Sapelo

People and Place on a Georgia Sea Island

Author: Buddy Sullivan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780820350165

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 6977

"Sapelo will be a resource to both scholars and general readers wishing to know more about the island's history. The book uses both primary and secondary sources to paint a picture of the island's many dimensions and discrete periods (e.g. ecological, Native American, Spanish mission, antebellum plantation, African-American, and twentieth century)"--
Posted in History

Sapelo's People

A Long Walk Into Freedom

Author: William S. McFeely

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393313772

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 8341

Describes the experiences of the forebears of the Black inhabitants of Sapelo, an island off the coast of Georgia
Posted in History

Sapelo Island

Author: Buddy Sullivan

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738505954

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 5831

The barrier islands of the south Atlantic coastline have for years held a deep attraction for all who have come into contact with them. Few, however, can compare with the mystique of Sapelo Island, Georgia. This unique semitropical paradise evokes a time long forgotten, when antebellum cotton plantations dominated her landscape, all worked by hundreds of black slaves, the descendants of whom have lived in quiet solitude on the island for generations. For more than 50 years of the twentieth century, two millionaires held sway on Sapelo, and it is their story, interwoven with that of the island's residents, that unfolds within the pages of this book. Almost 200 photographs provide testimony to the dynamic forces and energies implanted upon Sapelo by two men, Howard E. Coffin, a Detroit automotive pioneer, and Richard J. Reynolds Jr., heir to a huge North Carolina tobacco fortune. Beginning with a photographic essay about Sapelo's antebellum plantation owner, Thomas Spalding, Sapelo Island moves into the primary focus of the story, the years from 1912 to 1964, an era of grandeur that has left a rich photographic legacy.
Posted in History

Island Time

An Illustrated History of St. Simons Island, Georgia

Author: Jingle Davis

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820342459

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 7597

Capturing the history and beauty of a key destination in the land of the Golden Isles... Eighty miles south of Savannah lies St. Simons Island, one of the most beloved seaside destinations in Georgia and home to some twenty thousand year-round residents. In Island Time, Jingle Davis and Benjamin Galland offer a fascinating history and stunning visual celebration of this coastal community. Prehistoric people established some of North America's first permanent settlements on St. Simons, leaving three giant shell rings as evidence of their occupation. People from other diverse cultures also left their mark: Mocama and Guale Indians, Spanish friars, pirates and privateers, British soldiers and settlers, German religious refugees, and aristocratic antebellum planters. Enslaved Africans and their descendants forged the unique Gullah Geechee culture that survives today. Davis provides a comprehensive history of St. Simons, connecting its stories to broader historical moments. Timbers for Old Ironsides were hewn from St. Simons's live oaks during the Revolutionary War. Aaron Burr fled to St. Simons after killing Alexander Hamilton. Susie Baker King Taylor became the first black person to teach openly in a freedmen's school during her stay on the island. Rachel Carson spent time on St. Simons, which she wrote about in The Edge of the Sea. The island became a popular tourist destination in the 1800s, with visitors arriving on ferries until a causeway opened in 1924. Davis describes the challenges faced by the community with modern growth and explains how St. Simons has retained the unique charm and strong sense of community that it is known for today. Featuring more than two hundred contemporary photographs, historical images, and maps, Island Time is an essential book for people interested in the Georgia coast. A Friends Fund publication.
Posted in Travel

Altamaha

A River and Its Keeper

Author: N.A

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820343129

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 4313

Formed by the confluence of the Ocmulgee and Oconee Rivers, the Altamaha is the largest free-flowing river on the East Coast and drains its third-largest watershed. It has been designated as one of the Nature Conservancy's seventy-five Last Great Places because of its unique character and rich natural diversity. In evocative photography and elegant prose, Altamaha captures the distinctive beauty of this river and offers a portrait of the man who has become its improbable guardian. Few people know the Altamaha better than James Holland. Raised in Cochran, Georgia, Holland spent years on the river fishing, hunting, and working its coastal reaches as a commercial crabber. Witnessing a steady decline in blue crab stocks, Holland doggedly began to educate himself on the area's environmental and political issues, reaching a deep conviction that the only way to preserve the way of life he loved was to protect the river and its watershed. In 1999, he began serving as the first Altamaha Riverkeeper, finding new purpose in protecting the river and raising awareness about its plight with people in his community and beyond. At first Holland used photography to document pollution and abuse, but as he came to appreciate and understand the Altamaha in new ways, his photographs evolved, focusing more on the natural beauty he fought to save. More than 230 color photographs capture the area's majestic landscapes and stunning natural diversity, including a generous selection of some the 234 species of rare plants and animals in the region. In their essays, Janisse Ray offers a profile of Holland's transformation from orphan and troubled high school dropout to river advocate, and Dorinda G. Dallmeyer celebrates the biological richness and cultural heritage that the Altamaha offers to all Georgians.
Posted in Nature

God, Dr. Buzzard, and the Bolito Man

Author: Cornelia Walker Bailey

Publisher: Anchor Books

ISBN: 0385493770

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 6925

Tells the story of how Sapelo island, now populated by the descendants of slaves, found itself locked in conflict with the state of Georgia while struggling to preserve its rich African American cultural heritage.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Sapelo Island's Hog Hammock

Author: Michele Nicole Johnson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738568478

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 3258

Hog Hammock, located on Georgia's Sapelo Island, is only accessible by ferry or private boat. It is one of the last island-based Gullah-Geechee communities in America--a living connection to West African languages, folkways, and spiritual traditions. With its dirt roads and tin-roofed houses, Hog Hammock is the site of a social hall, two historic Baptist churches, and a former schoolhouse, all built by descendants of slaves. The nearby Behavior Cemetery has burial sites that date back 200 years. Much has been written about the people of Hog Hammock and Sapelo Island, mostly documenting their lives as slaves and then as landowning free people working for millionaires who reshaped Sapelo Island into their own personal retreats. But there is another part of the island's story, one filled with entrepreneurs, skilled craftsmen, and community leaders, that is told here in Images of America: Sapelo Island's Hog Hammock.
Posted in History

African American Life in the Georgia Lowcountry

The Atlantic World and the Gullah Geechee

Author: Philip Morgan

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820342742

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7431

The lush landscape and subtropical climate of the Georgia coast only enhance the air of mystery enveloping some of its inhabitants--people who owe, in some ways, as much to Africa as to America. As the ten previously unpublished essays in this volume examine various aspects of Georgia lowcountry life, they often engage a central dilemma: the region's physical and cultural remoteness helps to preserve the venerable ways of its black inhabitants, but it can also marginalize the vital place of lowcountry blacks in the Atlantic World. The essays, which range in coverage from the founding of the Georgia colony in the early 1700s through the present era, explore a range of topics, all within the larger context of the Atlantic world. Included are essays on the double-edged freedom that the American Revolution made possible to black women, the lowcountry as site of the largest gathering of African Muslims in early North America, and the coexisting worlds of Christianity and conjuring in coastal Georgia and the links (with variations) to African practices. A number of fascinating, memorable characters emerge, among them the defiant Mustapha Shaw, who felt entitled to land on Ossabaw Island and resisted its seizure by whites only to become embroiled in struggles with other blacks; Betty, the slave woman who, in the spirit of the American Revolution, presented a "list of grievances" to her master; and S'Quash, the Arabic-speaking Muslim who arrived on one of the last legal transatlantic slavers and became a head man on a North Carolina plantation. Published in association with the Georgia Humanities Council.
Posted in Social Science

Common Birds of Coastal Georgia

Author: Jim Wilson

Publisher: Wormsloe Foundation Publications

ISBN: 9780820338286

Category: Nature

Page: 219

View: 7759

Ideal for amateur birders, nature enthusiasts, and visitors to the Atlantic coast, this guide presents 103 species of birds commonly seen on the beaches and in the marsh and inland areas of Georgia's coastal region. The guide features large color photographs for easy and immediate identification and is divided into three sections that reflect distinct types of coastal habitats--backyards, ponds and marshes, and shore and ocean. Within these three sections, the species are arranged by size of bird, from smaller birds, such as painted buntings, to larger ones, such as brown pelicans. Information for each bird species includes common and scientific names, distinguishing marks and characteristics, and descriptions of bird calls, typical habitats, and nesting and feeding behaviors. Accounts also show variations in plumage according to sex, age, and season. A perfect companion for residents and visitors alike, Common Birds of Coastal Georgia also serves as an excellent introduction to birding, bird identification, and conservation.
Posted in Nature

Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater

A New Revised Edition

Author: Buddy Sullivan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781483593593

Category:

Page: 1000

View: 3293

Author Buddy Sullivan's "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater: A New Revised Edition" represents a complete recasting of a book issued under the same title in 1990, and reprinted five times. Sullivan is a prominent coastal Georgia historian and lecturer with nineteen titles to his credit. This new edition of "Early Days" incorporates all the material in the original version, in addition to considerable new information based on the author’s recent research. Additionally, the new "Early Days" has been reformatted to reflect improved chapter sequence and content to provide a smoother, more continuous narrative flow than that of the original edition. In essence, the revised edition is a completely new book that will be of improved utility to researchers, students, and the general reader. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is a comprehensive history of Sapelo Island, Darien and McIntosh County, Georgia, as well as a general overview of the history of coastal Georgia, focusing on Glynn, Liberty and Bryan counties, Savannah, and St. Simons and St. Catherines islands. It covers the full scope of coastal history: Guale Indians, Spanish missionaries, and early settlement by English colonists; the rice and cotton economy during the plantation era built upon the labors of enslaved peop≤ Civil War events, including the controversial burning of Darien; the timber industry, and the associated shipping activity that made Darien a leading center for the export of pine lumber for forty years; the emerging commercial oyster and shrimping fisheries; and the impact of millionaires, scientists and resident African Americans on the 20th century history of the region, especially Sapelo Island. Significantly, the new edition of "Early Days" relates the story of the area’s African American communities, particularly the developing Geechee settlements at Sapelo, Harris Neck and Darien in the years from the end of the Civil War through the 20th century. The author’s thematic approach is that of establishing the important connection between the ecology of the area with its history. This recurring theme will be apparent throughout the book in an analysis of just how people utilized the environmental circumstances unique to their region and adapted them to virtually every aspect of their lives and livelihood for 300 years. "Early Days" is thus essentially a story of land use and landscape: soils, tides, salt marshes, river hydrology, weather, and how these conditions impacted the agricultural, commercial and social development of the region. Of equal significance is the use people have made of the tidal waterways and fresh-water river systems, giving the new edition a distinctly maritime flavor. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is documented through source notes and an expanded index, and includes photographs of places and people, and localized maps that provide the geographical context necessary for an understanding of the economic, maritime and cultural dynamics of the coast.
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Island Passages

An Illustrated History of Jekyll Island, Georgia

Author: Jingle Davis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780820348698

Category:

Page: 288

View: 8929

Posted in

Gullah Culture in America

Author: Wilbur Cross

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275994501

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 3709

Gullah-an African English hybrid language-has been spoken by people of African descent in the U.S. for 400 years, and is growing in its social, cultural, and historical influence.
Posted in History

Kid Carolina

R. J. Reynolds Jr., a Tobacco Fortune, and the Mysterious Death of a Southern Icon

Author: Heidi Schnakenberg

Publisher: Center Street

ISBN: 1599952696

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 401

The Reynolds tobacco family was an American dynasty like the Rockefellers, Vanderbilts, and Astors. R.J. "Dick" Reynolds Jr. was born into privilege and decadence, but his disastrous personal life eventually destroyed almost every relationship he cherished and stole his health at a relatively young age. Dick Reynolds was dubbed "Kid Carolina" when as a teenager, he ran away from home and stowed away as part of the crew on a freighter. For the rest of his life he'd turn to the sea, instead of his friends and family, for comfort. Dick disappeared for months at a time, leading the dual life of a business mogul and troubled soul, both of which became legendary. Despite his personal demons, Dick played a pivotal role in shaping twentieth-century America through his business savvy and politics. He developed Delta and Eastern Airlines, single handedly secured FDR's third term election, and served as mayor of Winston-Salem, where his tobacco fortune was built. Yet below the gilded surface lay a turbulent life of alcoholism, infidelity, and loneliness. His chaotic existence culminated in a surprise fourth marriage and was shortly followed by a strange death, the end of a life every bit as awe-inspiring as it was disturbing.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Water Is Wide

A Memoir

Author: Pat Conroy

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453203907

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 310

View: 3128

New York Times Bestseller: The “miraculous” memoir of an inspiring teacher and the students who changed his life on an impoverished South Carolina island (Newsweek). Though the children of Yamacraw Island live less than two miles from the southern mainland, they can’t name the US president or the ocean that surrounds them. Most can’t read or write. Many of the students are the descendants of slaves, handicapped by poverty and isolation. When Pat Conroy arrives, an eager young teacher at the height of the civil rights movement, he finds a community still bound by the bitter effects of racism, but he is determined to broaden its members’ horizons and give them a voice. In this poignant memoir, which Newsweek called “an experience of joy,” the New York Times–bestselling author of The Prince of Tides plumbs his experiences as a young teacher on an isolated South Carolina island to reveal the shocking inequalities of the American education system.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Environmental Influences on Life & Labor in Mcintosh County, Georgia

Case Studies in Ecology As History With a Personal Memoir of the Tidewater

Author: Buddy Sullivan

Publisher: Bookbaby

ISBN: 9781543925159

Category: History

Page: 828

View: 5265

Few places on the U.S. eastern seaboard better exemplify the economic and societal utilization of a local ecosystem by human populations than the tidewater sections of South Carolina and Georgia. For four centuries Euro-and-Afro-centric cultures in the region have adapted to their particular environmental circumstances--salt marsh ecosystem, fresh water and tidal systems and their hydrology, soil fertility, and meteorological considerations, among other prevailing conditions--to enhance their lifestyles and economies. An antebellum agrarian economy, interwoven with a distinct maritime culture, all linked to the land and water resources of the region, has spanned more than two centuries, and is set against the fascinating backdrop of coastal history. The ecology as history in this book resonates with a recurrent theme, one that relates the story of community, particularly that which involves the use of its land, its economy and the dynamics of its labor, from the perspective of the local environment. The twelve "case studies" in this book examine the unique correlation between the ecosystem and environment of the Georgia tidewater in association with the dynamics of economics and culture. In this regard, one area is scrutinized as a microcosm of the south Atlantic coast, McIntosh County, Georgia. This is a story of land use in association with the intangibles of place and permanence--and by extension, perseverance--as they relate to McIntosh County. It is a story that is applicable to all of coastal Georgia and lower South Carolina. It is argued that the human occupants of the county simultaneously adapted to the ecological circumstances of their locale while utilizing local environmental conditions as an increasingly effective, and resourceful, means of furthering their economic and cultural well-being. The relevance of a communal and cultural sense of place is an important blended theme, as is the significance of the applied scientific research relating to the ecosystem that has evolved since the 1950s in determining the effects of ecology on human life-ways.
Posted in History

Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands

Author: N.A

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820323893

Category: Music

Page: 256

View: 1491

A valuable collection of folk music and lore from the Gullah culture, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands preserves the rich traditions of slave descendants on the barrier islands of Georgia by interweaving their music with descriptions of their language, religious and social customs, and material culture. Collected over a period of nearly twenty-five years by Lydia Parrish, the sixty folk songs and attendant lore included in this book are evidence of antebellum traditions kept alive in the relatively isolated coastal regions of Georgia. Over the years, Parrish won the confidence of many of the African-American singers, not only collecting their songs but also discovering other elements of traditional culture that formed the context of those songs. When it was first published in 1942, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands contained much material that had not previously appeared in print. The songs are grouped in categories, including African survival songs; shout songs; ring-play, dance, and fiddle songs; and religious and work songs. In additions to the lyrics and melodies, Slave Songs includes Lydia Parrish's explanatory notes, character sketches of her informants, anecdotes, and a striking portfolio of photographs. Reproduced in its original oversized format, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands will inform and delight students and scholars of African-American culture and folklore as well as folk music enthusiasts.
Posted in Music

Enchanted Kingdom

A Fairy-tale Coloring Book

Author: Kimberly Kay

Publisher: Plain Sight

ISBN: 9781462119066

Category: Games

Page: N.A

View: 9886

Posted in Games