The American Farmer

A Complete Agricultural Library, with Useful Facts for the Household ...

Author: Charles Louis Flint

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 1154

Posted in Agriculture

Letters from an American Farmer

Author: J. Crèvecoeur

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 1429000112

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 1644

First published in England in 1782, Crevecoeur's Letters from an American Farmer was one of the first works to describe the character of the average American at the close of the Revolutionary War. His famous question, ""What, then, is the American, this new man?"", summarized the European's interest in and questioning of the new country of America at a time when centuries of tradition had just been overturned and post-colonial Americans were attempting to describe themselves in a new way. Through the character of James, the letters celebrate the land of America, its space and fertility, and the character of Americans themselves, their work ethic and spirit of personal determination. The Letters also look at the darker side of American life, particularly the issue of slavery. The discussions of American identity, participation in war (or not), and the perception of immigrants and their ethnicity make this book as relevant to our understanding of ourselves today as it was in 1782.
Posted in History

More Letters from the American Farmer

An Edition of the Essays in English Left Unpublished by Crèvecoeur

Author: J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820315997

Category: History

Page: 490

View: 9697

This is a critical edition of the essays that J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur (1735-1813) wrote in English but did not include in Letters from an American Farmer. First published in 1782, Letters from an American Farmer is an eighteenth-century cultural masterpiece. Written in English by a French-born immigrant, it is a collection of semiautobiographical writings in epistolary form that describe daily life along the northern frontier during the days leading up to the American Revolution. Conveying the attitudes, beliefs, aspirations, and conflicting loyalties of common settlers, Letters has helped subsequent generations to grasp the ethos of a nascent America. More than a century after Crevecoeur's death, three bound manuscript volumes surfaced that included not only the original handwritten texts of most of Letters but also the twenty-two similar writings that now make up More Letters from the American Farmer. Those manuscript volumes are now housed in the Library of Congress. Five of the pieces in More Letters are previously unpublished; the others were first published in 1925-26 but were so inconsistently and arbitrarily edited as to misrepresent the author. This edition has been awarded the emblem of the Modern Language Association's Committee on Scholarly Editions. It is based on an examination of all available relevant textual sources and includes extensive textual and historical contextual information. Rather than modernizing Crevecoeur's capitalization, punctuation, and spelling, Dennis D. Moore has preserved the original texts as closely as possible. Thus, More Letters marks the first appearance of these twenty-two writings as Crevecoeur composed them. In his general introduction, Moore discusses the various personae through which Crevecoeur speaks in these essays and notes the stylistic and topical similarities and variations between these writings and those collected in Letters. Pointing to Crevecoeur's evident influences and interests, Moore discusses recurrent themes and images related to medicine, law, religion, classicism, enlightenment philosophy, nationalism, agrarianism, aggression and war, and the cults of sensibility and domesticity. Revising and expanding what we thought we knew about Crevecoeur and his lifelong absorption in America and Americanness, More Letters also makes a significant contribution to the study of early American culture.
Posted in History

The American Farmer

Author: John S. Skinner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7153

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Reclaiming the American Farmer

The Reinvention of a Regional Mythology in Twentieth-century Southern Writing

Author: Mary Weaks-Baxter

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807131296

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 191

View: 2919

In this stimulating study, Mary Weaks-Baxter views the Southern Renaissance, 1900--1960, from a fresh perspective. Many writers in the South began consciously to create new myths for the region at the start of the twentieth century, and these myths, Weaks-Baxter argues, reframed southern history and culture. Instead of being rooted in the plantation culture that had provided inspiration for nineteenth-century southern writers, the new literature was inspired by "southern folk," the common people who farmed the earth and whose values derived from Jeffersonian agrarianism and democracy. By glorifying the yeoman farmer -- a figure not only central to southern life but revered throughout the country -- southern writers confirmed the essential Americanness of southern literature and the southernness of American history, creating a viable myth that offered the promise of renewal and purpose. To illustrate how the myth crossed racial, gender, and economic boundaries as well as geographic lines, Weaks-Baxter examines the work of diverse writers, including Willa Cather, Ellen Glasgow, Olive Dargan, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, Jesse Stuart, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Harriette Arnow, William Faulkner, and the Nashville Agrarians. Their portrayals of the lives of common men and women provided hope for all Americans as they were confronted with industrialization and the Great Depression. Weaks-Baxter shows how this agrarian fable led to a new Southern Renaissance in the late twentieth century, influencing the work of contemporary southern writers such as Madison Smartt Bell, Wendell Berry, Alice Walker, Dori Sanders, and Bobbie Ann Mason. With lively arguments and keen insights, Reclaiming the American Farmer will change the terms of discussion about the Southern Renaissance and southern literature in general as it demonstrates how mythologies can unify southerners as well as divide them.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The American Farmer

Devoted to Agriculture, Horticulture and Rural Life

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 6196

4th ser., v. 1-4 includes the Proceedings of the 1st-11th annual meetings (1848-58) of the Maryland State Agricultural Society.
Posted in Agriculture

The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century

A Social and Cultural History

Author: Richard L. Bushman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300235208

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5273

An illuminating study of America’s agricultural society during the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Founding eras In the eighteenth century, three†‘quarters of Americans made their living from farms. This authoritative history explores the lives, cultures, and societies of America’s farmers from colonial times through the founding of the nation. Noted historian Richard Bushman explains how all farmers sought to provision themselves while still actively engaged in trade, making both subsistence and commerce vital to farm economies of all sizes. The book describes the tragic effects on the native population of farmers’ efforts to provide farms for their children and examines how climate created the divide between the free North and the slave South. Bushman also traces midcentury rural violence back to the century’s population explosion. An engaging work of historical scholarship, the book draws on a wealth of diaries, letters, and other writings—including the farm papers of Thomas Jefferson and George Washington—to open a window on the men, women, and children who worked the land in early America.
Posted in History

The American Farmer

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: N.A

View: 9351

Posted in Technology & Engineering

Letters from an American Farmer

Easyread Comfort Edition

Author: Hector St. Joh Crevecoeur

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1425020739

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 5969

Consummate narrative essays made Crevecoeur a celebrated writer in America. In the epistles he has rendered an ideal American society with egalitarianism and free-will. Remarkable for the beauty of style in depiction of American navet and simple standard of living, it shows the approval of the religious multiplicity created by ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Fascinating!
Posted in Social Science

Letters from an American Farmer

Author: J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 048614688X

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 9530

18th-century classic detailing seafaring life in New England and plantation culture in the South also provided Old World readers with first major impressions of American landscapes, people, and institutions.
Posted in History

Global Agriculture and the American Farmer

Opportunities for U.S. Leadership

Author: Kimberly Ann Elliott

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 1944691006

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 2328

The United States is one of the world’s largest producers and exporters of a range of agricultural commodities, and the largest provider of foreign assistance, so U.S. policies have big effects on global food security and other global public goods linked to agriculture. On the positive side of the ledger, President Obama created the Feed the Future aid initiative to promote agricultural development in poorer countries as a tool to achieve the global goals of ending hunger and extreme poverty, which are mostly rural. But that generosity is undercut by U.S. support for farmers that distorts global markets and ignores negative spillovers for the rest of the world. In this book, Elliott focuses on three policy areas that are particularly damaging for developing countries: traditional agricultural subsidy and trade policies that support the incomes of American farmers at the expense of farmers elsewhere; the biofuels mandate, which in its current form increases market volatility while doing little if anything to mitigate climate change; and weak regulation of antibiotic use in livestock, which contributes to the global spread of drug-resistant super bugs. While noting that broad reforms are needed to fix these problems, Elliott also identifies practical steps that U.S. policymakers could take in the relatively short run to improve farm policies—for American taxpayers and consumers as well as for the poor and vulnerable in developing countries.
Posted in Social Science

The American farmer and the New Deal

Author: Theodore Saloutos

Publisher: Iowa State Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 327

View: 386

Discusses the effects of the Agricultural Adjustment Act on U.S. farmers, looks at the political problems that influenced farm policy, and recounts the effort for rural electrification
Posted in Business & Economics

Problems of plenty

the American farmer in the twentieth century

Author: R. Douglas Hurt

Publisher: Ivan R Dee

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 192

View: 8191

Here is a compact narrative history of American agriculture over the last century.
Posted in Business & Economics

The American Farmer's Instructor, Or Practical Agriculturist

Comprehending the Cultivation of Plants, the Husbandry of the Domestic Animals, and the Economy of the Farm; Together with a Variety of Information which Will be Found Important to the Farmer

Author: Francis S. Wiggins

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: 504

View: 8656

Posted in Agriculture

The American Farmer Vol. X

Author: John S. Skinner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9548

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Land Credits

A Plea for the American Farmer

Author: Dick Thompson Morgan

Publisher: New York : T. Y. Crowell Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agricultural credit

Page: 299

View: 4484

Posted in Agricultural credit