The Black Farm

Author: Elias Witherow

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781945796500

Category: Fiction

Page: 324

View: 4231

After the loss of a child along with a slew of agonizing misfortunes, Nick and Jess decide to end their lives. But nothing could prepare him for the nightmares he found...nothing could prepare him for The Black Farm.
Posted in Fiction

Farm population of the United States

Author: United States. Bureau of the Census,United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service,United States. Dept. of Agriculture,United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service,United States. Dept. of Commerce

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 2947

Posted in Social Science

Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency, 1930-1970

Author: Doug McAdam

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226555522

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2535

In this classic work of sociology, Doug McAdam presents a political-process model that explains the rise and decline of the black protest movement in the United States. Moving from theoretical concerns to empirical analysis, he focuses on the crucial role of three institutions that foster protest: black churches, black colleges, and Southern chapters of the NAACP. He concludes that political opportunities, a heightened sense of political efficacy, and the development of these three institutions played a central role in shaping the civil rights movement. In his new introduction, McAdam revisits the civil rights struggle in light of recent scholarship on social movement origins and collective action. "[A] first-rate analytical demonstration that the civil rights movement was the culmination of a long process of building institutions in the black community."—Raymond Wolters, Journal of American History "A fresh, rich, and dynamic model to explain the rise and decline of the black insurgency movement in the United States."—James W. Lamare, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Posted in History

Current Population Reports: Farm Population

Author: United States. Bureau of the Census,United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9609

Posted in

On the Road for Work

Migratory Workers on the East Coast of the United States

Author: G. Thomas-Lycklama-Nijeholt

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400987579

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 212

View: 8119

Migratory farm workers provide the extra hands that are so badly needed during the planting and harvest season in the United States. Although these workers have been essential to the American agricultural system for more than a hundred years, our knowledge of them is limited and quite fragmentary; it can be divided roughly into two types of information. On the one hand, we have the statistical data collected by various censuses and the data gathered by agricultural econ omists to study the supply of and demand for farm labor. The economic aspects of farm labor generally predominate in such material. On the other, we have the scientific studies and journalistic descriptions that report on migratory farm by using a qualitative approach. The social scientists and journalists who workers have compiled these reports lived in the labor camps and have vividly described the dismal and oppressive conditions these workers must endure. The drawback of the first type of data is that its orientation to economic problems makes it too superficial and one-sided. It fails to interrelate the diverse economic factors affecting the lives and work of all farm workers, and conse quently presents a distorted and incomplete picture of migratory farm worker life. Also, because the migratory farm workers are quite elusive and usually keep a low profIle, they are often underrepresented in such data. The data gathered by using qualitative methods have the major disadvantage of being quite limited in scope.
Posted in Business & Economics

America in Black and White

One Nation, Indivisible

Author: Stephan Thernstrom,Abigail Thernstrom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439129098

Category: Social Science

Page: 704

View: 4573

In a book destined to become a classic, Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom present important new information about the positive changes that have been achieved and the measurable improvement in the lives of the majority of African-Americans. Supporting their conclusions with statistics on education, earnings, and housing, they argue that the perception of serious racial divisions in this country is outdated -- and dangerous.
Posted in Social Science

Reaping a Greater Harvest

African Americans, the Extension Service, and Rural Reform in Jim Crow Texas

Author: Debra A. Reid

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585445714

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 9456

Jim Crow laws pervaded the south, reaching from the famous "separate yet equal" facilities to voting discrimination to the seats on buses. Agriculture, a key industry for those southern blacks trying to forge an independent existence, was not immune to the touch of racism, prejudice, and inequality. In Reaping a Greater Harvest, Debra Reid deftly spotlights the hierarchies of race, class, and gender within the extension service. Black farmers were excluded from cooperative demonstration work in Texas until the Smith-Lever Agricultural Extension act in 1914. However, the resulting Negro Division included a complicated bureaucracy of African American agents who reported to white officials, were supervised by black administrators, and served black farmers. The now-measurable successes of these African American farmers exacerbated racial tensions and led to pressure on agents to maintain the status quo. The bureau that was meant to ensure equality instead became another tool for systematic discrimination and maintenance of the white-dominated southern landscape. Historians of race, gender, and class have joined agricultural historians in roundly praising Reid's work.
Posted in History

Dominant Impressions

Essays on the Canadian Short Story

Author: Gerald Lynch,Angela Robbeson

Publisher: University of Ottawa Press

ISBN: 0776605054

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 168

View: 7720

Canadian critics and scholars, along with a growing number from around the world, have long recognized the achievements of Canadian short story writers. However, these critics have tended to view the Canadian short story as a historically recent phenomenon. This reappraisal corrects this mistaken view by exploring the literary and cultural antecedents of the Canadian short story.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Plantation Society and Race Relations

The Origins of Inequality

Author: Thomas J. Durant,J. David Knottnerus

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275958084

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 6976

Analyzes the social organization of slave plantations and its influence on race relations and social inequality in Southern plantation society and in today's America.
Posted in Social Science

Institutional Constraints to Small Farmer Development in Southern Africa

Author: Ajuruchukwu Obi

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9086867049

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 7666

The Southern Africa region has experienced more than its fair share of problems in recent years. Just when it seemed that the hardships wrought by the devastating cycle of droughts and floods of 2000 to 2002 were a thing of the past, other problems emerged. At one level, there have been the weak and often erratic governance mechanisms and political crises in some countries of the region, leading to severe disruptions in agricultural production to the point that supplies and markets have virtually disappeared. At another level, socio-cultural rigidities have often militated against the adoption of efficient farming practices, resulting in sub-optimal choices that lock smallholders into a low equilibrium trap. In the face of the disappearing supplies and missing markets, these have engendered hyper-inflationary trends of a magnitude unknown anywhere else in the world. But in the midst of all this apparent dreariness, cases are emerging from which immense lessons can be drawn. This book assembles a collection of research papers based on studies completed in 2008 and 2009 in Southern Africa that examine various dimensions of the institutional constraints small farmers are facing in the region and how they are going about dealing with them. The papers draw from these diverse and polar experiences and present some theoretical and practical insights that should form the basis for more in-depth, country-level, sector-specific analyses, focusing mainly on citrus, horticultures, cotton and livestock. The thematic issues of income inequality, land reform, natural resource management and value chain governance and chain choice, are covered in this book and are expected to be of interest for a wide constituency, including researchers, development practitioners, rural animators, and policy makers.
Posted in Science

One Kind of Freedom

The Economic Consequences of Emancipation

Author: Roger L. Ransom,Richard Sutch

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521795500

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 458

View: 976

This economic history classic examines the economic institutions that replaced slavery.
Posted in Business & Economics

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 11: Agriculture and Industry

Author: Melissa Walker,James C. Cobb

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469616688

Category: Reference

Page: 376

View: 7365

Volume 11 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture examines the economic culture of the South by pairing two categories that account for the ways many southerners have made their living. In the antebellum period, the wealth of southern whites came largely from agriculture that relied on the forced labor of enslaved blacks. After Reconstruction, the South became attractive to new industries lured by the region's ongoing commitment to low-wage labor and management-friendly economic policies. Throughout the volume, articles reflect the breadth and variety of southern life, paying particular attention to the region's profound economic transformation in recent decades. The agricultural section consists of 25 thematic entries that explore issues such as Native American agricultural practices, plantations, and sustainable agriculture. Thirty-eight shorter pieces cover key crops of the region--from tobacco to Christmas trees--as well as issues of historic and emerging interest--from insects and insecticides to migrant labor. The section on industry and commerce contains 13 thematic entries in which contributors address topics such as the economic impact of military bases, resistance to industrialization, and black business. Thirty-six topical entries explore particular industries, such as textiles, timber, automobiles, and banking, as well as individuals--including Henry W. Grady and Sam M. Walton--whose ideas and enterprises have helped shape the modern South.
Posted in Reference

Mama Learned Us to Work

Farm Women in the New South

Author: Lu Ann Jones

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 080786207X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9234

Farm women of the twentieth-century South have been portrayed as oppressed, worn out, and isolated. Lu Ann Jones tells quite a different story in Mama Learned Us to Work. Building upon evocative oral histories, she encourages us to understand these women as consumers, producers, and agents of economic and cultural change. As consumers, farm women bargained with peddlers at their backdoors. A key business for many farm women was the "butter and egg trade--small-scale dairying and raising chickens. Their earnings provided a crucial margin of economic safety for many families during the 1920s and 1930s and offered women some independence from their men folks. These innovative women showed that poultry production paid off and laid the foundation for the agribusiness poultry industry that emerged after World War II. Jones also examines the relationships between farm women and home demonstration agents and the effect of government-sponsored rural reform. She discusses the professional culture that developed among white agents as they reconciled new and old ideas about women's roles and shows that black agents, despite prejudice, linked their clients to valuable government resources and gave new meanings to traditions of self-help, mutual aid, and racial uplift.
Posted in History

Demography of the Black Population in the United States

An Annotated Bibliography with a Review Essay

Author: Jamshid A. Momeni

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: N.A

Category: Reference

Page: 354

View: 2047

Product information not available.
Posted in Reference

The Color of Wealth

The Story Behind the U.S. Racial Wealth Divide

Author: Barbara Robles,Betsy Leondar-Wright,Rose Brewer

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585621

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 7556

For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.
Posted in Business & Economics

Westmoreland County

Author: Cassandra Burton

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738506074

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 325

With the advent of national franchises and increased commercial development throughout Virginia, fewer and fewer areas are able to maintain their agrarian nature. However, Westmoreland County continues its long tradition of relying on its unique environment for sustenance, with its fertile farmlands and its bountiful rivers and creeks, thus preserving its rural essence.
Posted in History

Let Them Work

The Freedmen's Bureau Labor Contracts of Franklin County, Tennessee

Author: Mary Osweiler Powers

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1469107538

Category: History

Page: 183

View: 6932

There is no available information at this time.
Posted in History

Justice at War

Civil Liberties and Civil Rights During Times of Crisis

Author: Richard Delgado

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814744052

Category: Law

Page: 219

View: 3684

The status of civil rights in the United States today is as volatile an issue as ever, with many Americans wondering if new laws, implemented after the events of September 11, restrict more people than they protect. How will efforts to eradicate racism, sexism, and xenophobia be affected by the measures our government takes in the name of protecting its citizens? Richard Delgado, one of the founding figures in the Critical Race Theory movement, addresses these problems with his latest book in the award-winning Rodrigo Chronicles. Employing the narrative device he and other Critical Race theorists made famous, Delgado assembles a cast of characters to discuss such urgent and timely topics as race, terrorism, hate speech, interracial relationships, freedom of speech, and new theories on civil rights stemming from the most recent war. In the course of this new narrative, Delgado provides analytical breakthroughs, offering new civil rights theories, new approaches to interracial romance and solidarity, and a fresh analysis of how whiteness and white privilege figure into the debate on affirmative action. The characters also discuss the black/white binary paradigm of race and show why it persists even at a time when the country's population is rapidly diversifying.
Posted in Law

The Demography of African Americans 1930–1990

Author: S.H. Preston,I.T. Elo,Mark E. Hill,Ira Rosenwaike

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401703256

Category: Social Science

Page: 214

View: 8969

The authors of this work use a novel strategy that combines record linkage and demographic/statistical analysis to produce an internally consistent and robust set of estimates of the African-American population during the period 1930-1990. They interpret the record that emerges, with special reference to longevity trends and differentials. This work is for demographers, sociologists and students of ethnic studies.
Posted in Social Science