Children Bob Moses Led

Author: William Heath

Publisher: NewSouth Books

ISBN: 1603063358

Category: Fiction

Page: 364

View: 7454

Winner of the Hackney Literary Award and selected in 2002 by Time as one of the eleven best novels on the African American experience, The Children Bob Moses Led is a compelling, powerful chronicle of the events of Freedom Summer. The novel is narrated in alternating sections by Tom Morton, a white college student who joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee for the summer, and Bob Moses, the charismatic leader of the Mississippi Summer Project. With clarity and honesty, Heath’s novel recalls the bittersweet spirit of the 1960s and conveys the hopeful idealism of the young students as they begin to understand both the harsh reality faced by those they try to help and the enormity of the oppression they must overcome.
Posted in Fiction

And Gently He Shall Lead Them

Robert Parris Moses and Civil Rights in Mississippi

Author: Eric Burner

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814712504

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 308

View: 3724

The meaning of the American Revolution has always been a much-contested question, and asking it is particularly important today: the standard, easily digested narrative puts the Founding Fathers at the head of a unified movement, failing to acknowledge the deep divisions in Revolutionary-era society and the many different historical interpretations that have followed. Whose American Revolution Was It? speaks both to the ways diverse groups of Americans who lived through the Revolution might have answered that question and to the different ways historians through the decades have interpreted the Revolution for our own time. As the only volume to offer an accessible and sweeping discussion of the period’s historiography and its historians,Whose American Revolution Was It? is an essential reference for anyone studying early American history. The first section, by Alfred F. Young, begins in 1925 with historian J. Franklin Jameson and takes the reader through the successive schools of interpretation up to the 1990s. The second section, by Gregory H. Nobles, focuses primarily on the ways present-day historians have expanded our understanding of the broader social history of the Revolution, bringing onto the stage farmers and artisans, who made up the majority of white men, as well as African Americans, Native Americans, and women of all social classes.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Robert Parris Moses

A Life in Civil Rights and Leadership at the Grassroots

Author: Laura Visser-Maessen

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 146962799X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 456

View: 3145

One of the most influential leaders in the civil rights movement, Robert Parris Moses was essential in making Mississippi a central battleground state in the fight for voting rights. As a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Moses presented himself as a mere facilitator of grassroots activism rather than a charismatic figure like Martin Luther King Jr. His self-effacing demeanor and his success, especially in steering the events that led to the volatile 1964 Freedom Summer and the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, paradoxically gave him a reputation of nearly heroic proportions. Examining the dilemmas of a leader who worked to cultivate local leadership, historian Laura Visser-Maessen explores the intellectual underpinnings of Moses's strategy, its achievements, and its struggles. This new biography recasts Moses as an effective, hands-on organizer, safeguarding his ideals while leading from behind the scenes. By returning Moses to his rightful place among the foremost leaders of the movement, Visser-Maessen testifies to Moses's revolutionary approach to grassroots leadership and the power of the individual in generating social change.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 9: Literature

Author: M. Thomas Inge

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469616645

Category: Reference

Page: 536

View: 2003

Offering a comprehensive view of the South's literary landscape, past and present, this volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture celebrates the region's ever-flourishing literary culture and recognizes the ongoing evolution of the southern literary canon. As new writers draw upon and reshape previous traditions, southern literature has broadened and deepened its connections not just to the American literary mainstream but also to world literatures--a development thoughtfully explored in the essays here. Greatly expanding the content of the literature section in the original Encyclopedia, this volume includes 31 thematic essays addressing major genres of literature; theoretical categories, such as regionalism, the southern gothic, and agrarianism; and themes in southern writing, such as food, religion, and sexuality. Most striking is the fivefold increase in the number of biographical entries, which introduce southern novelists, playwrights, poets, and critics. Special attention is given to contemporary writers and other individuals who have not been widely covered in previous scholarship.
Posted in Reference

The New Urban Leaders

Author: Joyce A. Ladner

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 9780815798682

Category: Political Science

Page: 144

View: 3254

Some of today's best urban leaders don't work for the government—they can be found in nonprofit organizations that serve the working class and poor populations. Based on interviews conducted in major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, San Francisco, Washington D.C., and New York, this study focuses on exceptional leaders who have developed effective solutions to the complex problems of our inner cities, including education, economic development, and community safety. The book includes profiles of innovators such as Robert Woodson, founder of the Washington, D.C. based National Center for Neighborhood Enterprise, whose work on affordable housing, gang violence, and black entrepreneurship earned a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (the "genius" award); MacArthur Fellowship and Heinz Prize winner Bob Moses, founder of the Algebra Project that prepares low-income students for joining today's technology-dominated workforce; Rheedlen Center head Geoff Canada, who received the Heinz Prize for his "anti-violence among youth" work; and Reverend Eugene Rivers, one of the founders of the Ten-Point Coalition that helped to reduce gang violence in Boston. The New Urban Leadership investigates how and why expert problem solvers chose their career paths, what qualities make them especially successful in their work, and the methods they use to train the next generation of urban leaders.
Posted in Political Science

Current Biography Yearbook

Author: Maxine Block,Anna Herthe Rothe,Marjorie Dent Candee,Charles Moritz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography

Page: N.A

View: 1984

Posted in Biography

Many Minds, One Heart

SNCC's Dream for a New America

Author: Wesley C. Hogan

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807867896

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 1955

How did the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee break open the caste system in the American South between 1960 and 1965? In this innovative study, Wesley Hogan explores what SNCC accomplished and, more important, how it fostered significant social change in such a short time. She offers new insights into the internal dynamics of SNCC as well as the workings of the larger civil rights and Black Power movement of which it was a part. As Hogan chronicles, the members of SNCC created some of the civil rights movement's boldest experiments in freedom, including the sit-ins of 1960, the rejuvenated Freedom Rides of 1961, and grassroots democracy projects in Georgia and Mississippi. She highlights several key players--including Charles Sherrod, Bob Moses, and Fannie Lou Hamer--as innovators of grassroots activism and democratic practice. Breaking new ground, Hogan shows how SNCC laid the foundation for the emergence of the New Left and created new definitions of political leadership during the civil rights and Vietnam eras. She traces the ways other social movements--such as Black Power, women's liberation, and the antiwar movement--adapted practices developed within SNCC to apply to their particular causes. Many Minds, One Heart ultimately reframes the movement and asks us to look anew at where America stands on justice and equality today.
Posted in History

Wrestling with Moses

How Jane Jacobs Took On New York's Master Builder and Transformed the American City

Author: Anthony Flint

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1588368629

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 9642

The rivalry of Jane Jacobs and Robert Moses, a struggle for the soul of a city, is one of the most dramatic and consequential in modern American history. To a young Jane Jacobs, Greenwich Village, with its winding cobblestone streets and diverse makeup, was everything a city neighborhood should be. But consummate power broker Robert Moses, the father of many of New York’s most monumental development projects, thought neighborhoods like Greenwich Village were badly in need of “urban renewal.” Standing up against government plans for the city, Jacobs marshaled popular support and political power against Moses, whether to block traffic through her beloved Washington Square Park or to prevent the construction of the Lower Manhattan Expressway, an elevated superhighway that would have destroyed centuries-old streetscapes and displaced thousands of families. By confronting Moses and his vision, Jacobs forever changed the way Americans understood the city. Her story reminds us of the power we have as individuals to confront and defy reckless authority.
Posted in Social Science

Radical Equations

Civil Rights from Mississippi to the Algebra Project

Author: Robert Moses,Charles E. Cobb

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807031690

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 2085

At a time when popular solutions to the educational plight of poor children of color are imposed from the outside-national standards, high-stakes tests, charismatic individual saviors-the acclaimed Algebra Project and its founder, Robert Moses, offer a vision of school reform based in the power of communities. Begun in 1982, the Algebra Project is transforming math education in twenty-five cities. Founded on the belief that math-science literacy is a prerequisite for full citizenship in society, the Project works with entire communities-parents, teachers, and especially students-to create a culture of literacy around algebra, a crucial stepping-stone to college math and opportunity. Telling the story of this remarkable program, Robert Moses draws on lessons from the 1960s Southern voter registration he famously helped organize: 'Everyone said sharecroppers didn't want to vote. It wasn't until we got them demanding to vote that we got attention. Today, when kids are falling wholesale through the cracks, people say they don't want to learn. We have to get the kids themselves to demand what everyone says they don't want.' We see the Algebra Project organizing community by community. Older kids serve as coaches for younger students and build a self-sustained tradition of leadership. Teachers use innovative techniques. And we see the remarkable success stories of schools like the predominately poor Hart School in Bessemer, Alabama, which outscored the city's middle-class flagship school in just three years. Radical Equations provides a model for anyone looking for a community-based solution to the problems of our disadvantaged schools. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in Education

Educating for Insurgency

The Roles of Young People in Schools of Poverty

Author: Jay Gillen

Publisher: AK Press

ISBN: 1849352003

Category: Education

Page: 170

View: 8947

Education for Rebellion. A manifesto for today's broken schools.
Posted in Education

Conversations with Robert Stone

Author: William Heath

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496808940

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 7556

Ever since A Hall of Mirrors depicted the wild side of New Orleans in the 1960s, Robert Stone (1937–2015) has situated novels where America has shattered and the action is at a pitch. In Dog Soldiers, he covered the Vietnam War and drug smuggling. A Flag for Sunrise captured revolutionary discontent in Central America. Children of Light exposed the crass values of Hollywood. Outerbridge Reach depicted how existential angst can lead to a longing for heroic transcendence. The clash of religions in Jerusalem drove Damascus Gate. Traditional town-gown tensions amid twenty-first-century culture wars propelled Death of the Black-Haired Girl. Stone’s reputation rests on his mastery of the craft of fiction. These interviews are replete with insights about the creative process as he responds with disarming honesty to probing questions about his major works. Stone also has fascinating things to say about his remarkable life—a schizophrenic mother, a stint in the navy, his involvement with Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters, and his presence at the creation of the counterculture. From the publication of A Hall of Mirrors until his death in 2015, Stone was a major figure in American literature.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

William Wells and the Struggle for the Old Northwest

Author: William Heath

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 080615148X

Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Page: 520

View: 8596

Born to Anglo-American parents on the Appalachian frontier, captured by the Miami Indians at the age of thirteen, and adopted into the tribe, William Wells (1770–1812) moved between two cultures all his life but was comfortable in neither. Vilified by some historians for his divided loyalties, he remains relatively unknown even though he is worthy of comparison with such famous frontiersmen as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett. William Heath’s thoroughly researched book is the first biography of this man-in-the-middle. A servant of empire with deep sympathies for the people his country sought to dispossess, Wells married Chief Little Turtle’s daughter and distinguished himself as a Miami warrior, as an American spy, and as an Indian agent whose multilingual skills made him a valuable interpreter. Heath examines pioneer life in the Ohio Valley from both white and Indian perspectives, yielding rich insights into Wells’s career as well as broader events on the post-revolutionary American frontier, where Anglo-Americans pushing westward competed with the Indian nations of the Old Northwest for control of territory. Wells’s unusual career, Heath emphasizes, earned him a great deal of ill will. Because he warned the U.S. government against Tecumseh’s confederacy and the Tenskwatawa’s “religiously mad” followers, he was hated by those who supported the Shawnee leaders. Because he came to question treaties he had helped bring about, and cautioned the Indians about their harmful effects, he was distrusted by Americans. Wells is a complicated hero, and his conflicted position reflects the decline of coexistence and cooperation between two cultures.
Posted in BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Small Press

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Book industries and trade

Page: N.A

View: 2406

Posted in Book industries and trade

Literature

Author: M. Thomas Inge,Charles Reagan Wilson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780807858752

Category: History

Page: 511

View: 3675

Regionalism, sexuality, agrarianism, and southern gothic are some of the topics presented in this collection of thirty-one thematic essays written as a guide to understanding and appreciating Southern literature and its diverse influences. Simultaneous.
Posted in History

Miriam's Cup

A Passover Story

Author: Fran Manushkin

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

ISBN: 9780590677202

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 32

View: 7523

A Jewish mother preparing for Passover tells her young children the story of Miriam, the Biblical woman who prophesied the birth of Moses.
Posted in Juvenile Fiction

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture: Literature

Author: M. Thomas Inge,Charles Reagan Wilson,James G. Thomas (Jr.),Ann J. Abadie,University of Mississippi. Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 511

View: 7683

Rev. ed. of: Encyclopedia of Southern culture. 1991.
Posted in History

The Southern Register

The Newsletter of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, The University of Mississippi

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 5138

Posted in American literature

My Life with Bob

Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues

Author: Pamela Paul

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1627796320

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 8929

People Pick • O Magazine Title to Pick Up Now • Vanity Fair Hot Type • Glamour New Book You’re Guaranteed to Love This Summer • LitHub.com Best Book about Books • Buzzfeed Book You Need to Read This Summer • Seattle Times Book for Summer Reading • Warby Parker Blog Book Pick • Google Talks • Harper’s Bazaar • Vogue •The Washington Post • The Economist • The Christian Science Monitor • Salon • The Atlantic Imagine keeping a record of every book you’ve ever read. What would this reading trajectory say about you? With passion, humor, and insight, the editor of The New York Times Book Review shares the stories that have shaped her life. Pamela Paul has kept a single book by her side for twenty-eight years – carried throughout high school and college, hauled from Paris to London to Thailand, from job to job, safely packed away and then carefully removed from apartment to house to its current perch on a shelf over her desk – reliable if frayed, anonymous-looking yet deeply personal. This book has a name: Bob. Bob is Paul’s Book of Books, a journal that records every book she’s ever read, from Sweet Valley High to Anna Karenina, from Catch-22 to Swimming to Cambodia, a journey in reading that reflects her inner life – her fantasies and hopes, her mistakes and missteps, her dreams and her ideas, both half-baked and wholehearted. Her life, in turn, influences the books she chooses, whether for solace or escape, information or sheer entertainment. But My Life with Bob isn’t really about those books. It’s about the deep and powerful relationship between book and reader. It’s about the way books provide each of us the perspective, courage, companionship, and imperfect self-knowledge to forge our own path. It’s about why we read what we read and how those choices make us who we are. It’s about how we make our own stories.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Sing Out

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Music

Page: N.A

View: 5583

Posted in Music

Mississippi Freedom Summer

Author: John F. McClymer

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 247

View: 6117

Part of the American Stories series, this book tells the story of Mississippi during the "Freedom Summer" of 1964. The summer of 1964 witnessed the most astounding successes of the Civil Rights movement as well as the beginning of the dissolution of the political and social coalition that made those successes possible.
Posted in Education