Racism on Trial

The Chicano Fight for Justice

Author: Ian F. Haney López

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674038264

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4718

In 1968, ten thousand students marched in protest over the terrible conditions prevalent in the high schools of East Los Angeles, the largest Mexican community in the United States. Chanting "Chicano Power," the young insurgents not only demanded change but heralded a new racial politics. Frustrated with the previous generation's efforts to win equal treatment by portraying themselves as racially white, the Chicano protesters demanded justice as proud members of a brown race. The legacy of this fundamental shift continues to this day. Ian Haney Lopez tells the compelling story of the Chicano movement in Los Angeles by following two criminal trials, including one arising from the student walkouts. He demonstrates how racial prejudice led to police brutality and judicial discrimination that in turn spurred Chicano militancy. He also shows that legal violence helped to convince Chicano activists that they were nonwhite, thereby encouraging their use of racial ideas to redefine their aspirations, culture, and selves. In a groundbreaking advance that further connects legal racism and racial politics, Haney Lopez describes how race functions as "common sense," a set of ideas that we take for granted in our daily lives. This racial common sense, Haney Lopez argues, largely explains why racism and racial affiliation persist today. By tracing the fluid position of Mexican Americans on the divide between white and nonwhite, describing the role of legal violence in producing racial identities, and detailing the commonsense nature of race, Haney Lopez offers a much needed, potentially liberating way to rethink race in the United States.
Posted in History

Racism on Trial

The Chicano Fight for Justice

Author: Ian Haney-López

Publisher: Belknap Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 324

View: 1179

The author, a professor of law at the University of California, recalls the 1968 "Chicano Power" demonstrations that changed the face of the Mexican-American community in California. (History)
Posted in Law

Racism on Trial

The Chicano Fight for Justice

Author: Ian Haney-López

Publisher: Belknap Press

ISBN: 9780674016293

Category: Law

Page: 324

View: 8019

Haney Lopez tells the compelling story of the Chicano movement in Los Angeles by following two criminal trials, including one arising from the student walkouts of 1968. He demonstrates how racial prejudice led to police brutality and judicial discrimination that in turn spurred Chicano militancy. By tracing the fluid position of Mexican Americans on the divide between white and nonwhite, describing the role of legal violence in producing racial identities, and detailing the commonsense nature of race, he offers a much needed way to rethink race in the United States.
Posted in Law

After the War on Crime

Race, Democracy, and a New Reconstruction

Author: Mary Louise Frampton,Ian Haney Lopez,Jonathan Simon

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814727829

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 8983

Since the 1970s, Americans have witnessed a pyrrhic war on crime, with sobering numbers at once chilling and cautionary. Our imprisoned population has increased five-fold, with a commensurate spike in fiscal costs that many now see as unsupportable into the future. As American society confronts a multitude of new challenges ranging from terrorism to the disappearance of middle-class jobs to global warming, the war on crime may be up for reconsideration for the first time in a generation or more. Relatively low crime rates indicate that the public mood may be swinging toward declaring victory and moving on. However, to declare that the war is over is dangerous and inaccurate, and After the War on Crime reveals that the impact of this war reaches far beyond statistics; simply moving on is impossible. The war has been most devastating to those affected by increased rates and longer terms of incarceration, but its reach has also reshaped a sweeping range of social institutions, including law enforcement, politics, schooling, healthcare, and social welfare. The war has also profoundly altered conceptions of race and community. It is time to consider the tasks reconstruction must tackle. To do so requires first a critical assessment of how this war has remade our society, and then creative thinking about how government, foundations, communities, and activists should respond. After the War on Crime accelerates this reassessment with original essays by a diverse, interdisciplinary group of scholars as well as policy professionals and community activists. The volume's immediate goal is to spark a fresh conversation about the war on crime and its consequences; its long-term aspiration is to develop a clear understanding of how we got here and of where we should go.
Posted in Law

Racism on Trial

From the Medgar Evers Murder Case to Ghosts of Mississippi

Author: Wim Coleman,Pat Perrin

Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 9780766030596

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 3398

"Examines the Byron De La Beckwith murder trials, including the mistrials and his eventual conviction, key figures in the case, and the inspiration for the movie Ghosts of Mississippi"--Provided by publisher.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

White Fragility

Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism

Author: Robin DiAngelo

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807047414

Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS

Page: 192

View: 909

Explores counterproductive reactions white people have when discussing racism that serve to protect their positions and maintain racial inequality.
Posted in FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS

Dog Whistle Politics

How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class

Author: Ian Haney-López

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019022925X

Category: Political Science

Page: 277

View: 5413

Describes how conservatives in government are using race-baiting to coax the middle class with promises of curbing crime, stopping undocumented immigration and even halting Islamic infiltration into voting for right-wing policies that ultimately hurt them and favor the rich.
Posted in Political Science

White by Law

The Legal Construction of Race

Author: Ian Haney Lopez

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814736947

Category: Law

Page: 263

View: 8877

"Whiteness pays. As White by Law shows, immigrants recognized the value of whiteness and sometimes petitioned the courts to be recognized as white. Haney Lspez argues for the centrality of law in constructing race."--Voice Literary Supplement"White by Law's thoughtful analysis of the prerequisite cases offers support for the fundamental critical race theory tenet that race is a social construct reinforced by law. Haney Lspez has blazed a trail for those exploring the legal and social constructions of race in the United States."--Berkeley Women's Law JournalLily white. White knights. The white dove of peace. White lie, white list, white magic. Our language and our culture are suffused, often subconsciously, with positive images of whiteness. Whiteness is so inextricably linked with the status quo that few whites, when asked, even identify themselves as such. And yet when asked what they would have to be paid to live as a black person, whites give figures running into the millions of dollars per year, suggesting just how valuable whiteness is in American society.Exploring the social, and specifically legal origins, of white racial identity, Ian F. Haney Lopez here examines cases in America's past that have been instrumental in forming contemporary conceptions of race, law, and whiteness. In 1790, Congress limited naturalization to white persons. This racial prerequisite for citizenship remained in force for over a century and a half, enduring until 1952. In a series of important cases, including two heard by the United States Supreme Court, judges around the country decided and defined who was white enough to become American.White by Law traces the reasoning employed by the courts intheir efforts to justify the whiteness of some and the non- whiteness of others. Did light skin make a
Posted in Law

To Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Harper Lee

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 178487079X

Category: African Americans

Page: 496

View: 2342

'Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird' Meet Scout, the narrator of this book. Her story is one of Deep South summers, fights at school and playing in the street. The spooky house of her mysterious neighbour, Boo Radley, sags dark and forbidding nearby. Her brother, Jem, and her friend, Dill, want to make Boo come outside. Her story is about justice. When Scout's father, a lawyer, agrees to defend a black man against an accusation by a white girl, he must battle the prejudice of the whole town. It's about imagination - not just the kind you need for childhood games. Because you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Vintage Children's Classics is a twenty-first century classics list aimed at 8-12 year olds and the adults in their lives. Discover timeless favourites from The Jungle Book and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland to modern classics such as The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.
Posted in African Americans

Universal Citizenship

Latina/o Studies at the Limits of Identity

Author: R. Andrés Guzmán

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 1477317635

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 4702

Recently, many critics have questioned the idea of universal citizenship by pointing to the racial, class, and gendered exclusions on which the notion of universality rests. Rather than jettison the idea of universal citizenship, however, R. Andrés Guzmán builds on these critiques to reaffirm it especially within the fields of Latina/o and ethnic studies. Beyond conceptualizing citizenship as an outcome of recognition and admittance by the nation-state—in a negotiation for the right to have rights—he asserts that, insofar as universal citizenship entails a forceful entrance into the political from the latter’s foundational exclusions, it emerges at the limits of legality and illegality via a process that exceeds identitarian capture. Drawing on Lacanian psychoanalysis and philosopher Alain Badiou’s notion of “generic politics,” Guzmán advances his argument through close analyses of various literary, cultural, and legal texts that foreground contention over the limits of political belonging. These include the French Revolution, responses to Arizona’s H.B. 2281, the 2006 immigrant rights protests in the United States, the writings of Oscar “Zeta” Acosta, Frantz Fanon’s account of Algeria’s anticolonial struggle, and more. In each case, Guzmán traces the advent of the “citizen” as a collective subject made up of anyone who seeks to radically transform the organizational coordinates of the place in which she or he lives.
Posted in Social Science

History on Trial

Culture Wars and the Teaching of the Past

Author: Gary B. Nash,Charlotte Antoinette Crabtree,Ross E. Dunn

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679767509

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 5313

An incisive overview of the current debate over the teaching of history in American schools examines the setting of controversial standards for history education, the integration of multiculturalism and minorities into the curriculum, and ways to make history more relevant to students. Reprint.
Posted in Education

Beneath a Ruthless Sun

A True Story of Violence, Race, and Justice Lost and Found

Author: Gilbert King

Publisher: Random House Large Print

ISBN: 9780525589341

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 1867

From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning bestseller DEVIL IN THE GROVE, a gripping story of sex, race, class, corruption, and the arc of justice twisted and bent straight again in the Florida citrus groves. In December 1957, which brings a rare killing freeze to Florida's orange groves, Blanche Bosanquet Knowles, the wealthy young wife of a citrus baron, is raped in her home while her husband is away. She says a "husky Negro" did it, and Lake County's infamously racist sheriff, Willis McCall, has no hesitation in rounding up a herd of suspects matching that description. But within days all are released without explanation, and just as inexplicably, McCall turns his sights on Jesse Daniels, a gentle white nineteen-year-old with the mental capacity of a ten-year-old. Jesse's parents insist he was asleep with his teddy bear on the night in question, yet their every attempt to exonerate him fails and he is railroaded up north to the Florida State Hospital for the Insane. Facts are stubborn things, though, especially in the hands of crusading journalist Mabel Norris Reese. While Jesse languishes at Chattahoochee, Mabel frets over the case and its baffling outcome. Who is protecting whom, or what? She recruits to the cause an inexperienced young lawyer named Richard Graham. Together they pursue the case, winning unlikely allies and chasing down leads until at long last they begin to unravel the unspeakable truths behind a racial conspiracy that shocked a community into silence. Yet it is only now, half a century on, that Gilbert King has been able to coax the last long-guarded secrets out of proud, private families and to bring the whole shameful story to light. Powerful, page-turning, and rippling with the tensions that still fracture our own times, Beneath a Ruthless Sun will be devoured by Gilbert King's many fans and win him many, many more.
Posted in History

Protest on Trial

The Seattle 7 Conspiracy

Author: Kit Bakke

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780874223569

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 252

View: 3089

The Seattle 7 embodied late 1960s counterculture--young, idealistic, active organizers against racism and the Vietnam War. In January 1970 they founded the Seattle Liberation Front (SLF). Nationally, the FBI was practicing secret and illegal tactics such as wiretapping, warrantless break-ins, and hiring informants and provocateurs to destroy organizations like the SLF. In Seattle, it went a step further. Months after a February 1970 protest at Seattle's downtown federal building turned violent, authorities arrested seven SLF leaders. The activists faced federal conspiracy and intent to riot indictments. During their chaotic trial in nearby Tacoma, they received a twelve-day crash course in the real American judicial system. When the prosecution's key witness faltered and the government's case appeared doomed, the presiding judge issued a surprise ruling to end the trial and send the defendants to prison. "'Protest on Trial' chronicles a significant, real-life slice of history, but it reads more like a well-crafted novel--a compelling narrative that feels completely contemporary, and reminds us that dissent--now no less than then--is the essence of democracy."--Bill Ayers, author of "Fugitive Days," Public Enemy," and "Demand the Impossible!" "Using impressive interviews as well as the revealing trial transcript, this excellent narrative makes contributions to the history of the Northwest, Seattle, radicalism, and activism."William Rorabaugh, University of Washington Professor of History and author of "American Hippies"
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Opposing Jim Crow

African Americans and the Soviet Indictment of U.S. Racism, 1928-1937

Author: Meredith L. Roman

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803240848

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 9429

Before the Nazis came to power in Germany, Soviet officials labeled the United States the most racist country in the world. Photographs, children’s stories, films, newspaper articles, political education campaigns, and court proceedings exposed the hypocrisy of America’s racial democracy. In contrast, the Soviets represented the USSR itself as a superior society where racism was absent and identified African Americans as valued allies in resisting an imminent imperialist war against the first workers’ state. Meredith L. Roman’s Opposing Jim Crow examines the period between 1928 and 1937, when the promotion of antiracism by party and trade union officials in Moscow became a priority policy. Although Soviet leaders stood to gain considerable propagandistic value at home and abroad by drawing attention to U.S. racism, their actions simultaneously directed attention to the routine violation of human rights that African Americans suffered as citizens of the United States. Soviet policy also challenged the prevailing white supremacist notion that blacks were biologically inferior and thus unworthy of equality with whites. African Americans of various political and socioeconomic backgrounds became indispensable contributors to Soviet antiracism and helped officials in Moscow challenge the United States’ claim to be the world’s beacon of democracy and freedom.
Posted in Social Science

Racism from the Eyes of a Child

Author: Matthew Knowles

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780692046821

Category: African American children

Page: 208

View: 6033

"A personal reflection on racism in America...Knowles examines the backdrop of discrimination by tracing his family's southern roots; post-slavery from the 1800's, up through the civil rights protests, on into the present racial climate. In this, he delivers a closer look at segregationist times-- from school integration to cattle prodded protesters such as himself... how the resistance grew over the years, and created generations of fighters and against-odds achievers"--from backcover.
Posted in African American children

Blackballed

The Black and White Politics of Race on America's Campuses

Author: Lawrence Ross

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN: 9781250131546

Category: Education

Page: 288

View: 1703

"College" is a word that means many things to many people: a space for knowledge, a place to gain lifelong friends, and an opportunity to transcend one's socioeconomic station. Today, though, this word also recalls a slew of headlines that have revealed a dark and persistent world of racial politics on campus. Does this association disturb our idealized visions of what happens behind the ivied walls of higher learning? It should - because campus racism on college campuses is as American as college football on Fall Saturdays. From Lawrence Ross, author of The Divine Nine and the leading expert on sororities and fraternities, Blackballed is an explosive and controversial book that rips the veil off America's hidden secret: America's colleges have fostered a racist environment that makes them a hostile space for African American students. Blackballed exposes the white fraternity and sorority system, with traditions of racist parties, songs, and assaults on black students; and the universities themselves, who name campus buildings after racist men and women. It also takes a deep dive into anti-affirmative action policies, and how they effectively segregate predominately white universities, providing ample room for white privilege. A bold mix of history and the current climate, Blackballed is a call to action for universities to make radical changes to their policies and standards to foster a better legacy for all students.
Posted in Education

The People V. O.J. Simpson

Author: Jeffrey Toobin

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473537770

Category: True Crime

Page: 496

View: 2906

Now a major BBC TV series. The definitive account of the O.J. Simpson trial, The People v. O.J. Simpson is a prodigious feat of reporting that could only have been written by the foremost legal journalist of our time. Writing less than a year after the infamous verdict, Jeffrey Toobin explores the secret dealings and manoeuvring on both sides of the case, and how a combination of the prosecution’s over-confidence, the defence’s shrewdness, and the Los Angeles Police Department’s incendiary history with the city’s African-American community, gave a jury what it needed: reasonable doubt. Rich in character, as propulsive as a legal thriller, this enduring narrative continues to shock and fascinate with its candid depiction of the human drama that upended the world. The People v. O.J. Simpson tells the whole story, from the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman to the ruthless gamesmanship behind the scenes of the trial of the century.
Posted in True Crime

The End of Racism

Finding Values In An Age Of Technoaffluence

Author: Dinesh D'Souza

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684825244

Category: Philosophy

Page: 756

View: 4512

Presents the author's definition of racism, arguing that it is a cultural phenomenon specific to Western regions and tracing its history while evaluating its potential to end
Posted in Philosophy

Arc of Justice

A Saga of Race, Civil Rights, and Murder in the Jazz Age

Author: Kevin Boyle

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429900164

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 9470

An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Ossian Sweet, a proud Negro doctor-grandson of a slave-had made the long climb from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood. Yet just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. And so it began-a chain of events that brought America's greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of equality. Historian Kevin Boyle weaves the police investigation and courtroom drama of Sweet's murder trial into an unforgettable tapestry of narrative history that documents the volatile America of the 1920s and movingly re-creates the Sweet family's journey from slavery through the Great Migration to the middle class. Ossian Sweet's story, so richly and poignantly captured here, is an epic tale of one man trapped by the battles of his era's changing times. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.
Posted in History

A Nation on Trial

The Goldhagen Thesis and Historical Truth

Author: Norman G. Finkelstein,Ruth Bettina Birn

Publisher: Holt Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780805058727

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 6469

No recent work of history has generated as much interest as Daniel Jonah Goldhagen's Hitler's Willing Executioners. Purporting to solve the mystery of the Nazi holocaust, Goldhagen maintains that ordinary Germans were driven by fanatical anti-Semitism to murder the Jews. An immediate national best-seller, the book went on to create an international sensation. Now, in A Nation on Trial, two leading critics challenge Goldhagen's findings and show that his work is not scholarship at all. With compelling cumulative effect, Norman G. Finkelstein meticulously documents Goldhagen's distortions of secondary literature and the internal contradictions of his argument. In a complementary essay, Ruth Bettina Birn juxtaposes Goldhagen's text against the German archives he consulted. The foremost international authority on these archives, Birn conclusively demonstrates that Goldhagen systematically misrepresented their contents. The definitive statement on the Goldhagen phenomenon, this volume is also a cautionary tale on the corruption of scholarship by ideological zealotry.
Posted in History