Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, 1885-1917

Author: Gretchen Soderlund

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022602136X

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 7110

During the first half of the nineteenth century, the penny presses of the industrial East treated brothels as a mundane, if annoying, aspect of city life. But later in the century, reformers and mainstream papers began to push back against this representation through highly public campaigns against “white slavery.” These newspaper crusades mixed a potent cocktail of lurid sexual detail and sensationalist scandal aimed equally at promoting anti-vice measures, arousing popular demand for progressive reform, and increasing newspaper circulation. In Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, Gretchen Soderlund offers a new way to understand sensationalism in both newspapers and reform movements. By tracing the history of high-profile print exposés on sex trafficking by journalists like William T. Stead and George Kibbe Turner, Soderlund demonstrates how controversies over gender, race, and sexuality were central to the shift from sensationalism to objectivity—and crucial to the development of journalism in the early twentieth century.
Posted in History

Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, 1885-1917

Author: Gretchen Soderlund

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022602167X

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 3512

In Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, Gretchen Soderlund offers a new way to understand sensationalism in both newspapers and reform movements. By tracing the history of high-profile print exposés on sex trafficking by journalists like William T. Stead and George Kibbe Turner, Soderlund demonstrates how controversies over gender, race, and sexuality were central to the shift from sensationalism to objectivity—and crucial to the development of journalism in the early twentieth century.
Posted in History

Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, 1885-1917

Author: Gretchen Soderlund

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226021539

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 502

During the first half of the nineteenth century, the penny presses of the industrial East treated brothels as a mundane, if annoying, aspect of city life. But later in the century, reformers and mainstream papers began to push back against this representation through highly public campaigns against “white slavery.” These newspaper crusades mixed a potent cocktail of lurid sexual detail and sensationalist scandal aimed equally at promoting anti-vice measures, arousing popular demand for progressive reform, and increasing newspaper circulation. In Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, Gretchen Soderlund offers a new way to understand sensationalism in both newspapers and reform movements. By tracing the history of high-profile print exposés on sex trafficking by journalists like William T. Stead and George Kibbe Turner, Soderlund demonstrates how controversies over gender, race, and sexuality were central to the shift from sensationalism to objectivity—and crucial to the development of journalism in the early twentieth century.
Posted in History

Natural Disasters and Victorian Empire

Famines, Fevers and the Literary Cultures of South Asia

Author: U. Mukherjee

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137001135

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 366

Natural Disasters and Victorian Empire looks at the relationship between epidemics and famines in south Asia and Victorian literature and culture. It suggests that much of how we think today about disasters, state and society can be traced back to the 19th-century British imperial experience.
Posted in Literary Criticism

I've Got to Make My Livin'

Black Women's Sex Work in Turn-of-the-Century Chicago

Author: Cynthia M. Blair

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226056007

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 6915

For many years, the interrelated histories of prostitution and cities have perked the ears of urban scholars, but until now the history of urban sex work has dealt only in passing with questions of race. In I’ve Got to Make My Livin’, Cynthia Blair explores African American women’s sex work in Chicago during the decades of some of the city’s most explosive growth, expanding not just our view of prostitution, but also of black women’s labor, the Great Migration, black and white reform movements, and the emergence of modern sexuality. Focusing on the notorious sex districts of the city’s south side, Blair paints a complex portrait of black prostitutes as conscious actors and historical agents; prostitution, she argues here, was both an arena of exploitation and abuse, as well as a means of resisting middle-class sexual and economic norms. Blair ultimately illustrates just how powerful these norms were, offering stories about the struggles that emerged among black and white urbanites in response to black women’s increasing visibility in the city’s sex economy. Through these powerful narratives, I’ve Got to Make My Livin’ reveals the intersecting racial struggles and sexual anxieties that underpinned the celebration of Chicago as the quintessentially modern twentieth-century city.
Posted in Social Science

The International Politics of Human Trafficking

Author: Gillian Wylie

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137377755

Category: Political Science

Page: 197

View: 2791

This book explores the international politics behind the identification of human trafficking as a major global problem. Since 2000, tackling human trafficking has spawned new legal, security and political architecture. This book is grounded in the premise that the intense response to this issue is at odds with the shaky statistics and contentious definitions underpinning it. Given the disparity between architecture and evidence, Wylie asks why human trafficking has become widely understood as a threat to personal and state security in today's world. Relying on the idea of 'norm lifecycle' from constructivist International Relations, this volume traces the rise and impact of anti-trafficking activism. Global common knowledge about trafficking is now established, but at a cost. Taking issue with the predominant framing of trafficking as sexual exploitation, this book focuses on how contemporary globalization causes labour exploitation, while the concept of trafficking legitimates states' securitized responses to migration.
Posted in Political Science

The International Encyclopedia of Political Communication, 3 Volume Set

Author: Gianpietro Mazzoleni

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118290755

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1656

View: 3785

The International Encyclopedia of Political Communication is the definitive single–source reference work on the subject, with state–of–the–art and in–depth scholarly reflection on the key issues within political communication from leading international experts. It is available both online and in print. Explores pertinent/salient topics within political science, sociology, psychology, communication and many other disciplines Theory, empirical research and academic as well as professional debate are widely covered in this truly international and comparative work Provides clear definitions and explanations which are both cross–national and cross–disciplinary by nature Offers an unprecedented level of authority, accuracy and balance, with contributions from leading international experts in their associated fields Published with regularly updating online edition which will ensure readers are kept abreast of the latest developments in research
Posted in Language Arts & Disciplines

Trafficked Children and Youth in the United States

Reimagining Survivors

Author: Elzbieta M. Gozdziak

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813569710

Category: Political Science

Page: 194

View: 2687

Trafficked children are portrayed by the media—and even by child welfare specialists—as hapless victims who are forced to migrate from a poor country to the United States, where they serve as sex slaves. But as Elzbieta M. Gozdziak reveals in Trafficked Children in the United States, the picture is far more complex. Basing her observations on research with 140 children, most of them girls, from countries all over the globe, Gozdziak debunks many myths and uncovers the realities of the captivity, rescue, and rehabilitation of trafficked children. She shows, for instance, that none of the girls and boys portrayed in this book were kidnapped or physically forced to accompany their traffickers. In many instances, parents, or smugglers paid by family members, brought the girls to the U.S. Without exception, the girls and boys in this study believed they were coming to the States to find employment and in some cases educational opportunities. Following them from the time they were trafficked to their years as young adults, Gozdziak gives the children a voice so they can offer their own perspective on rebuilding their lives—getting jobs, learning English, developing friendships, and finding love. Gozdziak looks too at how the children’s perspectives compare to the ideas of child welfare programs, noting that the children focus on survival techniques while the institutions focus, not helpfully, on vulnerability and pathology. Gozdziak concludes that the services provided by institutions are in effect a one-size-fits-all, trauma-based model, one that ignores the diversity of experience among trafficked children. Breaking new ground, Trafficked Children in the United States offers a fresh take on what matters most to these young people as they rebuild their lives in America.
Posted in Political Science

The Sleep of Reason

Erotic Experience and Sexual Ethics in Ancient Greece and Rome

Author: Martha C. Nussbaum,Juha Sihvola

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226923312

Category: Psychology

Page: 457

View: 4169

Sex is beyond reason, and yet we constantly reason about it. So, too, did the peoples of ancient Greece and Rome. But until recently there has been little discussion of their views on erotic experience and sexual ethics. The Sleep of Reason brings together an international group of philosophers, philologists, literary critics, and historians to consider two questions normally kept separate: how is erotic experience understood in classical texts of various kinds, and what ethical judgments and philosophical arguments are made about sex? From same-sex desire to conjugal love, and from Plato and Aristotle to the Roman Stoic Musonius Rufus, the contributors demonstrate the complexity and diversity of classical sexuality. They also show that the ethics of eros, in both Greece and Rome, shared a number of commonalities: a focus not only on self-mastery, but also on reciprocity; a concern among men not just for penetration and display of their power, but also for being gentle and kind, and for being loved for themselves; and that women and even younger men felt not only gratitude and acceptance, but also joy and sexual desire. Contributors: * Eva Cantarella * Kenneth Dover * Chris Faraone * Simon Goldhill * Stephen Halliwell * David M. Halperin * J. Samuel Houser * Maarit Kaimio * David Konstan * David Leitao * Martha C. Nussbaum * A. W. Price * Juha Sihvola
Posted in Psychology

The Cultural Politics of European Prostitution Reform

Governing Loose Women

Author: Greggor Mattson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137517174

Category: Political Science

Page: 247

View: 2825

The Cultural Politics of European Prostitution Reform traces case studies of four European Union countries to reveal the way anxieties over globalization translates into policies to recognize sex workers in some countries, punish prostitutes' clients in others, and protect victims of human trafficking in them all.
Posted in Political Science

The History of Terrorism

From Antiquity to ISIS

Author: Gérard Chaliand,Arnaud Blin

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520292502

Category: History

Page: 536

View: 5149

First published in English in 2007 under title: The history of terrorism: from antiquity to al Qaeda.
Posted in History

Transnational Flows and Permissive Polities

Ethnographies of Human Mobilities in Asia

Author: Barak Kalir,Malini Sur

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9089644083

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 1805

This book is a collection of ethnographies of transnational migration and border crossings in Asia. Interdisciplinary in scope, it addresses issues of mobility and Diaspora from various vantage points. Unique to this volume is an emphasis of studying globalisation from below, privileging the narratives and views of “people on the move” – or the transnational underclass – and their sense of belonging to places and communities. The collection is further distinguished by its focus on the sources of authority and the social configurations that are created in the intersections between legality and illegality across Asia. Though previous studies on transnational flows have deconstructed the notion of nation-states as having fixed political boundaries, and have engaged in spaces beyond the nation-states, seldom has an entire region, Asia, been privileged in one integrated volume. We emphasize hitherto marginalized debates that have significant policy relevance. Other than a serious academic interest from lecturers and students, we are confident that book will be of significant interest for development practitioners and NGOs.
Posted in Social Science

Gringo Gulch

Sex, Tourism, and Social Mobility in Costa Rica

Author: Megan Rivers-Moore

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022637355X

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 1202

The story of sex tourism in the Gringo Gulch neighborhood of San José, Costa Rica could be easily cast as the exploitation of poor local women by privileged North American men—men who are in a position to take advantage of the vast geopolitical inequalities that make Latin American women into suppliers of low-cost sexual labor. But in Gringo Gulch, Megan Rivers-Moore tells a more nuanced story, demonstrating that all the actors intimately entangled in the sex tourism industry—sex workers, sex tourists, and the state—use it as a strategy for getting ahead. Rivers-Moore situates her ethnography at the intersections of gender, race, class, and national dimensions in the sex industry. Instead of casting sex workers as hapless victims and sex tourists as neoimperialist racists, she reveals each group as involved in a complicated process of class mobility that must be situated within the sale and purchase of leisure and sex. These interactions operate within an almost entirely unregulated but highly competitive market beyond the reach of the state—bringing a distinctly neoliberal cast to the market. Throughout the book, Rivers-Moore introduces us to remarkable characters—Susan, a mother of two who doesn’t regret her career of sex work; Barry, a teacher and father of two from Virginia who travels to Costa Rica to escape his loveless, sexless marriage; Nancy, a legal assistant in the Department of Labor who is shocked to find out that prostitution is legal and still unregulated. Gringo Gulch is a fascinating and groundbreaking look at sex tourism, Latin America, and the neoliberal state.
Posted in Social Science

A Sister's Memories

The Life and Work of Grace Abbott from the Writings of Her Sister, Edith Abbott

Author: Edith Abbott

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022620961X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 376

View: 484

This is the story of the American social worker, Grace Abbott (1878-1939), as told by her sister and social justice comrade, Edith Abbott (1876-1957). Edith recalls the Nebraska childhood, achievements, and struggles of her sister who, as head of the Immigrants' Protective League and the U.S. Children's Bureau, championed children's rights from the slums of Chicago to the villages of Appalachia.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Why Nations Fail

The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

Author: Daron Acemoglu,James A. Robinson

Publisher: Crown Books

ISBN: 0307719227

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 529

View: 6156

An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.
Posted in Business & Economics

Human Trafficking Is a Public Health Issue

A Paradigm Expansion in the United States

Author: Makini Chisolm-Straker,Hanni Stoklosa

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319478249

Category: Medical

Page: 457

View: 7702

This clear-sighted reference examines the public health dimensions of labor and sex trafficking in the United States, the scope of the crisis, and possibilities for solutions. Its ecological lifespan approach globally traces risk and protective factors associated with this exploitation, laying a roadmap towards its prevention. Diverse experts, including survivors, describe support and care interventions across domains and disciplines, from the law enforcement and judicial sectors to community health systems and NGOs, with a robust model for collaboration. By focusing on the humanity of trafficked persons, a public health paradigm broadens our understanding of and ability to address trafficking while adding critical direction and resources to the criminal justice and human rights structures currently in place. Among the topics covered: Children at Risk: Foster Care and Human Trafficking LGBTQ Youth and Vulnerability to Sex Trafficking“/li> Physical Health of Human Trafficking Survivors: Unmet Essentials Research Informing Advocacy: An Anti-Human Trafficking Tool Caring for Survivors Using a Trauma-Informed Care Framework The Media and Human Trafficking: Discussion and Critique of the Dominant Narrative Human Trafficking Is a Public Health Issue is a sobering read; a powerful call to action for public health professionals, including social workers and health care practitioners providing direct services, as well as the larger anti-trafficking community of advocates, prosecutors, taskforce members, law enforcement agents, officers, funders, and administrators. “An extraordinary collection of knowledge by survivors, academics, clinicians, and advocates who are experts on human trafficking. Human Trafficking is a Public Health Issue is a comprehensive offering in educating readers on human trafficking through a multi-pronged public health lens.” Margeaux Gray: Survivor, Advocate, Artist, Public Speaker
Posted in Medical

Drink

A Cultural History of Alcohol

Author: Iain Gately

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440631269

Category: Cooking

Page: 560

View: 1670

A spirited look at the history of alcohol, from the dawn of civilization to the modern day Alcohol is a fundamental part of Western culture. We have been drinking as long as we have been human, and for better or worse, alcohol has shaped our civilization. Drink investigates the history of this Jekyll and Hyde of fluids, tracing mankind's love/hate relationship with alcohol from ancient Egypt to the present day. Drink further documents the contribution of alcohol to the birth and growth of the United States, taking in the War of Independence, the Pennsylvania Whiskey revolt, the slave trade, and the failed experiment of national Prohibition. Finally, it provides a history of the world's most famous drinks-and the world's most famous drinkers. Packed with trivia and colorful characters, Drink amounts to an intoxicating history of the world.
Posted in Cooking

Trafficking and Prostitution Reconsidered

New Perspectives on Migration, Sex Work, and Human Rights

Author: Kamala Kempadoo,Jyoti Sanghera,Bandana Pattanaik

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317264517

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 8140

Since the 2005 publication of the highly acclaimed first edition of Trafficking and Prostitution Reconsidered, human trafficking has become virtually a household phrase. This new edition adds vitally important updates related to recent developments. A new introduction considers the term 'sex trafficking' and its growing use amongst feminist researchers. In a new chapter Ratna Kapur looks at changes in anti-trafficking legislation especially under the Obama administration. Jyoti Sanghera reports from her experience as a UN Human Rights commissioner and Bandana Pattanaik examines feminist participatory research on 'trafficking'. The book concludes with a list of relevant websites, organisations, and publications useful for students, researchers, and activists.
Posted in Social Science

Policing America’s Empire

The United States, the Philippines, and the Rise of the Surveillance State

Author: Alfred W. McCoy

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299234133

Category: History

Page: 759

View: 1075

At the dawn of the twentieth century, the U.S. Army swiftly occupied Manila and then plunged into a decade-long pacification campaign with striking parallels to today’s war in Iraq. Armed with cutting-edge technology from America’s first information revolution, the U.S. colonial regime created the most modern police and intelligence units anywhere under the American flag. In Policing America’s Empire Alfred W. McCoy shows how this imperial panopticon slowly crushed the Filipino revolutionary movement with a lethal mix of firepower, surveillance, and incriminating information. Even after Washington freed its colony and won global power in 1945, it would intervene in the Philippines periodically for the next half-century—using the country as a laboratory for counterinsurgency and rearming local security forces for repression. In trying to create a democracy in the Philippines, the United States unleashed profoundly undemocratic forces that persist to the present day. But security techniques bred in the tropical hothouse of colonial rule were not contained, McCoy shows, at this remote periphery of American power. Migrating homeward through both personnel and policies, these innovations helped shape a new federal security apparatus during World War I. Once established under the pressures of wartime mobilization, this distinctively American system of public-private surveillance persisted in various forms for the next fifty years, as an omnipresent, sub rosa matrix that honeycombed U.S. society with active informers, secretive civilian organizations, and government counterintelligence agencies. In each succeeding global crisis, this covert nexus expanded its domestic operations, producing new contraventions of civil liberties—from the harassment of labor activists and ethnic communities during World War I, to the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, all the way to the secret blacklisting of suspected communists during the Cold War. “With a breathtaking sweep of archival research, McCoy shows how repressive techniques developed in the colonial Philippines migrated back to the United States for use against people of color, aliens, and really any heterodox challenge to American power. This book proves Mark Twain’s adage that you cannot have an empire abroad and a republic at home.”—Bruce Cumings, University of Chicago “This book lays the Philippine body politic on the examination table to reveal the disease that lies within—crime, clandestine policing, and political scandal. But McCoy also draws the line from Manila to Baghdad, arguing that the seeds of controversial counterinsurgency tactics used in Iraq were sown in the anti-guerrilla operations in the Philippines. His arguments are forceful.”—Sheila S. Coronel, Columbia University “Conclusively, McCoy’s Policing America’s Empire is an impressive historical piece of research that appeals not only to Southeast Asianists but also to those interested in examining the historical embedding and institutional ontogenesis of post-colonial states’ police power apparatuses and their apparently inherent propensity to implement illiberal practices of surveillance and repression.”—Salvador Santino F. Regilme, Jr., Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs “McCoy’s remarkable book . . . does justice both to its author’s deep knowledge of Philippine history as well as to his rare expertise in unmasking the seamy undersides of state power.”—POLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review Winner, George McT. Kahin Prize, Southeast Asian Council of the Association for Asian Studies
Posted in History