Social Issues in Contemporary Native America

Reflections from Turtle Island

Author: Hilary N. Weaver

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317053885

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 7504

Hilary Weaver has drawn together leading Native American social workers, researchers, and academics to provide current information on a variety of social issues related to Native American children, families, and reservations both in the USA and in Canada. Divided into four major sections, each containing an introduction, this book places the historical foundations of Native American social work in context in order to fully provide the reader with a comprehensive survey on various aspects of working with Native American families; community health and wellness; and community revitalization and decolonization. This groundbreaking volume should be read by both educators and students in social work and other helping professions in the USA and Canada as well as all human service professionals working with Native Americans.
Posted in Social Science

American Indians and the Urban Experience

Author: Kurt Peters,Susan Lobo

Publisher: AltaMira Press

ISBN: 0585386366

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1079

Modern American Indian life is urban, rural, and everything in-between. Lobo and Peters have compiled an unprecedented collection of innovative scholarship, stunning art, poetry, and prose that documents American Indian experiences of urban life. A pervasive rural/urban dichotomy still shapes the popular and scholarly perceptions of Native Americans, but this is a false expression of a complex and constantly changing reality. When viewed from the Native perspectives, our concepts of urbanity and approaches to American Indian studies are necessarily transformed. Courses in Native American studies, ethnic studies, anthropology, and urban studies must be in step with contemporary Indian realities, and American Indians and the Urban Experience will be an absolutely essential text for instructors. This powerful combination of path-breaking scholarship and visual and literary arts—from poetry and photography to rap and graffiti—will be enjoyed by students, scholars, and a general audience. A Choice Outstanding Academic Book.
Posted in History

The World of the American West: A Daily Life Encyclopedia [2 volumes]

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440828601

Category: History

Page: 943

View: 8985

Addressing everything from the details of everyday life to recreation and warfare, this two-volume work examines the social, political, intellectual, and material culture of the American "Old West," from the California Gold Rush of 1849 to the end of the 19th century. • Offers insights based on social history and the daily experience of the average person to engage students' interest and curiosity rather than focusing on the events, dates, and names of "traditional history" • Presents information within a thematic organization that encourages a more in-depth study of specific aspects of daily life in the Old West • Includes related primary documents that enable students to view history more directly and reach their own conclusions about past events • Examines a wide range of topics such as work, family life, clothing and fashion, food and drink, housing and community, politics, social customs, spirituality, and technology • Provides a general introduction per volume, individual topic introductions, numerous images and illustrations, a timeline of events, and a bibliography identifying print and nonprint resources
Posted in History

People of Color in the United States: Contemporary Issues in Education, Work, Communities, Health, and Immigration [4 volumes]

Author: Kofi Lomotey,Pamela Braboy Jackson,Muna Adem,Paulina X. Ruf,Valire Carr Copeland,Alvaro Huerta,Norma V Iglesias-Prieto Ph.D.,Donathan L. Brown

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 161069855X

Category: Social Science

Page: 1986

View: 8494

This expansive, four-volume ready-reference work offers critical coverage of contemporary issues that impact people of color in the United States, ranging from education and employment to health and wellness and immigration. • Offers comprehensive coverage of contemporary issues for people of color in the United States that meets the needs of secondary librarians, teachers, and students for a variety of classes and standards • Presents A–Z entries within four broad themes that explore the social and economic issues that will support readers' understanding of the experiences of people of color in the United States • Includes debate essays highlighting a variety of viewpoints on key issues from scholars that provide readers with models of critical thinking • Contains up-to-date information appropriate for classes on history, sociology, psychology, geography, economics, urbanization, immigration and industrialization, and contemporary American society
Posted in Social Science

Why Don't the Poor Rise Up?

Organizing the Twenty-First Century Resistance

Author: Ajamu Nangwaya,Michael Truscello

Publisher: AK Press

ISBN: 1849352798

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 6426

"Each of these essays is a sharpened weapon for the battles looming large on the horizon." -George Ciccariello-Maher, author of Building the Commune "Combining the most creative thought from the global North and South, Why Don't the Poor Rise Up? promises to be an indispensable resource for understanding why the new revolutionary movement of the 21st century will emerge from the ranks of the most marginalized by capitalism and colonialism." -Ajamu Baraka, editor of Black Agenda Report Even mainstream media like the New York Times and The Economist have recently posed the question: Why don't the poor rise up?, uneasily amazed that capitalism hasn't met with greater resistance. In the context of unparalleled global wealth disparity, ecological catastrophe, and myriad forms of structural oppression, this vibrant collection offers a reassessment of contemporary obstacles to mass mobilization, as well as examples from around the world of poor people overcoming those obstacles in inspiring and instructive new ways. With contributions from Idle No More cofounder Alex Wilson, noted Italian theorist Franco "Bifo" Berardi, and nineteen other scholars and activists from around the world, Why Don't the Poor Rise Up? presents a truly global range of perspectives that explore the question of revolution, its objective and subjective prerequisites, and its increasing likelihood in our time. Ajamu Nangwaya, Ph.D., is an educator at Seneca College with over twenty-five years of experience in community organizing and advocacy. Michael Truscello, Ph.D., is an educator at Mount Royal University and author of the forthcoming book- The Infrastructure Society.
Posted in Social Science

The Beginning and End of Rape

Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America

Author: Sarah Deer

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 145294573X

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 9276

Winner of the Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award Despite what major media sources say, violence against Native women is not an epidemic. An epidemic is biological and blameless. Violence against Native women is historical and political, bounded by oppression and colonial violence. This book, like all of Sarah Deer’s work, is aimed at engaging the problem head-on—and ending it. The Beginning and End of Rape collects and expands the powerful writings in which Deer, who played a crucial role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in 2013, has advocated for cultural and legal reforms to protect Native women from endemic sexual violence and abuse. Deer provides a clear historical overview of rape and sex trafficking in North America, paying particular attention to the gendered legacy of colonialism in tribal nations—a truth largely overlooked or minimized by Native and non-Native observers. She faces this legacy directly, articulating strategies for Native communities and tribal nations seeking redress. In a damning critique of federal law that has accommodated rape by destroying tribal legal systems, she describes how tribal self-determination efforts of the twenty-first century can be leveraged to eradicate violence against women. Her work bridges the gap between Indian law and feminist thinking by explaining how intersectional approaches are vital to addressing the rape of Native women. Grounded in historical, cultural, and legal realities, both Native and non-Native, these essays point to the possibility of actual and positive change in a world where Native women are systematically undervalued, left unprotected, and hurt. Deer draws on her extensive experiences in advocacy and activism to present specific, practical recommendations and plans of action for making the world safer for all.
Posted in Social Science

Custer Died For Your Sins

Author: Vine Deloria

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501188232

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 1783

Standing Rock Sioux activist, professor, and attorney Vine Deloria, Jr., shares his thoughts about US race relations, federal bureaucracies, Christian churches, and social scientists in a collection of eleven eye-opening essays infused with humor. This “manifesto” provides valuable insights on American Indian history, Native American culture, and context for minority protest movements mobilizing across the country throughout the 1960s and early 1970s. Originally published in 1969, this book remains a timeless classic and is one of the most significant nonfiction works written by a Native American.
Posted in History

Working Ethically in Child Protection

Author: Bob Lonne,Maria Harries,Brid Featherstone,Mel Gray

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317914457

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 7535

In their day-to-day practice, social work and human services practitioners frequently find themselves in confusing ethical quandaries, trying to balance the numerous competing interests of protecting children from harm and promoting family and community capacity. This book explores the ethical issues surrounding child protection interventions and offers a process-oriented approach to ethical practice and decision making in child protection and family welfare practice. Its aim is to prepare students and early-career professionals for roles in the complex and challenging work of child protection and family support. Beginning with a critical analysis and appreciation of the diverse organisational and cultural contexts of contemporary child protection and ethical decision-making frameworks, the authors outline a practical ‘real-world’ model for reshaping frontline ethical practice. Moving away from a focus on the child apart from the family, the authors recognise that child safeguarding affects the lives, not just of children, but also of parents, grandparents and communities. Working Ethically in Child Protection eschews dominant rational-technical models for relational ones that are value centred and focus on family well-being as a whole. Rather than a single focus on assessing risk and diagnosing deficit, this book recognises that our child protection systems bear down disproportionately on those from disadvantaged and marginalised communities and argues that what is needed is real support and practical assistance for poor and vulnerable parents and children. It uses real-world case examples to illustrate the relevant ethical and practice principles, and ways in which students and practitioners can practise ethically when dealing with complex, multi-faceted issues.
Posted in Social Science

I Am Compassionate Creativity

111 Stories from Preschool to Providence

Author: Kali Quinn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780997393330

Category:

Page: 470

View: 6405

111 stories, 111 values, one million miles, infinite connections all asking: "What is Compassion? What is Creativity? And what happens when we put them together?" Part memoir, part field guide, part curriculum, through her life's work in Compassionate Creativity, Kali Quinn weaves a tapestry of experiences into an inspiring, funny, moving, and magical testament to the abounding resiliency of the human spirit. NOTE: All the proceeds of this book go toward the national reading tour and the Center for Compassionate Creativity! To give more and learn more, visit: http: //www.compassionatecreativity.com
Posted in

Trans-generational Trauma and the Other

Dialogues across history and difference

Author: Sue Grand,Jill Salberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315466279

Category: Psychology

Page: 262

View: 8063

Often, our trans-generational legacies are stories of 'us' and 'them' that never reach their terminus. We carry fixed narratives, and the ghosts of our perpetrators and of our victims. We long to be subjects in our own history, but keep reconstituting the Other as an object in their own history. Trans-generational Trauma and the Other argues that healing requires us to engage with the Other who carries a corresponding pre-history. Without this dialogue, alienated ghosts can become persecutory objects, in psyche, politics, and culture. ? This volume examines the violent loyalties of the past, the barriers to dialogue with our Other, and complicates the inter-subjectivity of Big History. Identifying our inherited narratives and relinquishing splitting, these authors ask how we can re-cast our Other, and move beyond dysfunctional repetitions - in our individual lives and in society.?? Featuring rich clinical material, Trans-generational Trauma and the Other provides an invaluable guide to expanding the application of trans-generational transmission in psychoanalysis. It will appeal to psychoanalysts, psychoanalytic psychotherapists and trauma experts.
Posted in Psychology

Anguish Of Snails

Native American Folklore in the West

Author: Barre Toelken

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 0874214750

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 2386

After a career working and living with American Indians and studying their traditions, Barre Toelken has written this sweeping study of Native American folklore in the West. Within a framework of performance theory, cultural worldview, and collaborative research, he examines Native American visual arts, dance, oral tradition (story and song), humor, and patterns of thinking and discovery to demonstrate what can be gleaned from Indian traditions by Natives and non-Natives alike. In the process he considers popular distortions of Indian beliefs, demystifies many traditions by showing how they can be comprehended within their cultural contexts, considers why some aspects of Native American life are not meant to be understood by or shared with outsiders, and emphasizes how much can be learned through sensitivity to and awareness of cultural values. Winner of the 2004 Chicago Folklore Prize, The Anguish of Snails is an essential work for the collection of any serious reader in folklore or Native American studies.
Posted in Social Science

Red Pedagogy

Native American Social and Political Thought

Author: Sandy Grande

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 161048990X

Category: Education

Page: 332

View: 1991

This ground-breaking text explores the intersection between dominant modes of critical educational theory and the socio-political landscape of American Indian education. Grande asserts that, with few exceptions, the matters of Indigenous people and Indian education have been either largely ignored or indiscriminately absorbed within critical theories of education.
Posted in Education

The Truth about Stories

A Native Narrative

Author: Thomas King

Publisher: House of Anansi

ISBN: 0887846963

Category: Authors, Canadian

Page: 172

View: 2374

Winner of the 2003 Trillium Book Award "Stories are wondrous things," award-winning author and scholar Thomas King declares in his 2003 CBC Massey Lectures. "And they are dangerous." Beginning with a traditional Native oral story, King weaves his way through literature and history, religion and politics, popular culture and social protest, gracefully elucidating North America's relationship with its Native peoples. Native culture has deep ties to storytelling, and yet no other North American culture has been the subject of more erroneous stories. The Indian of fact, as King says, bears little resemblance to the literary Indian, the dying Indian, the construct so powerfully and often destructively projected by White North America. With keen perception and wit, King illustrates that stories are the key to, and only hope for, human understanding. He compels us to listen well.
Posted in Authors, Canadian

The Ecological Indian

Myth and History

Author: Shepard Krech

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393321005

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 1527

Challenging many sacrosanct notions about the relationship between Native Americans and nature, the author discusses the possible role of Pleistocene-era humans in eradicating the mastodon, over-irrigation of crops among the Hohokam of Arizona, and slash-and-burn farming techniques. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
Posted in History

Ethnographies and Exchanges

Native Americans, Moravians, and Catholics in Early North America

Author: Anthony Gregg Roeber

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271047402

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 8145

This volume explores the interactions of two seventeenth- and eighteenth-century European settlement peoples with Native Americans: German-speaking Moravian Protestants, and French-speaking Roman Catholics. It is among these two European groups that we have some of the richest records of the exchange between early settlers and Native Americans."--BOOK JACKET.
Posted in History

Indigenous Education

Language, Culture and Identity

Author: W. James Jacob,Sheng Yao Cheng,Maureen Porter

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9401793557

Category: Education

Page: 467

View: 1434

Indigenous Education is a compilation of conceptual chapters and national case studies that includes empirical research based on a series of data collection methods. The book provides up-to-date scholarly research on global trends on three issues of paramount importance with indigenous education—language, culture, and identity. It also offers a strategic comparative and international education policy statement on recent shifts in indigenous education, and new approaches to explore, develop, and improve comparative education and policy research globally. Contributing authors examine several social justice issues related to indigenous education. In addition to case perspectives from 12 countries and global regions, the volume includes five conceptual chapters on topics that influence indigenous education, including policy debates, the media, the united nations, formal and informal education systems, and higher education.
Posted in Education

The Interpretation of Cultures

Author: Clifford Geertz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093566

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 7419

In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.
Posted in Social Science

Indian Country

Essays on Contemporary Native Culture

Author: Gail Guthrie Valaskakis

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1554588103

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 6766

Since first contact, Natives and newcomers have been involved in an increasingly complex struggle over power and identity. Modern “Indian wars” are fought over land and treaty rights, artistic appropriation, and academic analysis, while Native communities struggle among themselves over membership, money, and cultural meaning. In cultural and political arenas across North America, Natives enact and newcomers protest issues of traditionalism, sovereignty, and self-determination. In these struggles over domination and resistance, over different ideologies and Indian identities, neither Natives nor other North Americans recognize the significance of being rooted together in history and culture, or how representations of “Indianness” set them in opposition to each other. In Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture, Gail Guthrie Valaskakis uses a cultural studies approach to offer a unique perspective on Native political struggle and cultural conflict in both Canada and the United States. She reflects on treaty rights and traditionalism, media warriors, Indian princesses, powwow, museums, art, and nationhood. According to Valaskakis, Native and non-Native people construct both who they are and their relations with each other in narratives that circulate through art, anthropological method, cultural appropriation, and Native reappropriation. For Native peoples and Others, untangling the past—personal, political, and cultural—can help to make sense of current struggles over power and identity that define the Native experience today. Grounded in theory and threaded with Native voices and evocative descriptions of “Indian” experience (including the author’s), the essays interweave historical and political process, personal narrative, and cultural critique. This book is an important contribution to Native studies that will appeal to anyone interested in First Nations’ experience and popular culture.
Posted in Social Science

Explorations in Cultural Competence

Journeys to the Four Directions

Author: Hilary N. Weaver

Publisher: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780534641481

Category: Psychology

Page: 306

View: 3859

EXPLORATIONS IN CULTURAL COMPETENCE: JOURNEY TO THE FOUR DIRECTIONS provides a fresh look at diversity by presenting a more historical and sociological perspective that speaks to the evolution of diversity consciousness within social work. Weaver provides examples and practice skills for specific populations to help you learn how to apply these concepts and practices in a culturally competent manner.
Posted in Psychology

Social Life and Issues

Author: Roe Bubar,Irene S. Vernon

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 1438101309

Category: HIV-positive persons

Page: 130

View: 1611

Study the social issues faced by Native Americans within the context of the genesis of the problems and what efforts have been made to address them. Some of the subjects covered include health, HIV/AIDS, and violence against women.
Posted in HIV-positive persons