The Burger Court

Counter-revolution Or Confirmation?

Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195122593

Category: Law

Page: 316

View: 5007

"Schwartz selected scholars, journalists, historians, and judges to present a view that is both composite and unique. From Garrow to Graglia, from Brennan to Bell, this book offers to practitioners, scholars, and jurists an examination of that most intriguing Court that separates the conflicting models of the Warren and Rehnquist benches."--Robert Henry
Posted in Law

The Rehnquist Court

A Retrospective

Author: Martin H. Belsky

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195148398

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 940

In 1986, the Supreme Court's leading conservative, William H. Rehnquist was made Chief Justice. Almost immediately, legal scholars, practitioners, and pundits began questioning what his influence would be, and whether he would remake US constitutional corpus in his own image. This collected volume gathers together a distinguished group of scholars, journalists, judges, and practitioners to reflect on the fifteen-year impact of the Rehnquist Court.
Posted in History

Brown v. Board of Education

A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy

Author: James T. Patterson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199880840

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4106

2004 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Supreme Court's unanimous decision to end segregation in public schools. Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racial segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, moving narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its fifty-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shepherded a fractured Court to a unanimous decision. Others include segregationist politicians like Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas; Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Nixon; and controversial Supreme Court justices such as William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. Most Americans still see Brown as a triumph--but was it? Patterson shrewdly explores the provocative questions that still swirl around the case. Could the Court--or President Eisenhower--have done more to ensure compliance with Brown? Did the decision touch off the modern civil rights movement? How useful are court-ordered busing and affirmative action against racial segregation? To what extent has racial mixing affected the academic achievement of black children? Where indeed do we go from here to realize the expectations of Marshall, Ellison, and others in 1954?
Posted in History

The Burger Court

The Counter-revolution that Wasn't

Author: Vincent Blasi

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300036206

Category: Political Science

Page: 326

View: 9340

Discusses rulings of the Burger Court on freedom of the press, freedom of speech, poor people's rights, criminal investigation, family law, race discrimination, sex discrimination, labor law, antitrust law, etc.
Posted in Political Science

The Vinson Court

Justices, Rulings, and Legacy

Author: Michal R. Belknap

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1576072010

Category: Law

Page: 290

View: 3878

Spanning the years from 1946 until 1953, the Vinson Court made the legal transition from World War II to the Korean War, and the outspoken justices Felix Frankfurter and Hugo Black helped shape its legacy. * Four narrative chapters on the justices, decisions, and legacy of the Vinson Court * 12 photographs and biographies of the justices who served on the Vinson Court
Posted in Law

The Burger Court

Justices, Rulings, and Legacy

Author: Tinsley E. Yarbrough

Publisher: Abc-Clio Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 346

View: 8574

Explores the era, justices, key events, and decisions in landmark Supreme Court cases, and examines the impact of the Court under Chief Justic William Burger on religious liberty, civil liberties, abortion, and criminal justice.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Supreme Court

an essential history

Author: Peter Charles Hoffer,Williamjames Hoffer,N. E. H. Hull

Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 491

View: 7469

A definitive history of the U.S. Supreme Court details the evolution of the legal institution from the early days of the American Republic to the present day, offering profiles of the justices, the Court's years under each Chief Justice, its influence on American life, and the issues, cases, and decisions they handled from the perspective of the time in which they came before the Court.
Posted in Law

Mapp versus Ohio

Author: Carolyn Nestor Long

Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 228

View: 733

Although she came to be known as merely "that girl with the dirty books," Dollree Mapp was a poor but proud black woman who defied a predominantly white police force by challenging the legality of its search-and-seizure methods. Her case, which went all the way to the Supreme Court, remains hotly debated and highly controversial today. In 1957, Cleveland police raided Mapp's home on a tip--from future fight promoter Don "the Kid" King--that they'd find evidence linked to a recent bombing. What they confiscated instead was sexually explicit material that led to Mapp's conviction for possessing "lewd and lascivious books"--a conviction that initially pitted Ohio police and judges against Mapp and the American Civil Liberties Union. At stake was not only the search-and-seizure question but also the "exclusionary rule" concerning the use of evidence not specified in a search warrant. Carolyn Long follows the police raid into Mapp's home and then chronicles the events that led to the Court's 5-4 ruling in Mapp v. Ohio (1961), which redefined the rights of the accused and set strict limits on how police could obtain and use evidence. Long traces the case through the legal labyrinth, discusses the controversies it created, and assesses its impact on police behavior, as well as subsequent prosecutions and convictions of the accused. She also analyzes Justice Tom Clark's creative use of Mapp's case to overturn Wolf v. Colorado, which had ruled that the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable searches applied only to federal law, and presents Justice John Harlan's strong federalist-based dissent. As entertaining as it is informative, Long's book features a host of intriguingcharacters: Mapp, he seasoned and determined attorney, A. L. Kearns, and police sergeant Carl Delau, among others. Combined with her concise and insightful explanations of key legal principles--including the exclusionary rule itself--Long's deft narrate provides an ideal format for teachers and students in criminology, legal history, constitutional law, and political science, as well as anyone who loves a good story. The Mapp case is still much debated, especially in light of the recent reauthorization of the U.S. Patriot Act and the free rain given to law enforcement officers in matters of search and seizure. Long's compelling study thus poses important questions regarding privacy and individual rights that still matter today, even as it also illuminates one of the keystones of the Warren Court's criminal procedure revolution.
Posted in Law

Supreme Court of the United States

A Bibliography

Author: George H. Rutland

Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 227

View: 5232

Although not as glamourous as the Presidency and not as raucous as Congress, the Supreme Court quietly wields more power and influence over life in the United States than the other two combined. There is not a facet of life in the US that the Supreme Court is not called upon sooner or later to offer an opinion about. This bibliography gathers important literature about the Supreme Court and provides access through subject groupings as well as author and subject indexes. Contents: General; History; Separation of Powers; Constitutional Law; Freedom of Religion; Judicial Process; Civil Rights; Justices; Freedoms; Judicial Power and Indexes.
Posted in Law

Coining Corruption

The Making of the American Campaign Finance System

Author: Kurt Hohenstein

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780875803777

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 4324

In the wake of Watergate, Congress passed the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) in an effort to prevent the corruption of future elections. The U.S. Supreme Court, in Buckley v. Valeo (1976), defined corruption as quid pro quo—“get for giving”—meaning Congress could only regulate the kind of corruption that had occurred if a campaign contributor received political favors from the candidate. This definition has since shaped and limited efforts at campaign finance reform, often with ironic and unintended consequences. By shifting the focus to the source and amount of contributions, the justices in the Buckley decision ignored disparities in funding and the resulting ability of particular candidates to dominate communication channels. In Coining Corruption, legal and political historian Kurt Hohenstein provides a hitherto untold story about the successes and limitations of political reform. From 1876 until 1976, lawmakers and courts permitted regulation that potentially infringed upon freedom of speech: they understood corruption as the conversion of economic power into political power. In their view, corruption existed if a candidate's unfettered campaign spending overwhelmed other voices and limited real deliberation. Yet, as Hohenstein shows, Buckley's limited “quid pro quo” definition ignores these considerations. Following the evolution of the campaign finance system through the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2001 and the Supreme Court's decisions in McConnell v. FEC (2001) and Landell v. Sorrell (2006), Hohenstein calls for a return to a broad, historical understanding of corruption. American democracy demands regulation of the sources and amounts of campaign funding in order to prevent a monopoly on the vehicles of political debate. Those interested in reform politics, public policy, constitutional history, and Congress will appreciate this groundbreaking study.
Posted in History

Queen's Court

Judicial Power in the Rehnquist Era

Author: Nancy Maveety

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 194

View: 2474

The first book to challenge the conventional wisdom that Sandra Day O'Connor was an influential member of the Rehnquist Court simply by default of her centrist views. Shows that her impact and influence went far beyond the "swing vote," and that it truly was "O'Connor's Court" more so than Rehnquist's.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives

Author: Kenneth T. Jackson

Publisher: Charles Scribners & Sons

ISBN: 9780684806440

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 649

View: 2649

Includes persons who made significant contributions while living in the United States, whether or not they were U.S. citizens, and who died in the five-year period covered by each volume. Includes an index by occupation.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The ascent of pragmatism

the Burger Court in action

Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 482

View: 7629

Examines the Supreme Court's major decisions under Chief Justice Warren Burger, and argues that Burger failed to exert effective leadership over a Court split into three wings, with a pragmatic center working toward compromise
Posted in Philosophy

Milestone Documents of American Leaders-Volume 1

Author: Paul Finkelman,James A. Percoco

Publisher: Schlager Group Inc

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 525

View: 1707

The second title in the ground-breaking Milestone Document series, this new set pairs primary source texts with expert analysis by esteemed historians. Milestone Documents of American Leaders features important full-text sources written by presidents, jurists, legislators and other influential people who helped shape the nation.
Posted in History

The Oxford guide to the United States government

Author: John J. Patrick,Richard M. Pious,Donald A. Ritchie

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195142730

Category: History

Page: 802

View: 1770

Entries offer profiles of United States presidents, vice presidents, Supreme Court justices, and other significant figures, and information on elections, legislation, Supreme Court decisions, and major issues.
Posted in History

The Oklahoma Bar Journal

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Bar associations

Page: N.A

View: 5359

Posted in Bar associations

The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement

The Battle for Control of the Law

Author: Steven M. Teles

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400829699

Category: Law

Page: 368

View: 6778

Starting in the 1970s, conservatives learned that electoral victory did not easily convert into a reversal of important liberal accomplishments, especially in the law. As a result, conservatives' mobilizing efforts increasingly turned to law schools, professional networks, public interest groups, and the judiciary--areas traditionally controlled by liberals. Drawing from internal documents, as well as interviews with key conservative figures, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement examines this sometimes fitful, and still only partially successful, conservative challenge to liberal domination of the law and American legal institutions. Unlike accounts that depict the conservatives as fiendishly skilled, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement reveals the formidable challenges that conservatives faced in competing with legal liberalism. Steven Teles explores how conservative mobilization was shaped by the legal profession, the legacy of the liberal movement, and the difficulties in matching strategic opportunities with effective organizational responses. He explains how foundations and groups promoting conservative ideas built a network designed to dislodge legal liberalism from American elite institutions. And he portrays the reality, not of a grand strategy masterfully pursued, but of individuals and political entrepreneurs learning from trial and error. Using previously unavailable materials from the Olin Foundation, Federalist Society, Center for Individual Rights, Institute for Justice, and Law and Economics Center, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement provides an unprecedented look at the inner life of the conservative movement. Lawyers, historians, sociologists, political scientists, and activists seeking to learn from the conservative experience in the law will find it compelling reading.
Posted in Law

The Rehnquist Court

Justices, Rulings, and Legacy

Author: Thomas R. Hensley,Kathleen Hale,Carl Snook

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1576072002

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 443

View: 3582

Highlights: - Provides an analysis of the major conservative changes in U.S. constitutional law during the Rehnquist Court- Analyzes the Rehnquist Court's voting record and the lasting impacts of those votes
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Choice

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

View: 8763

Posted in Academic libraries