial expansion? Do post-colonial theories assist or mislead historians? How have histories of imperialism changed, and are current analyses satisfactory? Robert Johnson's invaluable guide offers a succint, easy-to-follow introduction to the key issues and historiography of British imperialism from its origins to the conversion to the Commonwealth. British Imperialism - provides concise introductions to key questions and debates - takes a question-based approach to analysis of the material - offers an assessment of the significance of economic, military and political factors in imperial expansion and decolonization - presents critical appraisals of the most recent controversies including neo-colonialism, cultural imperialism, post-colonial theory, and gender and imperialism - includes a useful guide to further reading Using vivid examples, Johnson clearly explains the nature of British imperialism and enables the reader to understand the causes, course and immediate consequences of the British-colonial encounter on a world-wide scale. His book is an essential starting point for all those new to the subject and a helpful introduction to more recent debates.
Posted in History

The Cross Goes North

Processes of Conversion in Northern Europe, AD 300-1300

Author: Martin Carver

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 9781843831259

Category: History

Page: 588

View: 7648

Papers from a conference held at York in July, 2003.
Posted in History