Religion, Magic, and the Origins of Science in Early Modern England

Author: John Henry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351219286

Category: Science

Page: 328

View: 2296

In these articles John Henry argues on the one hand for the intimate relationship between religion and early modern attempts to develop new understandings of nature, and on the other hand for the role of occult concepts in early modern natural philosophy. Focussing on the scene in England, the articles provide detailed examinations of the religious motivations behind Roman Catholic efforts to develop a new mechanical philosophy, theories of the soul and immaterial spirits, and theories of active matter. There are also important studies of animism in the beginnings of experimentalism, the role of occult qualities in the mechanical philosophy, and a new account of the decline of magic. As well as general surveys, the collection includes in depth studies of William Gilbert, Sir Kenelm Digby, Henry More, Francis Glisson, Robert Boyle, Robert Hooke, and Isaac Newton.
Posted in Science

Religion, Magic, and Science in Early Modern Europe and America

Author: Allison Coudert

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0275996735

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 287

View: 7996

This fascinating study looks at how the seemingly incompatible forces of science, magic, and religion came together in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries to form the foundations of modern culture.
Posted in Body, Mind & Spirit

Religion and the Decline of Magic

Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century England

Author: Keith Thomas

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141932406

Category: History

Page: 880

View: 9001

Witchcraft, astrology, divination and every kind of popular magic flourished in England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, from the belief that a blessed amulet could prevent the assaults of the Devil to the use of the same charms to recover stolen goods. At the same time the Protestant Reformation attempted to take the magic out of religion, and scientists were developing new explanations of the universe. Keith Thomas's classic analysis of beliefs held on every level of English society begins with the collapse of the medieval Church and ends with the changing intellectual atmosphere around 1700, when science and rationalism began to challenge the older systems of belief.
Posted in History

Alchemical Belief

Occultism in the Religious Culture of Early Modern England

Author: Bruce Janacek

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271050136

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 222

View: 8386

"Explores the practice of alchemy in the context of the religious and political tensions in late Elizabethan and early Stuart England, and the use of occult knowledge to demonstrate proof of theological doctrines"--Provided by publisher.
Posted in Body, Mind & Spirit

Medicine, Religion, and Magic in Early Stuart England

Richard Napier's Medical Practice

Author: Ofer Hadass

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271081732

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 1987

The astrologer-physician Richard Napier (1559-1634) was not only a man of practical science and medicine but also a master of occult arts and a devout parish rector who purportedly held conversations with angels. This new interpretation of Napier reveals him to be a coherent and methodical man whose burning desire for certain, true knowledge contributed to the contemporary venture of putting existing knowledge to useful ends. Originally trained in theology and ordained as an Anglican priest, Napier later studied astrological medicine and combined astrology, religious thought, and image and ritual magic in his medical work. Ofer Hadass draws on a remarkable archive of Napier’s medical cases and religious writings—including the interviews he claimed to have held with angels—to show how Napier’s seemingly inconsistent approaches were rooted in an inclusive and coherent worldview, combining equal respect for ancient authority and for experientially derived knowledge. Napier’s endeavors exemplify the fruitful relationship between religion and science that offered a well-founded alternative to the rising mechanistic explanation of nature at the time. Carefully researched and compellingly told, Medicine, Religion, and Magic in Early Stuart England is an insightful exploration of one of the most fascinating figures at the intersection of medicine, magic, and theology in early modern England and of the healing methods employed by physicians of the era.
Posted in History

The Scientific Revolution and the Origins of Modern Science

Author: John Henry

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137191619

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 2040

This is a concise but wide-ranging account of all aspects of the Scientific Revolution from astronomy to zoology. The third edition has been thoroughly updated, and some sections revised and extended, to take into account the latest scholarship and research and new developments in historiography.
Posted in History

Wonder Shows

Performing Science, Magic, and Religion in America

Author: Fred Nadis

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813541212

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 336

View: 3006

In Wonder Shows, Fred Nadis offers a colorful history of these traveling magicians, inventors, popular science lecturers, and other presenters of “miracle science” who revealed science and technology to the public in awe-inspiring fashion. The book provides an innovative synthesis of the history of performance with a wider study of culture, science, and religion from the antebellum period to the present.
Posted in Games & Activities

Magic and Magicians in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Time

The Occult in Pre-Modern Sciences, Medicine, Literature, Religion, and Astrology

Author: Albrecht Classen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 311055772X

Category: History

Page: 767

View: 4543

There are no clear demarcation lines between magic, astrology, necromancy, medicine, and even sciences in the pre-modern world. Under the umbrella term 'magic,' the contributors to this volume examine a wide range of texts, both literary and religious, both medical and philosophical, in which the topic is discussed from many different perspectives. The fundamental concerns address issue such as how people perceived magic, whether they accepted it and utilized it for their own purposes, and what impact magic might have had on the mental structures of that time. While some papers examine the specific appearance of magicians in literary texts, others analyze the practical application of magic in medical contexts. In addition, this volume includes studies that deal with the rise of the witch craze in the late fifteenth century and then also investigate whether the Weberian notion of disenchantment pertaining to the modern world can be maintained. Magic is, oddly but significantly, still around us and exerts its influence. Focusing on magic in the medieval world thus helps us to shed light on human culture at large.
Posted in History

Superstition and Magic in Early Modern Europe: A Reader

Author: N.A

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1441100326

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3843

Superstition and Magic in Early Modern Europe brings together a rich selection of essays which represent the most important historical research on religion, magic and superstition in early modern Europe. Each essay makes a significant contribution to the history of magic and religion in its own right, while together they demonstrate how debates over the topic have evolved over time, providing invaluable intellectual, historical, and socio-political context for readers approaching the subject for the first time. The essays are organised around five key themes and areas of controversy. Part One tackles superstition; Part Two, the tension between miracles and magic; Part Three, ghosts and apparitions; Part Four, witchcraft and witch trials; and Part Five, the gradual disintegration of the 'magical universe' in the face of scientific, religious and practical opposition. Each part is prefaced by an introduction that provides an outline of the historiography and engages with recent scholarship and debate, setting the context for the essays that follow and providing a foundation for further study. This collection is an invaluable toolkit for students of early modern Europe, providing both a focused overview and a springboard for broader thinking about the underlying continuities and discontinuities that make the study of magic and superstition a perennially fascinating topic.
Posted in History

Magic in the Middle Ages

Author: Richard Kieckhefer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107431824

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 8678

A fascinating study of natural and demonic magic within the broad context of medieval culture.
Posted in History

The Realities of Witchcraft and Popular Magic in Early Modern Europe

Culture, Cognition and Everyday Life

Author: E. Bever

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230582117

Category: History

Page: 627

View: 5838

Exploring the elements of reality in early modern witchcraft and popular magic, through a combination of detailed archival research and broad-ranging interdisciplinary analyses, this book complements and challenges existing scholarship, and offers unique insights into this murky aspect of early modern history.
Posted in History

Magic as a Political Crime in Medieval and Early Modern England

A History of Sorcery and Treason

Author: Francis Young

Publisher: International Library of Histo

ISBN: 9781788310215

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 8615

Treason and magic were first linked together during the reign of Edward II. Theories of occult conspiracy then regularly led to major political scandals, such as the trial of Eleanor Cobham Duchess of Gloucester in 1441. While accusations of magical treason against high-ranking figures were indeed a staple of late medieval English power politics, they acquired new significance at the Reformation when the "superstition" embodied by magic came to be associated with proscribed Catholic belief. Francis Young here offers the first concerted historical analysis of allegations of the use of magic either to harm or kill the monarch, or else manipulate the course of political events in England, between the 14th century and the dawn of the Enlightenment. His book addresses a subject usually either passed over or elided with witchcraft: a quite different historical phenomenon. He argues that while charges of treasonable magic certainly were used to destroy reputations or to ensure the convictions of undesirables, magic was also perceived as a genuine threat by English governments into the Civil War era and beyond.
Posted in History

Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution

Author: Holly Tucker

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393080420

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 7355

“Excellent. . . . Tucker’s chronicle of the world of 17th-century science in London and Paris is fascinating.”—The Economist In December 1667, maverick physician Jean Denis transfused calf’s blood into one of Paris’s most notorious madmen. Days later, the madman was dead and Denis was framed for murder. A riveting exposé of the fierce debates, deadly politics, and cutthroat rivalries behind the first transfusion experiments, Blood Work takes us from dissection rooms in palaces to the streets of Paris, providing an unforgettable portrait of an era that wrestled with the same questions about morality and experimentation that haunt medical science today.
Posted in Science

Religion and the Senses in Early Modern Europe

Author: Wietse de Boer,Christine Göttler

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004236341

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 1022

This interdisciplinary volume examines the role of sensation in the religious transformations of early modern Europe. Sensation was both central to the doctrinal disputes of the Reformation and critical in shaping new or reformed devotional practices.
Posted in History

A History of Science, Magic and Belief

From Medieval to Early Modern Europe

Author: Steven P. Marrone

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781137029799

Category:

Page: 317

View: 1977

Posted in

Religion and Magic in Ancient Egypt

Author: Rosalie David

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141941383

Category: Religion

Page: 512

View: 3439

The ancient Egyptians believed that the Nile - their life source - was a divine gift. Religion and magic permeated their civilization, and this book provides a unique insight into their religious beliefs and practices, from 5000 BC to the 4th century AD, when Egyptian Christianity replaced the earlier customs. Arranged chronologically, this book provides a fascinating introduction to the world of half-human/ half-animal gods and goddesses; death rituals, the afterlife and mummification; the cult of sacred animals, pyramids, magic and medicine. An appendix contains translations of Ancient Eygtian spells.
Posted in Religion

The Book of Magic

From Antiquity to the Enlightenment

Author: Brian Copenhaver

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141393157

Category: Philosophy

Page: 704

View: 9658

'. . . as when iron is drawn to a magnet, camphor is sucked into hot air, crystal lights up in the Sun, sulfur and a volatile liquid are kindled by flame, an empty eggshell filled with dew is raised towards the Sun . . .' An odd feature of the Bible is that it is full of stories featuring forms of magic and possession - from Joseph battling with Pharaoh's wizards to the supernatural actions of Jesus and his disciples. As, over the following centuries, the Christian church attempted to stamp out 'deviant' practices, there was a persistent interest in magic that drew strength from this Biblical validation. A strange blend of mumbo-jumbo, fraud and deeply serious study, magic was central to the European Renaissance, fascinating many of its greatest figures. Brian Copenhaver's wonderful anthology will be welcomed by everyone from those with the most casual interest in the magical tradition to anyone drawn to the Renaissance and the tangled, arcane roots of the scientific tradition.
Posted in Philosophy

Magic in the Cloister

Pious Motives, Illicit Interests, and Occult Approaches to the Medieval Universe

Author: Sophie Page

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271062975

Category: Religion

Page: 248

View: 1025

During the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries a group of monks with occult interests donated what became a remarkable collection of more than thirty magic texts to the library of the Benedictine abbey of St. Augustine’s in Canterbury. The monks collected texts that provided positive justifications for the practice of magic and books in which works of magic were copied side by side with works of more licit genres. In Magic in the Cloister, Sophie Page uses this collection to explore the gradual shift toward more positive attitudes to magical texts and ideas in medieval Europe. She examines what attracted monks to magic texts, in spite of the dangers involved in studying condemned works, and how the monks combined magic with their intellectual interests and monastic life. By showing how it was possible for religious insiders to integrate magical studies with their orthodox worldview, Magic in the Cloister contributes to a broader understanding of the role of magical texts and ideas and their acceptance in the late Middle Ages.
Posted in Religion

The Invention of Religion in Japan

Author: Jason Ananda Josephson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226412350

Category: Religion

Page: 404

View: 6455

Throughout its long history, Japan had no concept of what we call “religion.” There was no corresponding Japanese word, nor anything close to its meaning. But when American warships appeared off the coast of Japan in 1853 and forced the Japanese government to sign treaties demanding, among other things, freedom of religion, the country had to contend with this Western idea. In this book, Jason Ananda Josephson reveals how Japanese officials invented religion in Japan and traces the sweeping intellectual, legal, and cultural changes that followed. More than a tale of oppression or hegemony, Josephson’s account demonstrates that the process of articulating religion offered the Japanese state a valuable opportunity. In addition to carving out space for belief in Christianity and certain forms of Buddhism, Japanese officials excluded Shinto from the category. Instead, they enshrined it as a national ideology while relegating the popular practices of indigenous shamans and female mediums to the category of “superstitions”—and thus beyond the sphere of tolerance. Josephson argues that the invention of religion in Japan was a politically charged, boundary-drawing exercise that not only extensively reclassified the inherited materials of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Shinto to lasting effect, but also reshaped, in subtle but significant ways, our own formulation of the concept of religion today. This ambitious and wide-ranging book contributes an important perspective to broader debates on the nature of religion, the secular, science, and superstition.
Posted in Religion

Studies in the History of Culture and Science

A Tribute to Gad Freudenthal

Author: Resianne Fontaine

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004191232

Category: Social Science

Page: 489

View: 1613

An hommage to Gad Freudenthal, this volume offers studies on the history of science and on the role of science in medieval and early-modern Jewish cultures, investigating various aspects of processes of knowledge transfer and scientific cross-cultural contacts,
Posted in Social Science