Religion Versus Empire?

British Protestant Missionaries and Overseas Expansion, 1700-1914

Author: Andrew Porter

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719028236

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 4443

This is the only book that addresses the relations between religion, Protestant missions, and empire building, linking together all three fields of study by taking as its starting point the early eighteenth century Anglican initiatives in colonial North America and the Caribbean. It considers how the early societies of the 1790s built on this inheritance, and extended their own interests to the Pacific, India, the Far East, and Africa. Fluctuations in the vigor and commitment of the missions, changing missionary theologies, and the emergence of alternative missionary strategies, are all examined for their impact on imperial expansion. Other themes include the international character of the missionary movement, Christianity's encounter with Islam, and major figures such as David Livingstone, the state and politics, and humanitarianism, all of which are viewed in a fresh light.
Posted in History

Religion and International Relations Theory

Author: Jack Snyder

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231526911

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 2653

Religious concerns stand at the center of international politics, yet key paradigms in international relations, namely realism, liberalism, and constructivism, barely consider religion in their analysis of political subjects. The essays in this collection rectify this. Authored by leading scholars, they introduce models that integrate religion into the study of international politics and connect religion to a rising form of populist politics in the developing world. Contributors identify religion as pervasive and distinctive, forcing a reframing of international relations theory that reinterprets traditional paradigms. One essay draws on both realism and constructivism in the examination of religious discourse and transnational networks. Another positions secularism not as the opposite of religion but as a comparable type of worldview drawing on and competing with religious ideas. With the secular state's perceived failure to address popular needs, religion has become a banner for movements that demand a more responsive government. The contributors to this volume recognize this trend and propose structural and theoretical innovations for future advances in the discipline.
Posted in Political Science

God's Empire

Religion and Colonialism in the British World, c.1801–1908

Author: Hilary M. Carey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139494090

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9890

In God's Empire, Hilary M. Carey charts Britain's nineteenth-century transformation from Protestant nation to free Christian empire through the history of the colonial missionary movement. This wide-ranging reassessment of the religious character of the second British empire provides a clear account of the promotional strategies of the major churches and church parties which worked to plant settler Christianity in British domains. Based on extensive use of original archival and rare published sources, the author explores major debates such as the relationship between religion and colonization, church-state relations, Irish Catholics in the empire, the impact of the Scottish Disruption on colonial Presbyterianism, competition between Evangelicals and other Anglicans in the colonies, and between British and American strands of Methodism in British North America.
Posted in History

Empire of Humanity

A History of Humanitarianism

Author: Michael Barnett

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801461095

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 5888

Empire of Humanity explores humanitarianism's remarkable growth from its humble origins in the early nineteenth century to its current prominence in global life. In contrast to most contemporary accounts of humanitarianism that concentrate on the last two decades, Michael Barnett ties the past to the present, connecting the antislavery and missionary movements of the nineteenth century to today's peacebuilding missions, the Cold War interventions in places like Biafra and Cambodia to post-Cold War humanitarian operations in regions such as the Great Lakes of Africa and the Balkans; and the creation of the International Committee of the Red Cross in 1863 to the emergence of the major international humanitarian organizations of the twentieth century. Based on extensive archival work, close encounters with many of today's leading international agencies, and interviews with dozens of aid workers in the field and at headquarters, Empire of Humanity provides a history that is both global and intimate. Avoiding both romanticism and cynicism, Empire of Humanity explores humanitarianism's enduring themes, trends, and, most strikingly, ethical ambiguities. Humanitarianism hopes to change the world, but the world has left its mark on humanitarianism. Humanitarianism has undergone three distinct global ages-imperial, postcolonial, and liberal-each of which has shaped what humanitarianism can do and what it is. The world has produced not one humanitarianism, but instead varieties of humanitarianism. Furthermore, Barnett observes that the world of humanitarianism is divided between an emergency camp that wants to save lives and nothing else and an alchemist camp that wants to remove the causes of suffering. These camps offer different visions of what are the purpose and principles of humanitarianism, and, accordingly respond differently to the same global challenges and humanitarianism emergencies. Humanitarianism has developed a metropolis of global institutions of care, amounting to a global governance of humanity. This humanitarian governance, Barnett observes, is an empire of humanity: it exercises power over the very individuals it hopes to emancipate. Although many use humanitarianism as a symbol of moral progress, Barnett provocatively argues that humanitarianism has undergone its most impressive gains after moments of radical inhumanity, when the "international community" believes that it must atone for its sins and reduce the breach between what we do and who we think we are. Humanitarianism is not only about the needs of its beneficiaries; it also is about the needs of the compassionate.
Posted in Political Science

Empire, Education, and Indigenous Childhoods

Nineteenth-Century Missionary Infant Schools in Three British Colonies

Author: Dr Helen May,Dr Baljit Kaur,Dr Larry Prochner

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472409604

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 1062

Examining the experiences of very young ‘native’ children in three British colonies, the authors focus on the shared as well as unique aspects of the colonial experience in infant schools across the northern part of the North Island of New Zealand, Upper Canada, and British-controlled India. Informed by archival research, Empire, Education, and Indigenous Childhoods illuminates both the pervasiveness of missionary education and the diverse contexts in which its attendant ideals were applied.
Posted in History

Understanding the British Empire

Author: Ronald Hyam

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521115221

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 1327

Study of key themes in the history of the British Empire by one of the senior figures in the field.
Posted in History

Islam and the European Empires

Author: David Motadel

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191030260

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5481

At the height of the imperial age, European powers ruled over most parts of the Islamic world. The British, French, Russian, and Dutch empires each governed more Muslims than any independent Muslim state. European officials believed Islam to be of great political significance, and were quite cautious when it came to matters of the religious life of their Muslim subjects. In the colonies, they regularly employed Islamic religious leaders and institutions to bolster imperial rule. At the same time, the European presence in Muslim lands was confronted by religious resistance movements and Islamic insurgency. Across the globe, from the West African savanna to the shores of Southeast Asia, Muslim rebels called for holy war against non-Muslim intruders. Islam and the European Empires presents the first comparative account of the engagement of all major European empires with Islam. Bringing together fifteen of the world's leading scholars in the field, the volume explores a wide array of themes, ranging from the accommodation of Islam under imperial rule to Islamic anti-colonial resistance. A truly global history of empire, the volume makes a major contribution not only to our knowledge of the intersection of Islam and imperialism, but also more generally to our understanding of religion and power in the modern world.
Posted in History

Missions and Empire

Author: Norman Etherington

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191531064

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1425

The explosive expansion of Christianity in Africa and Asia during the last two centuries constitutes one of the most remarkable cultural transformations in the history of mankind. Because it coincided with the spread of European economic and political hegemony, it tends to be taken for granted that Christian missions went hand in hand with imperialism and colonial conquest. In this book historians survey the relationship between Christian missions and the British Empire from the seventeenth century to the 1960s and treat the subject thematically, rather than regionally or chronologically. Many of these themes are treated at length for the first time, relating the work of missions to language, medicine, anthropology, and decolonization. Other important chapters focus on the difficult relationship between missionaries and white settlers, women and mission, and the neglected role of the indigenous evangelists who did far more than European or North American missionaries to spread the Christian religion - belying the image of Christianity as the 'white man's religion'.
Posted in History

Empires of the Sea

The Siege of Malta, the Battle of Lepanto, and the Contest for the Center of the Center of the World

Author: Roger Crowley

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812977645

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 9643

A thrilling account of the brutal decades-long battle between Christendom and Islam for the soul of Europe. This struggle's brutal climax came between 1565 and 1571, seven years that witnessed a fight to the finish decided in a series of bloody set pieces: the epic siege of Malta, in which a tiny band of Christian defenders defied the might of the Ottoman army; the savage battle for Cyprus; and the apocalyptic last-ditch defense of southern Europe at Lepanto--one of the single most shocking days in world history. At the close of this cataclysmic naval encounter, the carnage was so great that the victors could barely sail away because of the countless corpses floating in the sea. Lepanto fixed the frontiers of the Mediterranean world that we know today.
Posted in History

Religious Internationals in the Modern World

Globalization and Faith Communities since 1750

Author: A. Green,V. Viaene

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137031719

Category: Religion

Page: 383

View: 9463

Tracing the emergence of 'Religious Internationals' as a distinctive new phenomenon in world history, this book transforms our understanding of the role of religion in our modern world. Through in-depth studies comparing the experiences of Buddhists, Christians, Hindus, Jews and Muslims, leading experts shed new light on 'global civil society'.
Posted in Religion

Evangelists of Empire?

Missionaries in Colonial History

Author: Amanda Barry,Joanna Cruickshank,Andrew Brown-May

Publisher: UoM Custom Book Centre

ISBN: 0980759404

Category: Imperialism

Page: 262

View: 9997

Utilising a range of source material and a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, this ground-breaking collection offers the reader new ways of assessing the uneven paths of mission endeavours, and examines the ways in which Indigenous peoples responded to -- and took ownership of -- aspects of Christian and Western culture and spirituality.
Posted in Imperialism

The Debate on the Rise of British Imperialism

Author: Anthony Webster

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719067938

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 2665

Anthony Webster examines the rise of the British empire and the various debates among historians of imperialism over two hundred years. He discusses why the empire is an attractive subject, why controversy surrounds it, and how different generations of historians have read the episodes in the history of the empire.
Posted in History

Irish Imperial Networks

Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century India

Author: Barry Crosbie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 113950181X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7183

This is an innovative study of the role of Ireland and the Irish in the British Empire which examines the intellectual, cultural and political interconnections between nineteenth-century British imperial, Irish and Indian history. Barry Crosbie argues that Ireland was a crucial sub-imperial centre for the British Empire in South Asia that provided a significant amount of the manpower, intellectual and financial capital that fuelled Britain's drive into Asia from the 1750s onwards. He shows the important role that Ireland played as a centre for recruitment for the armed forces, the medical and civil services and the many missionary and scientific bodies established in South Asia during the colonial period. In doing so, the book also reveals the important part that the Empire played in shaping Ireland's domestic institutions, family life and identity in equally significant ways.
Posted in History

Evaluating Empire and Confronting Colonialism in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Author: Jack P. Greene

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107030552

Category: History

Page: 385

View: 6203

This book analyzes how Britons celebrated and critiqued their empire during the short eighteenth century, from about 1730 to 1790. It focuses on the emergence of an early awareness of the undesirable effects of British colonialism on both overseas Britons and subaltern people in the British Empire, whether in India, the Americas, Africa, or Ireland.
Posted in History

Entanglements of Empire

Missionaries, Maori, and the Question of the Body

Author: Tony Ballantyne

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN: 1775587975

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 8450

Entanglements of Empire explores the political, cultural and economic entanglements and irrevocable social transformations that resulted from Maori engagements with Protestant missionaries at the most distant edge of the British empire. The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Maori. Entanglements of Empire is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period. Misunderstanding was rife: the physical body itself became the most contentious site of cultural engagement, as Maori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality. In this fascinating study, Tony Ballantyne explores the varying understandings of such concepts as civilization, work, time and space, and gender – and the practical consequences of the struggles over these ideas. The encounters in the classroom, chapel, kitchen, and farmyard worked mutually to affect both the Maori and the English worldviews. Ultimately, the interest in missionary Christianity among influential Maori chiefs had far-reaching consequences for both groups. Concluding in 1840 with the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi and the new age it ushered in, Ballantyne’s book offers important insights into this crucial period of New Zealand history.
Posted in History

Conflict, Conquest, and Conversion

Two Thousand Years of Christian Missions in the Middle East

Author: Eleanor H. Tejirian,Reeva Spector Simon

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511094

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8673

Conflict, Conquest, and Conversion surveys two thousand years of the Christian missionary enterprise in the Middle East within the context of the region's political evolution. Its broad, rich narrative follows Christian missions as they interacted with imperial powers and as the momentum of religious change shifted from Christianity to Islam and back, adding new dimensions to the history of the region and the nature of the relationship between the Middle East and the West. Historians and political scientists increasingly recognize the importance of integrating religion into political analysis, and this volume, using long-neglected sources, uniquely advances this effort. It surveys Christian missions from the earliest days of Christianity to the present, paying particular attention to the role of Christian missions, both Protestant and Catholic, in shaping the political and economic imperialism of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Eleanor H. Tejirian and Reeva Spector Simon delineate the ongoing tensions between conversion and the focus on witness and "good works" within the missionary movement, which contributed to the development and spread of nongovernmental organizations. Through its conscientious, systematic study, this volume offers an unparalleled encounter with the social, political, and economic consequences of such trends.
Posted in History

Assimilation and Empire

Uniformity in French and British Colonies, 1541-1954

Author: Saliha Belmessous

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191651028

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 8126

Assimilation was an ideology central to European expansion and colonisation, an ideology which legitimised colonisation for centuries. Assimilation and Empire shows that the aspiration for assimilation was not only driven by materialistic reasons, but was also motivated by ideas. The engine of assimilation was found in the combination of two powerful ideas: the European philosophical conception of human perfectibility and the idea of the modern state. Europeans wanted to create, in their empires, political and cultural forms they valued and wanted to realise in their own societies, but which did not yet exist. Saliha Belmessous examines three imperial experiments - seventeenth- and eighteenth-century New France, nineteenth-century British Australia, and nineteenth and twentieth-century French Algeria - and reveals the complex inter-relationship between policies of assimilation, which were driven by a desire for perfection and universality, and the greatest challenge to those policies, discourses of race, which were based upon perceptions of difference. Neither colonised nor European peoples themselves were able to conform to the ideals given as the object of assimilation. Yet, the deep links between assimilation and empire remained because at no point since the sixteenth century has the utopian project of perfection - articulated through the progressive theory of history - been placed seriously in question. The failure of assimilation pursued through empire, for both colonised and coloniser, reveals the futility of the historical pursuit of perfection.
Posted in History

Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions

Author: Gerald H. Anderson

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802846808

Category: Religion

Page: 845

View: 3119

"The book also features cross-references throughout, a bibliography accompanying each entry, an elaborate appendix listing biographies according to particular categories of interest, and a comprehensive index."--Book jacket.
Posted in Religion

Abolition and Empire in Sierra Leone and Liberia

Author: B. Everill

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137291818

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 4893

Bronwen Everill offers a new perspective on African global history, applying a comparative approach to freed slave settlers in Sierra Leone and Liberia to understand their role in the anti-slavery colonization movements of Britain and America.
Posted in History

Tibet in the Western Imagination

Author: T. Neuhaus

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137264837

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 5158

Neuhaus explores the roots of the long-standing European fascination with Tibet, from the Dalai Lama to the Abominable Snowman. Surveying a wide range of travel accounts, official documents, correspondence and fiction, he examines how different people thought about both Tibet and their home cultures.
Posted in History