Subtractive Schooling

U.S. - Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring

Author: Angela Valenzuela

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438422628

Category: Education

Page: 346

View: 8831

Provides an enhanced sense of what’s required to genuinely care for and educate the U.S.–Mexican youth in America.
Posted in Education

Subtractive Schooling

U.S. - Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring

Author: Angela Valenzuela

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791443224

Category: Education

Page: 328

View: 7803

Provides an enhanced sense of what’s required to genuinely care for and educate the U.S.–Mexican youth in America.
Posted in Education

Subtractive Schooling

U.S. - Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring

Author: Angela Valenzuela

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 328

View: 2381

Provides an enhanced sense of what’s required to genuinely care for and educate the U.S.–Mexican youth in America.
Posted in Education

Failure of Corporate School Reform

Author: Kenneth J. Saltman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317259734

Category: Education

Page: 160

View: 1131

Corporate school reforms, especially privatization, union busting, and high-stakes testing have been hailed as the last best hope for public education. Yet, as Kenneth Saltman powerfully argues in this new book, corporate school reforms have decisively failed to deliver on what their proponents have promised for two decades: higher test scores and lower costs. As Saltman illustrates, the failures of corporate school reform are far greater and more destructive than they seem. Left unchecked, corporate school reform fails to challenge and in fact worsens the most pressing problems facing public schooling, including radical funding inequalities, racial segregation, and anti-intellectualism. But it is not too late for change. Against both corporate school reformers and its liberal critics, this book argues for the expansion of democratic pedagogies and a new common school movement that will lead to broader social renewal.
Posted in Education

Growing Critically Conscious Teachers

A Social Justice Curriculum for Educators of Latino/a Youth

Author: Angela Valenzuela

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807773964

Category: Education

Page: 186

View: 8117

To meet the needs of the fast growing numbers of Latino/a English learners, this volume presents an approach to secondary education teacher preparation based on the work of the National Latino/a Education Research and Policy Project (NLERAP). Renowned scholar and educator Angela Valenzuela, together with an impressive roster of contributors, provides a critical framework for educating culturally responsive teachers. They examine the knowledge, skills, and predisposition required for higher education institutions to create curricula for educating Latino/a children, children of color, and language minority youth. Growing Critically Conscious Teachers illuminates why growing our own teachers makes sense as an approach for not only addressing the achievement gap, but for also enhancing the well-being of our communities as a whole. Book Features: A community-based, university- and district-connected partnership model that fosters students’ critical consciousness. A framework for participatory action research (PAR) within teacher preparation that promotes community and societal transformation. A curriculum premised on sociocultural and sociopolitical awareness. The wisdom, experiences, and lessons learned from educators who have been change agents in their own schools, communities, and college classrooms across the country. “An enormous contribution to the field. It will also be a cherished resource and guide for Latino/a and non-Latino/a teachers alike, and for the university faculty and school- and community-based facilitators who help prepare them.” —From the Foreword by Sonia Nieto, Professor Emerita, Language, Literacy, and Culture, College of Education, University of Massachusetts, Amherst “Provides the elemental sparks for essential conversations about culturally responsive teaching and the well-being of youth in our communities. Through a variety of critical perspectives this volume raises significant questions that must be at the forefront of Latino/a education. This excellent volume is a must read for teachers truly committed to educational practices of social justice in schools today.” —Antonia Darder, Leavey Endowed Chair of Ethics and Moral Leadership, Loyola Marymount University
Posted in Education

Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836-1986

Author: David Montejano

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 029278807X

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 9362

A major work on the history of Mexicans in Texas and the relations between Mexicans and Anglos.
Posted in History

Their Highest Potential

An African American School Community in the Segregated South

Author: Vanessa Siddle Walker

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807866191

Category: Social Science

Page: 276

View: 885

African American schools in the segregated South faced enormous obstacles in educating their students. But some of these schools succeeded in providing nurturing educational environments in spite of the injustices of segregation. Vanessa Siddle Walker tells the story of one such school in rural North Carolina, the Caswell County Training School, which operated from 1934 to 1969. She focuses especially on the importance of dedicated teachers and the principal, who believed their jobs extended well beyond the classroom, and on the community's parents, who worked hard to support the school. According to Walker, the relationship between school and community was mutually dependent. Parents sacrificed financially to meet the school's needs, and teachers and administrators put in extra time for professional development, specialized student assistance, and home visits. The result was a school that placed the needs of African American students at the center of its mission, which was in turn shared by the community. Walker concludes that the experience of CCTS captures a segment of the history of African Americans in segregated schools that has been overlooked and that provides important context for the ongoing debate about how best to educate African American children. African American History/Education/North Carolina
Posted in Social Science

The Future of Our Schools

Teachers Unions and Social Justice

Author: Lois Weiner

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608462625

Category: Education

Page: 229

View: 4246

Timely and experience-based guide to strengthening democracy within teachers unions.
Posted in Education

Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change

Author: Eve Tuck,K. Wayne Yang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135068410

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 6544

Youth resistance has become a pressing global phenomenon, to which many educators and researchers have looked for inspiration and/or with chagrin. Although the topic of much discussion and debate, it remains dramatically under-theorized, particularly in terms of theories of change. Resistance has been a prominent concern of educational research for several decades, yet understandings of youth resistance frequently lack complexity, often seize upon convenient examples to confirm entrenched ideas about social change, and overly regulate what "counts" as progress. As this comprehensive volume illustrates, understanding and researching youth resistance requires much more than a one-dimensional theory. Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change provides readers with new ways to see and engage youth resistance to educational injustices. This volume features interviews with prominent theorists, including Signithia Fordham, James C. Scott, Michelle Fine, Robin D.G. Kelley, Gerald Vizenor, and Pedro Noguera, reflecting on their own work in light of contemporary uprisings, neoliberal crises, and the impact of new technologies globally. Chapters presenting new studies in youth resistance exemplify approaches which move beyond calcified theories of resistance. Essays on needed interventions to youth resistance research provide guidance for further study. As a whole, this rich volume challenges current thinking on resistance, and extends new trajectories for research, collaboration, and justice.
Posted in Education

Ghetto Schooling

A Political Economy of Urban Educational Reform

Author: Jean Anyon

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 9780807736630

Category: Education

Page: 217

View: 1548

In this personal account, Jean Anyon provides evidence that the economic and political devastation of America's inner cities has robbed schools and teachers of the capacity to successfully implement current strategies of educational reform. She argues that without fundamental change in government and business policies and the redirection of major resources back into the schools and the communities they serve, urban schools are consigned to failure, and no effort at raising standards, improving teaching, or boosting achievement can occur.
Posted in Education

Leaving Children Behind

How "Texas-style" Accountability Fails Latino Youth

Author: Angela Valenzuela

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791462393

Category: Education

Page: 313

View: 7480

Argues for a more valid and democratic approach to assessment and accountability.
Posted in Education

Chicano School Failure and Success

Past, Present, and Future

Author: Richard R. Valencia

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415257735

Category: Education

Page: 383

View: 7885

During the early 1990s - when this book's first edition was published - the Chicano population in the USA numbered nearly 13 million (two thirds of its total Latino population). Indications were that school problems and conditions - which were already poor for these people - were worsening. A decade down the line, how has the situation changed? From various perspectives, the second edition of this respected work examines the school failure and success of Chicano students. For many years two theories have prevailed: one being that institutional forces and structures that promote and maintain inequality are the root cause of these poor schooling conditions and outcomes; the other being a set of insidious assumptions steeped in racism. In recent years, however, scholarship has followed more constructive streams of thought. Two features characterise his new edition. Each contributor provides a comprehensive and state-of-the-art chapter, updated with a contemporary commentary on Chicano students. They also address the question of whether the educational status of the Chicano population will grow commensurately with its population.
Posted in Education

Integration Interrupted

Tracking, Black Students, and Acting White after Brown

Author: Karolyn Tyson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199793018

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 3097

An all-too-popular explanation for why black students aren't doing better in school is their own use of the "acting white" slur to ridicule fellow blacks for taking advanced classes, doing schoolwork, and striving to earn high grades. Carefully reconsidering how and why black students have come to equate school success with whiteness, Integration Interrupted argues that when students understand race to be connected with achievement, it is a powerful lesson conveyed by schools, not their peers. Drawing on over ten years of ethnographic research, Karolyn Tyson shows how equating school success with "acting white" arose in the aftermath of Brown v. Board of Education through the practice of curriculum tracking, which separates students for instruction, ostensibly by ability and prior achievement. Only in very specific circumstances, when black students are drastically underrepresented in advanced and gifted classes, do anxieties about "the burden of acting white" emerge. Racialized tracking continues to define the typical American secondary school, but it goes unremarked, except by the young people who experience its costs and consequences daily. The rich narratives in Integration Interrupted throw light on the complex relationships underlying school behaviors and convincingly demonstrate that the problem lies not with students, but instead with how we organize our schools.
Posted in Social Science

Latinization of U.S. Schools

Successful Teaching and Learning in Shifting Cultural Contexts

Author: Jason Irizarry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317257014

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 8344

Fueled largely by significant increases in the Latino population, the racial, ethnic, and linguistic texture of the United States is changing rapidly. Nowhere is this 'Latinisation' of America more evident than in schools. The dramatic population growth among Latinos in the United States has not been accompanied by gains in academic achievement. Estimates suggest that approximately half of Latino students fail to complete high school, and few enroll in and complete college. The Latinization of U.S. Schools centres on the voices of Latino youth. It examines how the students themselves make meaning of the policies and practices within schools. The student voices expose an inequitable opportunity structure that results in depressed academic performance for many Latino youth. Each chapter concludes with empirically based recommendations for educators seeking to improve their practice with Latino youth, stemming from a multiyear participatory action research project conducted by Irizarry and the student contributors to the text.
Posted in Education

Academic Profiling

Latinos, Asian Americans, and the Achievement Gap

Author: Gilda L. Ochoa

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780816687404

Category: Education

Page: 315

View: 7894

In Academic Profiling, Gilda L. Ochoa addresses today's so-called achievement gap by going directly to the source. At one California public high school where the controversy is lived every day, Ochoa turns to the students, teachers, and parents to learn about the very real disparities—in opportunity, status, treatment, and assumptions—that lead to more than just gaps in achievement.
Posted in Education

Women without Class

Girls, Race, and Identity

Author: Julie Bettie

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520957245

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 8476

In this ethnographic examination of Mexican-American and white girls coming of age in California’s Central Valley, Julie Bettie turns class theory on its head, asking what cultural gestures are involved in the performance of class, and how class subjectivity is constructed in relationship to color, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. A new introduction contextualizes the book for the contemporary moment and situates it within current directions in cultural theory. Investigating the cultural politics of how inequalities are both reproduced and challenged, Bettie examines the discursive formations that provide a context for the complex identity performances of contemporary girls. The book’s title refers at once to young working-class women who have little cultural capital to enable class mobility; to the fact that analyses of class too often remain insufficiently transformed by feminist, ethnic, and queer studies; and to the failure of some feminist theory itself to theorize women as class subjects. Women without Class makes a case for analytical and political attention to class, but not at the expense of attention to other social formations.
Posted in Social Science

The Color of Success

Race and High-achieving Urban Youth

Author: Gilberto Q. Conchas

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 9780807746608

Category: Education

Page: 147

View: 3868

Through students' own voices and perspectives, this book reveals how and why some racial minorities achieve academic success, despite limited opportunity. Based on the experiences of Black, Latino, and Vietnamese urban high school students, the author provides a revealing comparative analysis that offers insight into how schools can provide opportunities and safe learning environments where youth acquire real goals, expectations, and tangible pathways for success. Offering alternatives to current practices and structures of inequality that plague educational systems throughout the nation, this sociologically informed book: takes a rare look at urban school success stories, instead of those depicting failure; explores the social processes that enable racial minority youth to escape the unequal structures of urban schooling to perform well in school; and focuses on youth's interpretations and reactions to the schooling process to determine how schools can empower youth and promote the social mobility of low-income urban populations.
Posted in Education

Chinese Philosophy on Teaching and Learning

Xueji in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Xu Di,Hunter McEwan

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438459726

Category: Religion

Page: 180

View: 5216

A translation and discussion of the central Confucian text on education, Xueji (On Learning and Teaching), influential in China from the Han dynasty to the present day. Written over two and a half millennia ago, the Xueji (On Teaching and Learning) is one of the oldest and most comprehensive works on educational philosophy and teaching methods as well as a consideration of the appropriate roles of teachers and students. The Xueji was included in the Liji (On Ritual), one of the Five Classics that became the heart of the educational system during China’s imperial era, and it contains the ritual protocols adopted by the Imperial Academy during the Han dynasty. Chinese Philosophy on Teaching and Learning provides a new translation of the Xueji along with essays exploring this work from both Western and Chinese perspectives. Contributors examine the roots of educational thought in classical Chinese philosophy, outline similarities and differences with ideas rooted in classical Greek thought, and explore what the Xueji can offer educators today. “As the world of education awakens to the vitality and importance of China’s educational traditions, no text could be of greater interest than the Xueji—China’s most ancient text on learning and teaching. This translation, with interpretation and discussion from noted philosophers and educators in China and America, will be an invaluable resource for courses in educational foundations, comparative education, and the history of education.” — Ruth Hayhoe, University of Toronto
Posted in Religion

Latinos in the United States: Diversity and Change

Author: Rogelio S?enz,Maria Cristina Morales

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1509500162

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 8157

As the major driver of U.S. demographic change, Latinos are reshaping key aspects of the social, economic, political, and cultural landscape of the country. In the process, Latinos are challenging the longstanding black/white paradigm that has been used as a lens to understand racial and ethnic matters in the United States. In this book, Sáenz and Morales provide one of the broadest sociological examinations of Latinos in the United States. The book focuses on the numerous diverse groups that constitute the Latino population and the role that the U.S. government has played in establishing immigration from Latin America to the United States. The book highlights the experiences of Latinos in a variety of domains including education, political engagement, work and economic life, family, religion, health and health care, crime and victimization, and mass media. To address these issues in each chapter the authors engage sociological perspectives, present data examining major trends for both native-born and immigrant populations, and engage readers in thinking about the major issues that Latinos are facing in each of these dimensions. The book clearly illustrates the diverse experiences of the array of Latino groups in the United States, with some of these groups succeeding socially and economically, while other groups continue to experience major social and economic challenges. The book concludes with a discussion of what the future holds for Latinos. This book is essential reading for undergraduate and graduate students, social scientists, and policymakers interested in Latinos and their place in contemporary society.
Posted in Social Science

Rows of Memory

Journeys of a Migrant Sugar-Beet Worker

Author: Saul Sanchez

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1609382331

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 210

View: 6939

Every year from April to October, the Sánchez family traveled—crowded in the back of trucks, camping in converted barns, tending and harvesting crops across the breadth of the United States. Although hoeing sugar beets with a short hoe was their specialty, they also picked oranges in California, apples in Washington, cucumbers in Michigan, onions and potatoes in Wisconsin, and tomatoes in Iowa. Winters they returned home to the Winter Garden region of South Texas. In 1951, Saúl Sánchez began to contribute to his family’s survival by helping to weed onions in Wind Lake, Wisconsin. He was eight years old. Rows of Memory tells his story and the story of his family and other migrant farm laborers like them, people who endured dangerous, dirty conditions and low pay, surviving because they took care of each other. Facing racism both on the road and at home, they lived a largely segregated life only occasionally breached by friendly employers. Despite starting school late and leaving early every year and having to learn English on the fly, young Saúl succeeded academically. At the same time that Mexican Americans in South Texas upended the Anglo-dominated social order by voting their own leaders into local government, he upended his family’s order by deciding to go to college. Like many migrant children, he knew that his decision to pursue an education meant he would no longer be able to help feed and clothe the rest of his family. Nevertheless, with his parents’ support, he went to college, graduating in 1967 and, after a final display of his skill with a short hoe for his new friends, abandoned migrant labor for teaching. In looking back at his youth, Sánchez invites us to appreciate the largely unrecognized and poorly rewarded strength and skill of the laborers who harvest the fruits and vegetables we eat. A first-person portrait of life on the bottom rung of the food system, this coming-of-age tale illuminates both the history of Latinos in the United States and the human consequences of industrial agriculture.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography