The Classical Hollywood Cinema

Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960

Author: David Bordwell,Janet Staiger,Kristin Thompson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134988095

Category: Social Science

Page: 658

View: 930

'A dense, challenging and important book.' Philip French Observer 'At the very least, this blockbuster is probably the best single volume history of Hollywood we're likely to get for a very long time.' Paul Kerr City Limits 'Persuasively argued, the book is also packed with facts, figures and photographs.' Nigel Andrews Financial Times Acclaimed for their breakthrough approach, Bordwell, Staiger and Thompson analyze the basic conditions of American film-making as a historical institution and consider to what extent Hollywood film production constitutes a systematic enterprise, in both its style and its business operations. Despite differences of director, genre or studio, most Hollywood films operate within a set of shared assumptions about how a film should look and sound. Such assumptions are neither natural nor inevitable; but because classical-style films have been the type most widely seen, they have come to be accepted as the 'norm' of film-making and viewing. The authors show how these classical conventions were formulated and standardized, and how they responded to the arrival of sound, colour, widescreen ratios and stereophonic sound. They argue that each new technological development has served a function within an existing narrational system. The authors also examine how the Hollywood cinema standardized the film-making process itself. They describe how, over the course of its history, Hollywood developed distinct modes of production in a constant search for maximum efficiency, predictability and novelty. Set apart by its combination of theoretical analysis and empirical evidence, this book is the standard work on the classical Hollywood cinema style of film-making from the silent era to the 1960s. Now available in paperback, it is a 'must' for film students, lecturers and all those seriously interested in the development of the film industry.
Posted in Social Science

Die Filmgespenster Der Postmoderne

Author: David Bordwell

Publisher: Verlag Der Autoren

ISBN: N.A

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 133

View: 5259

Posted in Performing Arts

Der Herr der Ringe im Film

Event-Movie, postmoderne Ästhetik, aktive Rezeption

Author: Sven Jöckel

Publisher: Verlag Reinhard Fischer

ISBN: 9783889273826

Category: Lord of the Rings films

Page: 271

View: 9934

Posted in Lord of the Rings films

New Hollywood Cinema

An Introduction

Author: Geoff King

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 085773105X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 428

What exactly is New Hollywood? - is the first question answered by Geoff King in his lively and accessible introduction to modern Hollywood cinema and its films. In the expanding literature on this area, New Hollywood Cinema fills a gap by offering a single, up-to-date volume covering the ground coherently and accessibly. From the radical gestures of the ‘Hollywood Renaissance’ of the late 1960s and early 1970s to the current dominance of the corporate blockbuster, this book focuses on the interactions between the different levels of the film industry. Studios are now merely one part of the broader ventures of huge media conglomerates. Hollywood is over-run by the demands of publicity and marketing. It also takes its cue from much TV and filmed advertising. How do these new developments shape the form and content of the films we see? King takes a look - bringing examples from all the different genres of Hollywood films to bear on the issues raised. Numerous case-studies of films, film-makers and production companies are used to illustrate these complex but very well-rendered ideas.
Posted in Performing Arts

Oberflächenrausch

Postmoderne und Postklassik im Kino der 90er Jahre

Author: Jens Eder

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 3825855236

Category: Film

Page: 263

View: 6876

Posted in Film

The Silent Cinema Reader

Author: Lee Grieveson,Peter Krämer

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415252843

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 423

View: 2571

The Silent Cinema Reader brings together key writings on cinema from the beginnings of film in 1894 to the advent of sound in 1927, addressing the development of film production and exhibition technologies, methods of distribution, film form, and film culture during this critical period on film history. Thematic sections address: film projection and variety shows; storytelling and the Nickelodeon; cinema and reform; feature films and cinema programs; classical Hollywood cinema and European national cinemas. Each section is introduced by the editors, and contains suggestions for further readings and film viewings.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Classical Hollywood Reader

Author: Steve Neale

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113572007X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 496

View: 351

The Classical Hollywood Reader brings together essential readings to provide a history of Hollywood from the 1910s to the mid 1960s. Following on from a Prologue that discusses the aesthetic characteristics of Classical Hollywood films, Part 1 covers the period between the 1910s and the mid-to-late 1920s. It deals with the advent of feature-length films in the US and the growing national and international dominance of the companies responsible for their production, distribution and exhibition. In doing so, it also deals with film making practices, aspects of style, the changing roles played by women in an increasingly business-oriented environment, and the different audiences in the US for which Hollywood sought to cater. Part 2 covers the period between the coming of sound in the mid 1920s and the beginnings of the demise of the `studio system` in late 1940s. In doing so it deals with the impact of sound on films and film production in the US and Europe, the subsequent impact of the Depression and World War II on the industry and its audiences, the growth of unions, and the roles played by production managers and film stars at the height of the studio era. Part 3 deals with aspects of style, censorship, technology, and film production. It includes articles on the Production Code, music and sound, cinematography, and the often neglected topic of animation. Part 4 covers the period between 1946 and 1966. It deals with the demise of the studio system and the advent of independent production. In an era of demographic and social change, it looks at the growth of drive-in theatres, the impact of television, the advent of new technologies, the increasing importance of international markets, the Hollywood blacklist, the rise in art house imports and in overseas production, and the eventual demise of the Production Code. Designed especially for courses on Hollywood Cinema, the Reader includes a number of newly researched and written chapters and a series of introductions to each of its parts. It concludes with an epilogue, a list of resources for further research, and an extensive bibliography.
Posted in Performing Arts

A Handbook of Media and Communication Research

Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies

Author: Klaus Bruhn Jensen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134589999

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 352

View: 3311

A Handbook of Media and Communications Research presents qualitative as well as quantitative approaches to the analysis and interpretation of media, covering perspectives from both the social sciences and the humanities. The Handbook offers a comprehensive review of earlier research and a set of guidelines for how to think about, plan, and carry out studies of media in different social and cultural contexts. Divided into sections on the history, systematics and pragmatics of research, and written by internationally acknowledged specialists in each area, the Handbook will be a standard reference work for students and researchers.
Posted in Language Arts & Disciplines

Hollywoods kritischer Blick

das soziale Melodrama in der amerikanischen Kultur 1840-1950

Author: Christof Decker

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN: 9783593373560

Category: Melodrama in motion pictures

Page: 516

View: 6161

Posted in Melodrama in motion pictures

Hollywood Lighting from the Silent Era to Film Noir

Author: Patrick Keating

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231520204

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 312

View: 7415

Lighting performs essential functions in Hollywood films, enhancing the glamour, clarifying the action, and intensifying the mood. Examining every facet of this understated art form, from the glowing backlights of the silent period to the shaded alleys of film noir, Patrick Keating affirms the role of Hollywood lighting as a distinct, compositional force. Closely analyzing Girl Shy (1924), Anna Karenina (1935), Only Angels Have Wings (1939), and T-Men (1947), along with other brilliant classics, Keating describes the unique problems posed by these films and the innovative ways cinematographers handled the challenge. Once dismissed as crank-turning laborers, these early cinematographers became skillful professional artists by carefully balancing the competing demands of story, studio, and star. Enhanced by more than one hundred illustrations, this volume counters the notion that style took a backseat to storytelling in Hollywood film, proving that the lighting practices of the studio era were anything but neutral, uniform, and invisible. Cinematographers were masters of multifunctionality and negotiation, honing their craft to achieve not only realistic fantasy but also pictorial artistry.
Posted in Performing Arts

Hideous Progeny

Disability, Eugenics, and Classic Horror Cinema

Author: Angela Smith

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231527853

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 384

View: 4065

Twisted bodies, deformed faces, aberrant behavior, and abnormal desires characterized the hideous creatures of classic Hollywood horror, which thrilled audiences with their sheer grotesqueness. Most critics have interpreted these traits as symptoms of sexual repression or as metaphors for other kinds of marginalized identities, yet Angela M. Smith conducts a richer investigation into the period's social and cultural preoccupations. She finds instead a fascination with eugenics and physical and cognitive debility in the narrative and spectacle of classic 1930s horror, heightened by the viewer's desire for visions of vulnerability and transformation. Reading such films as Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), Freaks (1932), and Mad Love (1935) against early-twentieth-century disability discourse and propaganda on racial and biological purity, Smith showcases classic horror's dependence on the narratives of eugenics and physiognomics. She also notes the genre's conflicted and often contradictory visualizations. Smith ultimately locates an indictment of biological determinism in filmmakers' visceral treatments, which take the impossibility of racial improvement and bodily perfection to sensationalistic heights. Playing up the artifice and conventions of disabled monsters, filmmakers exploited the fears and yearnings of their audience, accentuating both the perversity of the medical and scientific gaze and the debilitating experience of watching horror. Classic horror films therefore encourage empathy with the disabled monster, offering captive viewers an unsettling encounter with their own impairment. Smith's work profoundly advances cinema and disability studies, in addition to general histories concerning the construction of social and political attitudes toward the Other.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Cinema of Eisenstein

Author: David Bordwell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781138140578

Category:

Page: 344

View: 9322

The Cinema of Eisensteinis David Bordwell's comprehensive analysis of the films of Sergei Eisenstein, arguably the key figure in the entire history of film. The director of such classics as Potemkin,Ivan the Terrible,October, Strike,and Alexander Nevsky, Eisenstein theorized montage, presented Soviet realism to the world, and mastered the concept of film epic. Comprehensive, authoritative, and illustrated throughout, this classic work deserves to be on the shelf of every serious student of cinema.
Posted in

Film and Stereotype

A Challenge for Cinema and Theory

Author: Jörg Schweinitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231525214

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 396

View: 4439

Since the early days of film, critics and theorists have contested the value of formula, cliché, conventional imagery, and recurring narrative patterns of reduced complexity in cinema. Whether it's the high-noon showdown or the last-minute rescue, a lonely woman standing in the window or two lovers saying goodbye in the rain, many films rely on scenes of stereotype, and audiences have come to expect them. Outlining a comprehensive theory of film stereotype, a device as functionally important as it is problematic to a film's narrative, Jörg Schweinitz constructs a fascinating though overlooked critical history from the 1920s to today. Drawing on theories of stereotype in linguistics, literary analysis, art history, and psychology, Schweinitz identifies the major facets of film stereotype and articulates the positions of theorists in response to the challenges posed by stereotype. He reviews the writing of Susan Sontag, Roland Barthes, Theodor W. Adorno, Rudolf Arnheim, Robert Musil, Béla Balázs, Hugo Münsterberg, and Edgar Morin, and he revives the work of less-prominent writers, such as René Fülöp-Miller and Gilbert Cohen-Séat, tracing the evolution of the discourse into a postmodern celebration of the device. Through detailed readings of specific films, Schweinitz also maps the development of models for adapting and reflecting stereotype, from early irony (Alexander Granowski) and conscious rejection (Robert Rossellini) to critical deconstruction (Robert Altman in the 1970s) and celebratory transfiguration (Sergio Leone and the Coen brothers). Altogether a provocative spectacle, Schweinitz's history reveals the role of film stereotype in shaping processes of communication and recognition, as well as its function in growing media competence in audiences beyond cinema.
Posted in Performing Arts

A Grammar of Murder

Violent Scenes and Film Form

Author: Karla Oeler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226617963

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 8027

The dark shadows and offscreen space that force us to imagine violence we cannot see. The real slaughter of animals spliced with the fictional killing of men. The missing countershot from the murder victim’s point of view. Such images, or absent images, Karla Oeler contends, distill how the murder scene challenges and changes film. Reexamining works by such filmmakers as Renoir, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Jarmusch, and Eisenstein, Oeler traces the murder scene’s intricate connections to the great breakthroughs in the theory and practice of montage and the formulation of the rules and syntax of Hollywood genre. She argues that murder plays such a central role in film because it mirrors, on multiple levels, the act of cinematic representation. Death and murder at once eradicate life and call attention to its former existence, just as cinema conveys both the reality and the absence of the objects it depicts. But murder shares with cinema not only this interplay between presence and absence, movement and stillness: unlike death, killing entails the deliberate reduction of a singular subject to a disposable object. Like cinema, it involves a crucial choice about what to cut and what to keep.
Posted in Performing Arts

Storytelling in the New Hollywood

Understanding Classical Narrative Technique

Author: Kristin Thompson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674839755

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 398

View: 2943

Drawing on a wide range of films from the 1920s to the 1990s--from Keaton's "Our Hospitality" to "Casablanca" to "Terminator 2," Kristin Thompson offers the first in-depth analysis of Hollywood's storytelling techniques and how they are used to make complex, easily comprehensible, entertaining films. Thompson then demonstrates in detail how classical narrative techniques work in ten box-office and critical successes made since the New Hollywood began in the 1970s including "Tootsie," "The Silence of the Lambs, Parenthood, Alien," and "Hannah and Her Sisters."
Posted in Language Arts & Disciplines

American Cinema of the 1930s

Themes and Variations

Author: Ina Rae Hark

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813543037

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 296

View: 5438

Probably no decade saw as many changes in the Hollywood film industry and its product as the 1930s did. At the beginning of the decade, the industry was still struggling with the transition to talking pictures. Gangster films and naughty comedies starring Mae West were popular in urban areas, but aroused threats of censorship in the heartland. Whether the film business could survive the economic effects of the Crash was up in the air. By 1939, popularly called "Hollywood's Greatest Year," films like Gone With the Wind and The Wizard of Oz used both color and sound to spectacular effect, and remain American icons today. The "mature oligopoly" that was the studio system had not only weathered the Depression and become part of mainstream culture through the establishment and enforcement of the Production Code, it was a well-oiled, vertically integrated industrial powerhouse. The ten original essays in American Cinema of the 1930s focus on sixty diverse films of the decade, including Dracula, The Public Enemy, Trouble in Paradise, 42nd Street, King Kong, Imitation of Life, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Swing Time, Angels with Dirty Faces, Nothing Sacred, Jezebel, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, and Stagecoach .
Posted in Performing Arts

Indie

An American Film Culture

Author: Michael Z. Newman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231513526

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 6032

America's independent films often seem to defy classification. Their strategies of storytelling and representation range from raw, no-budget projects to more polished releases of Hollywood's "specialty" divisions. Yet understanding American indies involves more than just considering films. Filmmakers, distributors, exhibitors, festivals, critics, and audiences all shape the art's identity, which is always understood in relation to the Hollywood mainstream. By locating the American indie film in the historical context of the "Sundance-Miramax" era (the mid-1980s to the end of the 2000s), Michael Z. Newman considers indie cinema as an alternative American film culture. His work isolates patterns of character and realism, formal play, and oppositionality and the functions of the festivals, art houses, and critical media promoting them. He also accounts for the power of audiences to identify indie films in distinction to mainstream Hollywood and to seek socially emblematic characters and playful form in their narratives. Analyzing films such as Welcome to the Dollhouse (1996), Lost in Translation (2003), Pulp Fiction (1994), and Juno (2007), along with the work of Nicole Holofcener, Jim Jarmusch, John Sayles, Steven Soderbergh, and the Coen brothers, Newman investigates the conventions that cast indies as culturally legitimate works of art. He binds these diverse works together within a cluster of distinct viewing strategies and invites a reevaluation of the difference of independent cinema and its relationship to class and taste culture.
Posted in Performing Arts

Beyond the Bottom Line

The Producer in Film and Television Studies

Author: Andrew Spicer,Anthony McKenna,Christopher Meir

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1441162887

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 4066

This is the first collection of original critical essays devoted to exploring the misunderstood, neglected and frequently caricatured role played by the film producer. The editors' introduction provides a conceptual and methodological overview, arguing that the producer's complex and multifaceted role is crucial to a film's success or failure. The collection is divided into three sections where detailed individual essays explore a broad range of contrasting producers working in different historical, geographical, generic and industrial contexts. Rather than suggest there is a single type of producer, the collection analyses the rich variety of roles producers play, providing fascinating and informative insights into how the film industry actually works. This groundbreaking collection challenges several of the conventional orthodoxies of film studies, providing a new approach that will become required reading for scholars and students.
Posted in Performing Arts

Cinematic Appeals

The Experience of New Movie Technologies

Author: Ariel Rogers

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231535783

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 9028

Cinematic Appeals follows the effect of technological innovation on the cinema experience, specifically the introduction of widescreen and stereoscopic 3D systems in the 1950s, the rise of digital cinema in the 1990s, and the transition to digital 3D since 2005. Widescreen cinema promised to draw the viewer into the world of the screen, enabling larger-than-life close-ups of already larger-than-life actors. This technology fostered the illusion of physically entering a film, enhancing the semblance of realism. Alternatively, the digital era was less concerned with the viewer's physical response and more with information flow, awe, and the reevaluation of spatiality and embodiment. This study ultimately shows how cinematic technology and the human experience shape and respond to each other over time.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Way Hollywood Tells it

Story and Style in Modern Movies

Author: David Bordwell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520232275

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 298

View: 4341

Includes information on Woody Allen, Robert Altman, Asian films, Brian de Plama, European cinema, Alfred Hitchcock, Hong Kong films, Sam Peckinpah, Arthur Penn, Otto Preminger, Brett Ratner, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Oliver Stone, Orson Welles, American Graffiti, At Long Last Love, A Beautiful Mind, Bonnie and Clyde, Chinatown, Citizen Kane, The Godfather, Jaws, Jerry Maguire, Lord of the Rings trilogy, Matrix trilogy, Memento, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Sixth Sense, Star Wars series, Two Weeks Notice, arcing shots, axis of action, black and white footage, camera movement, characterization, climax, close ups, comedies, complicating action, cutting, dialogue hook, directors, editing, energy, epilogue, establishing shots, fantasy, film noir, flashbacks, following shots, foreshadowing, four part structure, framing, handheld shots, heroes, horror, hyperclassical construction, independent films, innovation, intensified continuity, intercutting, long lens, long takes, low budget films, montage sequences, motifs, multiple camera shooting, narrative, over the shoulder shots, overt narration, plot, postclassical cinema, protagonists, puzzle films, rapid cutting, reverse order plotting, romantic comedy, science fiction, set up, shots, singles, soundtracks, special effects, Stedicam, story development, studio era, television, thrillers, time, tracking shots, video, violence, visceral effects, visual style, wide angle lens, wide screen, wipe by cuts, wipes, etc.
Posted in Performing Arts