Rethinking the Color Line

Readings in Race and Ethnicity

Author: Charles A. Gallagher

Publisher: SAGE Publications, Incorporated

ISBN: 9781506394138

Category: Social Science

Page: 600

View: 3781

Charles A. Gallagher’s best-selling reader is now with SAGE Publishing! User-friendly without sacrificing intellectual or theoretical rigor, this popular anthology for race and ethnic relations courses introduces students to classic statements, contemporary favorites, and works by early career scholars. Rethinking the Color Line helps make sense of how race and ethnicity influence aspects of social life in ways that are often made invisible by culture, politics, and economics. The readings reflect a variety of approaches to studying race and ethnicity: a focus on specific minority groups; two or more groups in comparative perspective; and topics that look at the experience of many groups historically and within social institutions. Readers will see how they influence and in turn are influenced by race and ethnic relations. The new Sixth Edition has been thoroughly revised, with 18 new selections addressing topics that reflect the current debates and state of contemporary U.S. race relations, including: Current representations of Arabs and Muslims in the media Links among racial discrimination, stress, and public health outcomes How skin bleaching and cosmetic surgery are used to acquire racial “capital” The rising racial wealth gap How the race of drug users can turn a “crime” problem into a “public health” problem How race shapes immigration policies Home DNA ancestry tests and the blurring of existing racial boundaries
Posted in Social Science

Two-faced racism

Whites in the backstage and frontstage

Author: Leslie Houts Picca,Joe R. Feagin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780415954761

Category: Drama

Page: 284

View: 7516

Two-Faced Racismexamines and explains the racial attitudes and behaviours exhibited by whites in private settings. While there are many books that deal with public attitudes, behaviours, and incidences concerning race and racism (frontstage), there are few studies on the attitudes whites display among friends, family, and other whites in private settings (backstage). The core of this book draws upon 626 journals of racial events kept by white college students at& twenty-eight colleges in the United States. The book seeks to comprehend how whites think in racial terms by analyzing their reported racial events.
Posted in Drama

Racism without Racists

Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America

Author: Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 144227624X

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 1698

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s acclaimed Racism without Racists is a provocative book that explodes the belief that America is now a color-blind society. The fifth edition includes a new chapter addressing what readers can do to confront racism, new material on the racial climate post-Obama, new coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement, and more.
Posted in Social Science

The First R

How Children Learn Race and Racism

Author: Debra Van Ausdale,Joe R. Feagin

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847688623

Category: Social Science

Page: 231

View: 5110

A remarkable study revealing that answers might be more startling than could be imagined.
Posted in Social Science

Handbook of the Sociology of Racial and Ethnic Relations

Author: Pinar Batur,Joe R. Feagin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319767577

Category: Social Science

Page: 434

View: 4732

The study of racial and ethnic relations has become one of the most written about aspects in sociology and sociological research. In both North America and Europe, many "traditional" cultures are feeling threatened by immigrants from Latin America, Africa and Asia. This handbook is a true international collaboration looking at racial and ethnic relations from an academic perspective. It starts from the principle that sociology is at the hub of the human sciences concerned with racial and ethnic relations.
Posted in Social Science

The Social Life of DNA

Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome

Author: Alondra Nelson

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807033022

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 5426

The unexpected story of how genetic testing is affecting race in America We know DNA is a master key that unlocks medical and forensic secrets, but its genealogical life is both revelatory and endlessly fascinating. Tracing genealogy is now the second-most popular hobby amongst Americans, as well as the second-most visited online category. This billion-dollar industry has spawned popular television shows, websites, and Internet communities, and a booming heritage tourism circuit. The tsunami of interest in genetic ancestry tracing from the African American community has been especially overwhelming. In The Social Life of DNA, Alondra Nelson takes us on an unprecedented journey into how the double helix has wound its way into the heart of the most urgent contemporary social issues around race. For over a decade, Nelson has deeply studied this phenomenon. Artfully weaving together keenly observed interactions with root-seekers alongside illuminating historical details and revealing personal narrative, she shows that genetic genealogy is a new tool for addressing old and enduring issues. In The Social Life of DNA, she explains how these cutting-edge DNA-based techniques are being used in myriad ways, including grappling with the unfinished business of slavery: to foster reconciliation, to establish ties with African ancestral homelands, to rethink and sometimes alter citizenship, and to make legal claims for slavery reparations specifically based on ancestry. Nelson incisively shows that DNA is a portal to the past that yields insight for the present and future, shining a light on social traumas and historical injustices that still resonate today. Science can be a crucial ally to activism to spur social change and transform twenty-first-century racial politics. But Nelson warns her readers to be discerning: for the social repair we seek can’t be found in even the most sophisticated science. Engrossing and highly original, The Social Life of DNA is a must-read for anyone interested in race, science, history and how our reckoning with the past may help us to chart a more just course for tomorrow. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Social Science

Not Quite White

White Trash and the Boundaries of Whiteness

Author: Matt Wray

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822388596

Category: Social Science

Page: 228

View: 8065

White trash. The phrase conjures up images of dirty rural folk who are poor, ignorant, violent, and incestuous. But where did this stigmatizing phrase come from? And why do these stereotypes persist? Matt Wray answers these and other questions by delving into the long history behind this term of abuse and others like it. Ranging from the early 1700s to the early 1900s, Not Quite White documents the origins and transformations of the multiple meanings projected onto poor rural whites in the United States. Wray draws on a wide variety of primary sources—literary texts, folklore, diaries and journals, medical and scientific articles, social scientific analyses—to construct a dense archive of changing collective representations of poor whites. Of crucial importance are the ideas about poor whites that circulated through early-twentieth-century public health campaigns, such as hookworm eradication and eugenic reforms. In these crusades, impoverished whites, particularly but not exclusively in the American South, were targeted for interventions by sanitarians who viewed them as “filthy, lazy crackers” in need of racial uplift and by eugenicists who viewed them as a “feebleminded menace” to the white race, threats that needed to be confined and involuntarily sterilized. Part historical inquiry and part sociological investigation, Not Quite White demonstrates the power of social categories and boundaries to shape social relationships and institutions, to invent groups where none exist, and to influence policies and legislation that end up harming the very people they aim to help. It illuminates not only the cultural significance and consequences of poor white stereotypes but also how dominant whites exploited and expanded these stereotypes to bolster and defend their own fragile claims to whiteness.
Posted in Social Science

The Sociology of Ethnicity

Author: Sinisa Malesevic

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412932831

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 6606

"This book offers an original synthesis of existing knowledge, pointing forward in a manner that could influence a new generation’s conception of the field and its agenda. If it attracts the attention it merits, it could prove one of the most important books about ethnic and racial relations since the nineteen-eighties." - Michael Banton, Ethnic and Racial Studies "Malesevic provides a thorough and balanced account of the sociological foundations of the study of ethnicity... His presentation is as critical and engaging as it is easy to read and logically organized. It is invaluable reading for sociologists." - Jon Fox, British Journal of Sociology Spanning classical sociology to current debates, The Sociology of Ethnicity synthesizes the leading sociological interpretations of ethnic relations and provides a coherent theoretical framework for its analysis. In this thoughtful and accessible text, Sinisa Malesevic assesses the explanatory strength of a range of sociological theories in understanding ethnicity and ethnic conflict. While acknowledging that there is no master key or blue-print to deal with each and every case of interethnic group relations, The Sociology of Ethnicity develops the best strategy to bridge epistemological and policy requirements for interethnic group relations. The Sociology of Ethnicity will be required reading for advanced undergraduates and postgraduates studying ethnicity and race in sociology and across the social sciences.
Posted in Social Science

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 052543285X

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 6018

Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.
Posted in Social Science

Downwardly Global

Women, Work, and Citizenship in the Pakistani Diaspora

Author: Lalaie Ameeriar

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373408

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 5082

In Downwardly Global Lalaie Ameeriar examines the transnational labor migration of Pakistani women to Toronto. Despite being trained professionals in fields including engineering, law, medicine, and education, they experience high levels of unemployment and poverty. Rather than addressing this downward mobility as the result of bureaucratic failures, in practice their unemployment is treated as a problem of culture and racialized bodily difference. In Toronto, a city that prides itself on multicultural inclusion, women are subjected to two distinct cultural contexts revealing that integration in Canada represents not the erasure of all differences, but the celebration of some differences and the eradication of others. Downwardly Global juxtaposes the experiences of these women in state-funded unemployment workshops, where they are instructed not to smell like Indian food or wear ethnic clothing, with their experiences at cultural festivals in which they are encouraged to promote these same differences. This form of multiculturalism, Ameeriar reveals, privileges whiteness while using race, gender, and cultural difference as a scapegoat for the failures of Canadian neoliberal policies.
Posted in Social Science

Race, Monogamy, and Other Lies They Told You

Busting Myths about Human Nature

Author: Agustín Fuentes

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520285999

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 7333

There are three major myths of human nature: humans are divided into biological races; humans are naturally aggressive; and men and women are truly different in behavior, desires, and wiring. In an engaging and wide-ranging narrative, Agustín Fuentes counters these pervasive and pernicious myths about human behavior. Tackling misconceptions about what race, aggression, and sex really mean for humans, Fuentes incorporates an accessible understanding of culture, genetics, and evolution, requiring us to dispose of notions of “nature or nurture.” Presenting scientific evidence from diverse fields—including anthropology, biology, and psychology—Fuentes devises a myth-busting toolkit to dismantle persistent fallacies about the validity of biological races, the innateness of aggression and violence, and the nature of monogamy and differences between the sexes. A final chapter plus an appendix provide a set of take-home points on how readers can myth-bust on their own. Accessible, compelling, and original, this book is a rich and nuanced account of how nature, culture, experience, and choice interact to influence human behavior.
Posted in Science

Chocolate Cities

The Black Map of American Life

Author: Marcus Anthony Hunter,Zandria Robinson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520292820

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 7885

When you think of a map of the United States, what do you see? Now think of the Seattle that begot Jimi Hendrix. The Dallas that shaped Erykah Badu. The Holly Springs, Mississippi, that compelled Ida B. Wells to activism against lynching. The Birmingham where Martin Luther King, Jr., penned his most famous missive. Now how do you see the United States? Chocolate Cities offers a new cartography of the United States—a “Black Map” that more accurately reflects the lived experiences and the future of Black life in America. Drawing on cultural sources such as film, music, fiction, and plays, and on traditional resources like Census data, oral histories, ethnographies, and health and wealth data, the book offers a new perspective for analyzing, mapping, and understanding the ebbs and flows of the Black American experience—all in the cities, towns, neighborhoods, and communities that Black Americans have created and defended. Black maps are consequentially different from our current geographical understanding of race and place in America. And as the United States moves toward a majority minority society, Chocolate Cities provides a broad and necessary assessment of how racial and ethnic minorities make and change America’s social, economic, and political landscape.
Posted in Social Science

Racial Formation in the United States

Author: Michael Omi,Howard Winant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135127514

Category: Social Science

Page: 330

View: 6251

Twenty years since the publication of the Second Edition and more than thirty years since the publication of the original book, Racial Formation in the United States now arrives with each chapter radically revised and rewritten by authors Michael Omi and Howard Winant, but the overall purpose and vision of this classic remains the same: Omi and Winant provide an account of how concepts of race are created and transformed, how they become the focus of political conflict, and how they come to shape and permeate both identities and institutions. The steady journey of the U.S. toward a majority nonwhite population, the ongoing evisceration of the political legacy of the early post-World War II civil rights movement, the initiation of the ‘war on terror’ with its attendant Islamophobia, the rise of a mass immigrants rights movement, the formulation of race/class/gender ‘intersectionality’ theories, and the election and reelection of a black President of the United States are some of the many new racial conditions Racial Formation now covers.
Posted in Social Science

Intelligence Testing and Minority Students

Foundations, Performance Factors, and Assessment Issues

Author: Richard R. Valencia,Lisa A. Suzuki

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 145225088X

Category: Psychology

Page: 416

View: 3739

Intelligence Testing and Minority Students offers the reader a fresh opportunity to re-learn and re-consider the implications of intelligence testing. Richard R. Valencia and Lisa A. Suzuki discuss the strengths and limitations of IQ testing relative to the factors which may contribute to biased results. They review the history of the adaptation and adoption of intelligence testing; evaluate the heredity-environment debate; discuss the specific performance factors which apply to IQ testing of those in minority ethnic groups. This practical book offers the practitioner a good sense of what can be done to make testing and education serve the needs of all students fairly and validly, whatever their background.
Posted in Psychology

Identity as Ideology

Understanding Ethnicity and Nationalism

Author: S. Malesevic

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230625649

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 7517

Despite profound disagreement on whether identities are essential or existential, primordial or constructed, singular or multiple, there is little dispute over whether identities exist or not. In this provocative study, Sinisa Malesevic interrogates the unproblematic use of concepts of identity, and in particular national or ethnic identity.
Posted in Social Science

Investing in Cultural Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue

Author: Unesco

Publisher: UNESCO

ISBN: 9231040774

Category: Political Science

Page: 402

View: 1075

This report analyses all aspects of cultural diversity, which has emerged as a key concern of the international community in recent decades, and maps out new approaches to monitoring and shaping the changes that are taking place. It highlights, in particular, the interrelated challenges of cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue and the way in which strong homogenizing forces are matched by persistent diversifying trends. The report proposes a series of ten policy-oriented recommendations, to the attention of States, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, international and regional bodies, national institutions and the private sector on how to invest in cultural diversity. Emphasizing the importance of cultural diversity in different areas (languages, education, communication and new media development, and creativity and the marketplace) based on data and examples collected from around the world, the report is also intended for the general public. It proposes a coherent vision of cultural diversity and clarifies how, far from being a threat, it can become beneficial to the action of the international community.
Posted in Political Science

Invisible No More

Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color

Author: Andrea J. Ritchie

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807088986

Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE

Page: 324

View: 6131

A timely examination of the ways Black women, Indigenous women, and other women of color are uniquely affected by racial profiling, police brutality, and immigration enforcement. Invisible No More is a timely examination of how Black women, Indigenous women, and women of color experience racial profiling, police brutality, and immigration enforcement. Placing stories of individual women--such as Sandra Bland, Rekia Boyd, Dajerria Becton, Monica Jones, and Mya Hall--in the broader context of the twin epidemics of police violence and mass incarceration, it documents the evolution of movements centering women's experiences of policing and demands a radical rethinking of our visions of safety--and the means we devote to achieving it.
Posted in POLITICAL SCIENCE

Teaching Race and Anti-Racism in Contemporary America

Adding Context to Colorblindness

Author: Kristin Haltinner

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400771010

Category: Social Science

Page: 453

View: 1368

This book presents thoughtful reflections and in-depth, critical analyses of the new challenges and opportunities instructors face in teaching race during what has been called the “post-racial era”. It examines the racial dimensions of the current political, economic, and cultural climate. The book features renowned scholars and experienced teachers from a range of disciplines and offers successful strategies for teaching important concepts through case studies and active learning exercises. It provides innovative strategies, novel lesson plans and classroom activities for college and university professors who seek effective methods and materials for teaching about race and racism to today’s students. A valuable handbook for educators, this book should be required reading for all graduate students and college instructors.
Posted in Social Science

Race Rebels

Culture, Politics, And The Black Working Class

Author: Robin Kelley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439105049

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 7744

Many black strategies of daily resistance have been obscured--until now. Race rebels, argues Kelley, have created strategies of resistance, movements, and entire subcultures. Here, for the first time, everyday race rebels are given the historiographical attention they deserve, from the Jim Crow era to the present.
Posted in Fiction