The American West in the Nineteenth Century

255 Illustrations from "Harper's Weekly" and Other Contemporary Sources

Author: John Grafton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780486273044

Category: Design

Page: 199

View: 4928

Compelling pictorial history from actual newspaper and magazine accounts recreates vast saga of Western settlement and expansion: hunting, mining, railroading, cowboys and cattle, army life and Indian wars, much more. Extensive, informative captions.
Posted in Design

Nature's Noblemen

Transatlantic Masculinities and the Nineteenth-Century American West

Author: Monica Rico

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300136064

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 7450

DIV In this fascinating book Monica Rico explores the myth of the American West in the nineteenth century as a place for men to assert their masculinity by “roughing it� in the wilderness and reveals how this myth played out in a transatlantic context. Rico uncovers the networks of elite men—British and American—who circulated between the West and the metropoles of London and New York. Each chapter tells the story of an individual who, by traveling these transatlantic paths, sought to resolve anxieties about class, gender, and empire in an era of profound economic and social transformation. All of the men Rico discusses—from the well known, including Theodore Roosevelt and Buffalo Bill Cody, to the comparatively obscure, such as English cattle rancher Moreton Frewen—envisioned the American West as a global space into which redemptive narratives of heroic upper-class masculinity could be written. /div
Posted in History

The Opium Debate and Chinese Exclusion Laws in the Nineteenth-century American West

Author: Diana L. Ahmad

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN: 9780874176988

Category: History

Page: 132

View: 6228

America's current struggle with drug addiction is not the nation's first. In the mid-nineteenth century, opium-smoking was decried as a major social and public health problem, especially in the West. Although China faced its own epidemic of opium addiction, only a very small minority of Chinese immigrants in America were actually involved in the opium business. It was in Anglo communities that the use of opium soon spread and this growing use was deemed a threat to the nation's entrepreneurial spirit and to its growing importance as a world economic and military power. The Opium Debate and Chinese Exclusion Laws examines how the spread of opium-smoking fueled racism and created demands for the removal of the Chinese from American life. This meticulously researched study of the nineteenth-century drug-abuse crisis reveals the ways moral crusaders linked their anti-opium rhetoric to already active demands for Chinese exclusion.
Posted in History

Gunsmoke and Saddle Leather

Firearms in the Nineteenth-century American West

Author: Charles G. Worman

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826335937

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 522

View: 1591

The gun, like the axe and the plow, was an essential tool in the exploration and settlement of the trans-Mississippi West. It provided food for the cooking pot as well as protection against two- or four-legged marauders. As the century progressed, firearms also provided various forms of recreation for both men and women, primarily target and competition shooting. Of course the employment of the gun, whether for good or evil, depended upon the user. The men and women who lived the nineteenth-century western experience sometimes described in detail the role firearms played in their lives. Such accounts included a trapper in the 1830s, a woman crossing the plains by wagon in the 1850s, a drover ("cowboy" in modern terminology) enduring the dangers of a long cattle drive, a professional hunter engaged in the slaughter of the once seemingly endless herds of bison, or a soldier campaigning against American Indians. Each account adds to our knowledge of firearms and our awareness of the struggle faced by those who were a part of the western experience. Gunsmoke and Saddle Leather describes the gun's impact on the lives of those in the West--men and women, whites and American Indians--using their own words to tell that story wherever possible.
Posted in Antiques & Collectibles

Jews on the Frontier

Religion and Mobility in Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Shari Rabin

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479869856

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 7548

An engaging history of how Jews forged their own religious culture on the American frontier Jews on the Frontier offers a religious history that begins in an unexpected place: on the road. Shari Rabin recounts the journey of Jewish people as they left Eastern cities and ventured into the American West and South during the nineteenth century. It brings to life the successes and obstacles of these travels, from the unprecedented economic opportunities to the anonymity and loneliness that complicated the many legal obligations of traditional Jewish life. Without government-supported communities or reliable authorities, where could one procure kosher meat? Alone in the American wilderness, how could one find nine co-religionists for a minyan (prayer quorum)? Without identity documents, how could one really know that someone was Jewish? Rabin argues that Jewish mobility during this time was pivotal to the development of American Judaism. In the absence of key institutions like synagogues or charitable organizations which had played such a pivotal role in assimilating East Coast immigrants, ordinary Jews on the frontier created religious life from scratch, expanding and transforming Jewish thought and practice. Jews on the Frontier vividly recounts the story of a neglected era in American Jewish history, offering a new interpretation of American religions, rooted not in congregations or denominations, but in the politics and experiences of being on the move. This book shows that by focusing on everyday people, we gain a more complete view of how American religion has taken shape. This book follows a group of dynamic and diverse individuals as they searched for resources for stability, certainty, and identity in a nation where there was little to be found.
Posted in History

Black Cowboys in the American West

On the Range, on the Stage, Behind the Badge

Author: Bruce A. Glasrud,Michael N. Searles

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806156503

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1104

Who were the black cowboys? They were drovers, foremen, fiddlers, cowpunchers, cattle rustlers, cooks, and singers. They worked as wranglers, riders, ropers, bulldoggers, and bronc busters. They came from varied backgrounds—some grew up in slavery, while free blacks often got their start in Texas and Mexico. Most who joined the long trail drives were men, but black women also rode and worked on western ranches and farms. The first overview of the subject in more than fifty years, Black Cowboys in the American West surveys the life and work of these cattle drivers from the years before the Civil War through the turn of the twentieth century. Including both classic, previously published articles and exciting new research, this collection also features select accounts of twentieth-century rodeos, music, people, and films. Arranged in three sections—“Cowboys on the Range,” “Performing Cowboys,” and “Outriders of the Black Cowboys”—the thirteen chapters illuminate the great diversity of the black cowboy experience. Like all ranch hands and riders, African American cowboys lived hard, dangerous lives. But black drovers were expected to do the roughest, most dangerous work—and to do it without complaint. They faced discrimination out west, albeit less than in the South, which many had left in search of autonomy and freedom. As cowboys, they could escape the brutal violence visited on African Americans in many southern communities and northern cities. Black cowhands remain an integral part of life in the West, the descendants of African Americans who ventured west and helped settle and establish black communities. This long-overdue examination of nineteenth- and twentieth-century black cowboys ensures that they, and their many stories and experiences, will continue to be known and told.
Posted in History

Manifest Destinations

Cities and Tourists in the Nineteenth-Century American West

Author: J. Philip Gruen

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806147326

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 312

View: 3459

In Manifest Destinations, J. Philip Gruen examines the ways in which tourists experienced Chicago, Denver, Salt Lake City, and San Francisco between 1869 and 1893, a period of rapid urbanization and accelerated modernity. Gruen pays particular attention to the contrast between the way these cities were promoted and the way visitors actually experienced them.
Posted in Business & Economics

The American Adam

Author: R. W. B. Lewis

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022621950X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 9735

Intellectual history is viewed in this book as a series of "great conversations"—dramatic dialogues in which a culture's spokesmen wrestle with the leading questions of their times. In nineteenth-century America the great argument centered about De Crèvecoeur's "new man," the American, an innocent Adam in a bright new world dissociating himself from the historic past. Mr. Lewis reveals this vital preoccupation as a pervasive, transforming ingredient of the American mind, illuminating history and theology as well as art, shaping the consciousness of lesser thinkers as fully as it shaped the giants of the age. He traces the Adamic theme in the writings of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Henry James, and others, and in an Epilogue he exposes their continuing spirit in the works of F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Ralph Ellison, J. D. Salinger, and Saul Bellow.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Empires, Nations, and Families

A History of the North American West, 1800-1860

Author: Anne Farrar Hyde

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803224052

Category: History

Page: 628

View: 8604

To most people living in the West, the Louisiana Purchase made little difference: the United States was just another imperial overlord to be assessed and manipulated. This was not, as Empires, Nations, and Families makes clear, virgin wilderness discovered by virtuous Anglo entrepreneurs. Rather, the United States was a newcomer in a place already complicated by vying empires. This book documents the broad family associations that crossed national and ethnic lines and that, along with the river systems of the trans-Mississippi West, formed the basis for a global trade in furs that had operated for hundreds of years before the land became part of the United States. ø Empires, Nations, and Families shows how the world of river and maritime trade effectively shifted political power away from military and diplomatic circles into the hands of local people. Tracing family stories from the Canadian North to the Spanish and Mexican borderlands and from the Pacific Coast to the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, Anne F. Hyde?s narrative moves from the earliest years of the Indian trade to the Mexican War and the gold rush era. Her work reveals how, in the 1850s, immigrants to these newest regions of the United States violently wrested control from Native and other powers, and how conquest and competing demands for land and resources brought about a volatile frontier culture?not at all the peace and prosperity that the new power had promised.
Posted in History

Oh What a Slaughter

Massacres in the American West: 1846--1890

Author: Larry McMurtry

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439141496

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 4797

A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.
Posted in History

Violence over the Land

Indians and Empires in the Early American West

Author: Ned BLACKHAWK

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020995

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 8496

"Blackhawk, a Western Shoshone himself, does not portray the natives as victims. Instead, he demonstrates that their perseverance and ability to adapt to changing conditions over the last two centuries allowed them to help shape the world around them ... This is one of the finest studies available on native peoples of the ggreat basin region." John Burch, Library Journal, from the bookjacket.
Posted in History

Life of a Soldier on the Western Frontier

Author: Jeremy Agnew

Publisher: Mountain Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 9206

Focusing on the Indian Wars period of the 1840s through the 1890s, Life of a Soldier on the Western Frontier captures the daily challenges faced by the typical enlisted man and explores the role soldiers played in the conquering of the American frontier.
Posted in History

The Railroad and the State

War, Politics, and Technology in Nineteenth-century America

Author: Robert G. Angevine

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804742399

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 6707

This book examines the complex and changing relationship between the U.S. Army and American railroads during the nineteenth century.
Posted in History

The American West

A Very Short Introduction

Author: Stephen Aron

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199858934

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 9631

Part geographical location, part time period, and part state of mind, the American West is a concept often invoked but rarely defined. Though popular culture has carved out a short and specific time and place for the region, author and longtime Californian Stephen Aron tracks "the West" from the building of the Cahokia Mounds around 900 AD to the post-World War II migration to California. His Very Short Introduction stretches the chronology, enlarges the geography, and varies the casting, providing a history of the American West that is longer, larger, and more complicated than popular culture has previously suggested. It is a history of how portions of North America became Wests, how parts of these became American, and how ultimately American Wests became the American West. Aron begins by describing the expansion of Indian North America in the centuries before and during its early encounters with Europeans. He then explores the origins of American westward expansion from the Seven Years' War to the 1830s, focusing on the western frontier at the time: the territory between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River. He traces the narrative - temporally and geographically - through the discovery of gold in California in the mid-nineteenth century and the subsequent rush to the Pacific Slope. He shows how the passage of the Newlands Reclamation Act in 1902 brought an unprecedented level of federal control to the region, linking the West more closely to the rest of the United States, and how World War II brought a new rush of population (particularly to California), further raising the federal government's profile in the region and heightening the connections between the West and the wider world. Authoritative, lucid, and ranging widely over issues of environment, people, and identity, this is the American West stripped of its myths. The complex convergence of peoples, polities, and cultures that has decisively shaped the history of the American West serves as the key interpretive thread through this Very Short Introduction. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Posted in History

Cadillac Desert

The American West and Its Disappearing Water, Revised Edition

Author: Marc Reisner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440672828

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 672

View: 4806

"The definitive work on the West's water crisis." --Newsweek The story of the American West is the story of a relentless quest for a precious resource: water. It is a tale of rivers diverted and dammed, of political corruption and intrigue, of billion-dollar battles over water rights, of ecological and economic disaster. In his landmark book, Cadillac Desert, Marc Reisner writes of the earliest settlers, lured by the promise of paradise, and of the ruthless tactics employed by Los Angeles politicians and business interests to ensure the city's growth. He documents the bitter rivalry between two government giants, the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in the competition to transform the West. Based on more than a decade of research, Cadillac Desert is a stunning expose and a dramatic, intriguing history of the creation of an Eden--an Eden that may only be a mirage. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in Technology & Engineering

The Bone Hunters

The Heroic Age of Paleontology in the American West

Author: Url Lanham

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486144445

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7020

DIVLucid nontechnical study recalls astounding 19th-century fossil discoveries of dinosaurs, other prehistoric animals. 51 halftones. /div
Posted in History

Daily Life on the Nineteenth Century American Frontier

Author: Mary Ellen Jones

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313296345

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 6607

This comprehensive social history of the westward movement explores the details of everyday living on the American frontier.
Posted in History

Virgin Land

The American West as Symbol and Myth

Author: Henry Nash Smith,Roger Chartier,Phillippe Aria]s,Georges Duby,Arthur Goldhammer

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674939554

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 3331

Examines the significance and impact of the nineteenth-century Westward movement on American literature. Bibliogs
Posted in History

The Significance of the Frontier in American History

Author: Frederick Jackson Turner

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 014196331X

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 1081

This hugely influential work marked a turning point in US history and culture, arguing that the nation’s expansion into the Great West was directly linked to its unique spirit: a rugged individualism forged at the juncture between civilization and wilderness, which – for better or worse – lies at the heart of American identity today. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves – and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives – and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.
Posted in History

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

An Indian History of the American West

Author: Dee Brown

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453274146

Category: History

Page: 494

View: 6952

The “fascinating” #1 New York Times bestseller that awakened the world to the destruction of American Indians in the nineteenth-century West (The Wall Street Journal). First published in 1970, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs—from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse—who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture. Forcefully written and meticulously researched, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee inspired a generation to take a second look at how the West was won. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
Posted in History