Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll

The Rise of America’s 1960s Counterculture

Author: Robert C. Cottrell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442246073

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 6418

As the first full-bodied treatment of the American counterculture of the 1960s, Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n Roll traces its origins, discusses its most important figures, delves into iconic works, relates its ebb and flow, dissects the intersection of culture and politics, highlights millennial and apocalyptic sensibilities, and traces legacies.
Posted in History

Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll

The Rise of Americas 1960s Counterculture

Author: Robert C. Cottrell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781442246065

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 5602

As the first full-bodied treatment of the American counterculture of the 1960s,Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll traces its origins, discusses its most important figures, delves into iconic works, relates its ebb and flow, dissects the intersection of culture and politics, highlights millennial and apocalyptic sensibilities, and traces legacies.
Posted in History

Power to the People

The Graphic Design of the Radical Press and the Rise of the Counter-Culture, 1964-1974

Author: Geoff Kaplan

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226424375

Category: Art

Page: 264

View: 5708

Though we think of the 1960s and the early ‘70s as a time of radical social, cultural, and political upheaval, we tend to picture the action as happening on campuses and in the streets. Yet the rise of the underground newspaper was equally daring and original. Thanks to advances in cheap offset printing, groups involved in antiwar, civil rights, and other social liberation issues began to spread their messages through provocatively designed newspapers and broadsheets. This vibrant new media was essential to the counterculture revolution as a whole—helping to motivate the masses and proliferate ideas. Power to the People presents more than 700 full-color images and excerpts from these astonishing publications, many of which have not been seen since they were first published almost fifty years ago. From the psychedelic pages of the Oracle, Haight-Ashbury’s paper of choice, to the fiery editorials of the Black Panther Party Paper, these papers were remarkable for their editors’ fervent belief in freedom of expression and their DIY philosophy. They were also extraordinary for their graphic innovations. Experimental typography and wildly inventive layouts reflect an alternative media culture as much informed by the space age, television, and socialism as it was by the great trinity of sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll. Assembled by renowned graphic designer Geoff Kaplan, Power to the People pays homage in its layout to the radical press. Beyond its unparalleled images, Power to the People includes essays by Gwen Allen, Bob Ostertag, and Fred Turner, as well as a series of recollections edited by Pamela M. Lee, all of which comment on the critical impact of the alternative press in the social and popular movements of those turbulent years. Power to the People treats the design practices of that moment as activism in its own right that offers a vehement challenge to the dominance of official media and a critical form of self-representation. No other book surveys in such variety the highly innovative graphic design of the underground press, and certainly no other book captures the era with such an unmatched eye toward its aesthetic and look. Power to the People is not just a major compendium of art from the ’60s and ’70s—it showcases how the radical media graphically fashioned the image of a countercultural revolution that still resounds to this day.
Posted in Art

The 00individual Counter-Culture Compendium 1960's and 1970's Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll Volume 1 - The 1960s

Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll

Author: 00individual

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780997915914

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 5418

The Compendium's use of classic and historic music and rock concert reviews serve as time stamps and reflections of the '60's era. Consciousness was raised, cultures and generations clashed, creativity was ubiquitous, the Vietnam War was protested, love was free, and Rock 'n' Roll Ruled! Archived by an L.A. eyewitness who lived the era.
Posted in Social Science

Hippies: A Guide to an American Subculture

A Guide to an American Subculture

Author: Micah Lee Issitt

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313365733

Category: Social Science

Page: 164

View: 1288

An insightful introduction to hippie culture and how its revolutionary principles in the 1960s helped shape modern culture. • Includes 13 primary sources, including excerpts from articles, speeches, and original interviews, and Abbie Hoffman's trial interview • Presents original photography by acclaimed photographer Robert Altman, providing views of hippies at the height of 1960s culture
Posted in Social Science

Sticky Fingers

The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone Magazine

Author: Joe Hagan

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101874384

Category: Music

Page: 560

View: 2910

A delicious romp through the heyday of rock and roll and a revealing portrait of the man at the helm of the iconic magazine that made it all possible, with candid look backs at the era from Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Elton John, Bono, Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, and others. The story of Jann Wenner, Rolling Stone's founder, editor, and publisher, and the pioneering era he helped curate, is told here for the first time in glittering, glorious detail. Joe Hagan provides readers with a backstage pass to storied concert venues and rock-star hotel rooms; he tells never before heard stories about the lives of rock stars and their handlers; he details the daring journalism (Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, P.J. O’Rourke) and internecine office politics that accompanied the start-up; he animates the drug and sexual appetites of the era; and he reports on the politics of the last fifty years that were often chronicled in the pages of Rolling Stone magazine. Supplemented by a cache of extraordinary documents and letters from Wenner's personal archives, Sticky Fingers depicts an ambitious, mercurial, wide-eyed rock and roll fan of who exalts in youth and beauty and learns how to package it, marketing late sixties counterculture as a testament to the power of American youth. The result is a fascinating and complex portrait of man and era, and an irresistible biography of popular culture, celebrity, music, and politics in America.
Posted in Music

The Hippies

A 1960s History

Author: John Anthony Moretta

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786499494

Category: History

Page: 428

View: 6060

"In this extremely treatise on the vast reaches and deep roots of a defining movement, Moretta offers a probing and potent work of cultural anthropology that captures the essence of the youthful energy that changed a nation and influenced the world"--Booklist. Among the most significant subcultures in modern U.S. history, the hippies had a far-reaching impact. Their influence essentially defined the 1960s--hippie antifashion, divergent music, dropout politics and "make love not war" philosophy extended to virtually every corner of the world and remain influential. The political and cultural institutions that the hippies challenged, or abandoned, mainly prevailed. Yet the nonviolent, egalitarian hippie principles led an era of civic protest that brought an end to the Vietnam War. Their enduring impact was the creation of a 1960s frame of reference among millions of baby boomers, whose attitudes and aspirations continue to reflect the hip ethos of their youth.
Posted in History

Acid Dreams

The Complete Social History of LSD: The CIA, the Sixties, and Beyond

Author: Martin A. Lee,Bruce Shlain

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 0802196063

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 2748

“An engrossing account” of the history of LSD, the psychedelic 1960s, and the clandestine mind games of the CIA (William Burroughs). Beginning with the discovery of LSD in 1943, this “monumental social history of psychedelia” tracks the most potent drug known to science—from its use by the government during the paranoia of the Cold War to its spill-over into a revolutionary antiestablishment recreation during the Vietnam War—setting the stage for one of the great ideological battles of the decade (The Village Voice). In the intervening years, the CIA launched a massive covert research program in the hope that LSD would serve as an espionage weapon; psychiatric pioneers came to believe that acid would shed light on the perplexing problems of mental illness; and a new generation of writers and artists in countercultural transition sought to break the “mind-forged manacles” of a new generation in rebellion—among them, Timothy Leary, Ken Kesey, the Beatles, Allen Ginsberg, William Mellon Hitchcock, and Abbie Hoffman. Painting an indelible portrait of an unforgettable era and using startling information obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, Acid Dreams also exposes one of the most bizarre, shocking, and often tragic episodes in American history. “An important historical synthesis of the spread and effects of a drug that served as a central metaphor for an era.” —John Sayles “Marvelously detailed . . . loaded with startling revelations.” —Los Angeles Daily News
Posted in Social Science

God's Forever Family

The Jesus People Movement in America

Author: Larry Eskridge

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0195326458

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 3009

The Jesus People were an unlikely combination of evangelical Christianity and the hippie counterculture. God's Forever Family is the first major examination of this phenomenon in over thirty years.
Posted in Religion

Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women

Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South

Author: Blain Roberts

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469614200

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 8683

Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women: Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South
Posted in History

Droppers

America's First Hippie Commune, Drop City

Author: Mark Matthews

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 080618308X

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 933

Sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll. In popular imagination, these words seem to capture the atmosphere of 1960s hippie communes. Yet when the first hippie commune was founded in 1965 outside Trinidad, Colorado, the goal wasn’t one long party but rather a new society that integrated life and art. In Droppers, Mark Matthews chronicles the rise and fall of this utopian community, exploring the goals behind its creation and the factors that eventually led to its dissolution. Seeking refuge from enforced social conformity, the turmoil of racial conflict, and the Vietnam War, artist Eugene Bernofsky and other founders of Drop City sought to create an environment that would promote both equality and personal autonomy. These high ideals became increasingly hard to sustain, however, in the face of external pressures and internal divisions. In a rollicking, fast-paced style, Matthews vividly describes the early enthusiasm of Drop City’s founders, as Bernofsky and his friends constructed a town in the desert literally using the “detritus of society.” Over time, Drop City suffered from media attention, the distraction of visitors, and the arrival of new residents who didn’t share the founders’ ideals. Matthews bases his account on numerous interviews with Bernofsky and other residents as well as written sources. Explaining Drop City in the context of the counterculture’s evolution and the American tradition of utopian communities, he paints an unforgettable picture of a largely misunderstood phenomenon in American history.
Posted in History

The Common Good

Author: Robert B. Reich

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 052552049X

Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Page: 208

View: 8326

"...Clear-eyed manifesto for re-centering our economics and politics on the idea of the common good. Robert B. Reich...demonstrates that a common good not only exists but in fact constitutes the very essence of any society or nation...We must weigh the moral obligations of citizenship and carefully consider how we as a country should relate to honor, shame, patriotism, truth, and the meaning of leadership...A fundamental statement about the purpose of society and a cri de coeur to save American soul."--Dust jacket flap.
Posted in BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Dylan Goes Electric!

Newport, Seeger, Dylan, and the Night that Split the Sixties

Author: Elijah Wald

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 006236670X

Category: Music

Page: 368

View: 8663

One of the music world’s pre-eminent critics takes a fresh and much-needed look at the day Dylan “went electric” at the Newport Folk Festival, timed to coincide with the event’s fiftieth anniversary. On the evening of July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan took the stage at Newport Folk Festival, backed by an electric band, and roared into his new rock hit, Like a Rolling Stone. The audience of committed folk purists and political activists who had hailed him as their acoustic prophet reacted with a mix of shock, booing, and scattered cheers. It was the shot heard round the world—Dylan’s declaration of musical independence, the end of the folk revival, and the birth of rock as the voice of a generation—and one of the defining moments in twentieth-century music. In Dylan Goes Electric!, Elijah Wald explores the cultural, political and historical context of this seminal event that embodies the transformative decade that was the sixties. Wald delves deep into the folk revival, the rise of rock, and the tensions between traditional and groundbreaking music to provide new insights into Dylan’s artistic evolution, his special affinity to blues, his complex relationship to the folk establishment and his sometime mentor Pete Seeger, and the ways he reshaped popular music forever. Breaking new ground on a story we think we know, Dylan Goes Electric! is a thoughtful, sharp appraisal of the controversial event at Newport and a nuanced, provocative, analysis of why it matters.
Posted in Music

All Dressed Up

The Sixties and the Counter-culture

Author: Jonathon Green

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: 482

View: 8203

This account expands upon the author's previous Days in the Life to provide a fascinating and controversial overview of the cultural and political events of the 1960s. Green's starting point is the invention of the teenager, Teds, Beats and CND; he finishes with the Oz trial, the women's movement and gay politics. In between, his focus is on the whole panoply of that extraordinary decade, from sex, drugs and rock'n'roll to student protests. He also surveys the anti-Vietnam movement, and the radical social legislation pioneered by Roy Jenkins - on abortion, obscenity, homosexuality and capital punishment. The underground press, the Arts Lab, Swinging London, anti-psychiatry, the hippie trail, the festivals, the drug busts, all fall under an affectionate but critical eye, celebrating the prevailing optimism of the decade without being blind to its absurdities.
Posted in Great Britain

Everybody Had an Ocean

Music and Mayhem in 1960s Los Angeles

Author: William McKeen

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613734948

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4535

Los Angeles in the 1960s gave the world some of the greatest music in rock 'n' roll history: "California Dreamin'" by the Mamas and the Papas, "Mr. Tambourine Man" by the Byrds, and "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys, a song that magnificently summarized the joy and beauty of the era in three-and-a-half minutes. But there was a dark flip side to the fun fun fun of the music, a nexus between naïve young musicians and the fringe elements that exploited the decade's peace-love-and-flowers ethos, all fueled by sex, drugs, and overnight success. One surf music superstar unwittingly subsidized the kidnapping of Frank Sinatra Jr. The transplanted Texas singer Bobby Fuller might have been murdered by the Mob in what is still an unsolved case. And after hearing Charlie Manson sing, Neil Young recommended him to the president of Warner Bros. Records. Manson's ultimate rejection by the music industry likely led to the infamous murders that shocked a nation. Everybody Had an Ocean chronicles the migration of the rock 'n' roll business to Southern California and how the artists flourished there. The cast of characters is astonishing—Brian and Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, Jan and Dean, eccentric producer Phil Spector, Cass Elliot, Sam Cooke, Ike and Tina Turner, Joni Mitchell, and scores of others—and their stories form a modern epic of the battles between innocence and cynicism and joy and terror. You'll never hear that beautiful music in quite the same way.
Posted in History

The Republic of Rock

Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture

Author: Michael J. Kramer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199987351

Category: Music

Page: 352

View: 6857

In his 1967 megahit "San Francisco," Scott McKenzie sang of "people in motion" coming from all across the country to San Francisco, the white-hot center of rock music and anti-war protests. At the same time, another large group of young Americans was also in motion, less eagerly, heading for the jungles of Vietnam. Now, in The Republic of Rock, Michael Kramer draws on new archival sources and interviews to explore sixties music and politics through the lens of these two generation-changing places--San Francisco and Vietnam. From the Acid Tests of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters to hippie disc jockeys on strike, the military's use of rock music to "boost morale" in Vietnam, and the forgotten tale of a South Vietnamese rock band, The Republic of Rock shows how the musical connections between the City of the Summer of Love and war-torn Southeast Asia were crucial to the making of the sixties counterculture. The book also illustrates how and why the legacy of rock music in the sixties continues to matter to the meaning of citizenship in a global society today. Going beyond clichéd narratives about sixties music, Kramer argues that rock became a way for participants in the counterculture to think about what it meant to be an American citizen, a world citizen, a citizen-consumer, or a citizen-soldier. The music became a resource for grappling with the nature of democracy in larger systems of American power both domestically and globally. For anyone interested in the 1960s, popular music, and American culture and counterculture, The Republic of Rock offers new insight into the many ways rock music has shaped our ideas of individual freedom and collective belonging.
Posted in Music

John Bidwell and California

The Life and Writings of a Pioneer, 1841-1900

Author: John Bidwell

Publisher: Arthur H Clark

ISBN: 9780870623165

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 8191

Posted in History

Hackers

Heroes of the Computer Revolution - 25th Anniversary Edition

Author: Steven Levy

Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."

ISBN: 9781449393748

Category: Computers

Page: 520

View: 6814

This 25th anniversary edition of Steven Levy's classic book traces the exploits of the computer revolution's original hackers -- those brilliant and eccentric nerds from the late 1950s through the early '80s who took risks, bent the rules, and pushed the world in a radical new direction. With updated material from noteworthy hackers such as Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Stallman, and Steve Wozniak, Hackers is a fascinating story that begins in early computer research labs and leads to the first home computers. Levy profiles the imaginative brainiacs who found clever and unorthodox solutions to computer engineering problems. They had a shared sense of values, known as "the hacker ethic," that still thrives today. Hackers captures a seminal period in recent history when underground activities blazed a trail for today's digital world, from MIT students finagling access to clunky computer-card machines to the DIY culture that spawned the Altair and the Apple II.
Posted in Computers

Season of the Witch

Enchantment, Terror and Deliverance in the City of Love

Author: David Talbot

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439127872

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 2641

Salon founder David Talbot chronicles the cultural history of San Francisco and from the late 1960s to the early 1980s when figures such as Harvey Milk, Janis Joplin, Jim Jones, and Bill Walsh helped usher from backwater city to thriving metropolis.
Posted in History

Rethinking the American Anti-War Movement

Author: Simon Hall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136599185

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 661

Between 1965 and 1973, hundreds of thousands of ordinary Americans participated in one of the most remarkable and significant people's movements in American history. Through marches, rallies, draft resistance, teach-ins, civil disobedience, and non-violent demonstrations at both the national and local levels, Americans vehemently protested the country's involvement in the Vietnam War. Rethinking the American Anti-War Movement provides a short, accessible overview of this important social and political movement, highlighting key events and key figures, the movement's strengths and weaknesses, how it intersected with other social and political movements of the time, and its lasting effect on the country. The book is perfect for anyone wanting to obtain an introduction to the Anti-War movement of the twentieth century.
Posted in History