The Agricola and Germany of Tacitus

And the Dialogue on Oratory

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Germanic peoples

Page: 205

View: 7172

Posted in Germanic peoples

The Agricola and Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Latin language

Page: 175

View: 8671

Posted in Latin language

Agricola and Germany

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,Anthony Birley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019953926X

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 6848

Cornelius Tacitus, Rome's greatest historian, was inspired to take up his pen when the assassination of Domitian ended `fifteen years of enforced silence'. Agricola is the biography of his late father-in-law and an account of Roman Britain. Germania gives insight into Rome's most dangerous enemies, the Germans, and is the only surviving specimen from the ancient world of an ethnographic study. Each in its way has had immense influence on our perception of Rome and the northern `barbarians' and the edition reflects recent research in Roman-British and Roman-German history.
Posted in History

A Most Dangerous Book

Tacitus's Germania from the Roman Empire to the Third Reich

Author: Christopher B. Krebs

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393062651

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 4813

Traces the five-hundred year history and wide-ranging influence of the Roman historian's unflattering book about the ancient Germans that was eventually extolled by the Nazis as a bible.
Posted in History

Agricola and Germania

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141961546

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 3319

The Agricola is both a portrait of Julius Agricola - the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus' well-loved and respected father-in-law - and the first detailed account of Britain that has come down to us. It offers fascinating descriptions of the geography, climate and peoples of the country, and a succinct account of the early stages of the Roman occupation, nearly fatally undermined by Boudicca's revolt in AD 61 but consolidated by campaigns that took Agricola as far as Anglesey and northern Scotland. The warlike German tribes are the focus of Tacitus' attention in the Germania, which, like the Agricola, often compares the behaviour of 'barbarian' peoples favourably with the decadence and corruption of Imperial Rome.
Posted in History

The Agricola and Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Latin language

Page: 175

View: 4747

Posted in Latin language

Tacitus on Britain and Germany

a translation of the Agricola and the Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,Harold Mattingly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 1745

Posted in History

The Agricola and Germania of Tacitus

With a Revised Text, English Notes, and Maps

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Germanic peoples

Page: N.A

View: 8752

Posted in Germanic peoples

Dialogus, Agricola, Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Germanic peoples

Page: 371

View: 2166

Posted in Germanic peoples

The Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Germanic peoples

Page: 139

View: 9254

Posted in Germanic peoples

Tacitus

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3790

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Germania

In Wayward Pursuit of the Germans and Their History

Author: Simon Winder

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429945417

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 1835

A UNIQUE EXPLORATION OF GERMAN CULTURE, FROM SAUSAGE ADVERTISEMENTS TO WAGNER Sitting on a bench at a communal table in a restaurant in Regensburg, his plate loaded with disturbing amounts of bratwurst and sauerkraut made golden by candlelight shining through a massive glass of beer, Simon Winder was happily swinging his legs when a couple from Rottweil politely but awkwardly asked: "So: why are you here?" This book is an attempt to answer that question. Why spend time wandering around a country that remains a sort of dead zone for many foreigners, surrounded as it is by a force field of historical, linguistic, climatic, and gastronomic barriers? Winder's book is propelled by a wish to reclaim the brilliant, chaotic, endlessly varied German civilization that the Nazis buried and ruined, and that, since 1945, so many Germans have worked to rebuild. Germania is a very funny book on serious topics—how we are misled by history, how we twist history, and how sometimes it is best to know no history at all. It is a book full of curiosities: odd food, castles, mad princes, fairy tales, and horse-mating videos. It is about the limits of language, the meaning of culture, and the pleasure of townscape.
Posted in History

Agricola and Germania of Tacitus

The Latin Text Re-Arranged to the Natural English Order, with a Careful and Exact Interlinear Translation... - Scholar's Choice Edition

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781296034924

Category:

Page: 86

View: 9132

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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The Complete Works of Tacitus

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: Digireads.com Publishing

ISBN: 9781420947144

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 3281

Ancient Roman senator and historian Publius Cornelius Tacitus is known throughout Western history as one of the greatest historical writers of the Silver Age of Latin literature. He lived during the first century AD and was the son of a wealthy aristocratic family. Not much is known about his personal life; however, it is clear that both Tacitus and Pliny the Elder were acquaintances and even possibly childhood friends, though there is no substantial evidence to support this. Tacitus studied rhetoric in order to create a career in law and politics. He steadily rose throughout the ranks due to his strong speaking style and oration skills. However, his language skills did not stop with verbal speeches. He was also an accomplished writer who focused on the history of the Roman Empire. He created five works, "The Annals," "The Histories," "The Agricola," "The Germania," and "A Dialogue on Oratory." His works delve deep into the facts as he knew them, rarely ever embellishing history to create a story. He also stayed true to chronological order and laid history out in visible steps. It is also notable that Tacitus knew that his fellow politicians were corrupt; he believed that they gave up their strong voice in order to please a usually corrupt emperor. These five great works are brought together in this collection of "The Complete Works of Tacitus."
Posted in History

The Agricola and the Germania

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: Prabhat Prakashan

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3870

'The Agricola' is both a portrait of Julius Agricola - the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus' well-loved and respected father-in-law - and the first detailed account of Britain that has come down to us. It offers fascinating descriptions of the geography, climate and peoples of the country, and a succinct account of the early stages of the Roman occupation, nearly fatally undermined by Boudicca's revolt in AD 61 but consolidated by campaigns that took Agricola as far as Anglesey and northern Scotland. The war-like German tribes are the focus of Tacitus' attention in 'the Germania', which, like 'the Agricola', often compares the behaviour of 'barbarian' people favourably with the decadence and corruption of Imperial Rome.
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The Early History of Rome

Author: Livy

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141963077

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 8288

Livy (c. 59 BC-AD 17) dedicated most of his life to writing some 142 volumes of history, the first five of which comprise The Early History of Rome. With stylistic brilliance, he chronicles nearly 400 years of history, from the founding of Rome (traditionally dated to 757 BC) to the Gallic invasion in 386 BC - an era which witnessed the reign of seven kings, the establishment of the Republic, civil strife and brutal conflict. Bringing compelling characters to life, and re-presenting familiar tales - including the tragedy of Coriolanus and the story of Romulus and Remus - The Early History is a truly epic work, and a passionate warning that Rome should learn from its history.
Posted in History

The Annals of Imperial Rome

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141904798

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 8037

Tacitus' Annals of Imperial Rome recount the major historical events from the years shortly before the death of Augustus up to the death of Nero in AD 68. With clarity and vivid intensity he describes the reign of terror under the corrupt Tiberius, the great fire of Rome during the time of Nero, and the wars, poisonings, scandals, conspiracies and murders that were part of imperial life. Despite his claim that the Annals were written objectively, Tacitus' account is sharply critical of the emperors' excesses and fearful for the future of Imperial Rome, while also filled with a longing for its past glories.
Posted in History

Agricola and Germany

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191605298

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 224

View: 6968

`Long may the barbarians continue, I pray, if not to love us, at least to hate one another.' Cornelius Tacitus, Rome's greatest historian and the last great writer of classical Latin prose, produced his first two books in AD 98. He was inspired to take up his pen when the assassination of Domitian ended `fifteen years of enforced silence'. The first products were brief: the biography of his late father-in-law Julius Agricola and an account of Rome's most dangerous enemies, the Germans. Since Agricola's claim to fame was that as governor for seven years he had completed the conquest of Britain, begun four decades earlier, much of the first work is devoted to Britain and its people. The second is the only surviving specimen from the ancient world of an ethnographic study. Each in its way has had immense influence on our perception of Rome and the northern `barbarians'. This edition reflects recent research in Roman-British and Roman-German history and includes newly discovered evidence on Tacitus' early career. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Posted in Literary Collections

The Germania and Agricola

And Also Selections from the Annals, of Tacitus, with English Notes ...

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 402

View: 6397

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