Providence and Empire

Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom, 1815-1914

Author: Stewart Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317885341

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 9471

The 19th century was, to a large extent, the ‘British century’. Great Britain was the great world power and its institutions, beliefs and values had an immense impact on the world far beyond its formal empire. Providence and Empire argues that knowledge of the religious thought of the time is crucial in understanding the British imperial story. The churches of the United Kingdom were the greatest suppliers of missionaries to the world, and there was a widespread belief that Britain had a divine mission to spread Christianity and civilisation, to eradicate slavery, and to help usher in the millennium; the Empire had a providential purpose in the world. This is the first connected account of the interactions of religion, politics and society in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales between 1815 and 1914. Providence and Empire is essential reading for any student who wishes to gain an insight into the social, political and cultural life of this period.
Posted in History

Providence and Empire, Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom, 1815-1914

Author: CTI Reviews

Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews

ISBN: 1467286907

Category: Education

Page: 228

View: 8680

Facts101 is your complete guide to Providence and Empire, Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom, 1815-1914. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
Posted in Education

Eighteenth Century Britain

Religion and Politics 1714-1815

Author: Nigel Yates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317866479

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 6061

The church of the eighteenth century was still reeling in the wake of the huge religious upheavals of the two previous centuries. Though this was a comparatively quiet period, this book shows that for the whole period, religion was a major factor in the lives of virtually everybody living in Britain and Ireland. Yates argues that the established churches, Anglican in England, Irelandand Wales, and Presbyterian in Scotland, were an integral part of the British constitution, an arrangement staunchly defended by churchmen and politicians alike. The book also argues that, although there was a close relationship between church and state in this period, there was also limited recognition of other religions. This led to Britain becoming a diverse religious society much earlier than most other parts of Europe. During the same period competition between different religious groups encouraged ecclesiastical reforms throughout all the different churches in Britain.
Posted in History

Religion, Politics and Society in Britain, 800-1066

Author: A E Redgate

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317805348

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 4244

Using a comparative and broad perspective, Religion, Politics and Society in Britain 800-1066 draws on archaeology, art history, material culture, texts from charms to chronicles, from royal law-codes to sermons to poems, and other evidence to demonstrate the centrality of Christianity and the Church in Britain 800-1066. It delineates their contributions to the changes in politics, economy, society and culture that occurred between 800 and 1066, from nation-building to practicalities of government to landscape. The period 800-1066 saw the beginnings of a fundamental restructuring of politics, society and economy throughout Christian Europe in which religion played a central role. In Britain too the interaction of religion with politics and society was profound and pervasive. There was no part of life which Christianity and the Church did not touch: they affected belief, thought and behaviour at all levels of society. This book points out interconnections within society and between archaeological, art historical and literary evidence and similarities between aspects of culture not only within Britain but also in comparison with Armenian Christendom. A. E. Redgate explores the importance of religious ideas, institutions, personnel and practices in the creation and expression of identities and communities, the structure and functioning of society and the life of the individual. This book will be essential reading for students of early medieval Britain and religious and social history.
Posted in History

Ourselves and Others

Author: Graeme Morton

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748655182

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4202

Graeme Morton shows that identity, like industry, is a key element in explaining the period 1832-1914. Ourselves and Others is about 'us and them', the dialectic of national identity formation.
Posted in History

Conflict, Conquest, and Conversion

Two Thousand Years of Christian Missions in the Middle East

Author: Eleanor H. Tejirian,Reeva Spector Simon

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511094

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1856

Conflict, Conquest, and Conversion surveys two thousand years of the Christian missionary enterprise in the Middle East within the context of the region's political evolution. Its broad, rich narrative follows Christian missions as they interacted with imperial powers and as the momentum of religious change shifted from Christianity to Islam and back, adding new dimensions to the history of the region and the nature of the relationship between the Middle East and the West. Historians and political scientists increasingly recognize the importance of integrating religion into political analysis, and this volume, using long-neglected sources, uniquely advances this effort. It surveys Christian missions from the earliest days of Christianity to the present, paying particular attention to the role of Christian missions, both Protestant and Catholic, in shaping the political and economic imperialism of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Eleanor H. Tejirian and Reeva Spector Simon delineate the ongoing tensions between conversion and the focus on witness and "good works" within the missionary movement, which contributed to the development and spread of nongovernmental organizations. Through its conscientious, systematic study, this volume offers an unparalleled encounter with the social, political, and economic consequences of such trends.
Posted in History

Nationhood, Providence, and Witness

Israel in Protestant Theology and Social Theory

Author: Carys Moseley

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1621896765

Category: Religion

Page: 302

View: 3611

This book argues that problems with recognizing the State of Israel lie at the heart of approaches to nationhood and unease over nationalism in modern Protestant theology, as well as modern social theory. Three interrelated themes are explored. The first is the connection between a theologian's attitude to recognizing Israel and their approach to the providential place of nations in the divine economy. Following from this, the argument is made that theologians' handling of both modern and ancient Israel is mirrored profoundly in the question of recognition and ethical treatment of the nations to which they belong, along with neighboring nations. The third theme is how social theory, represented by certain key figures, has handled the same issues. Four major theologians are discussed: Reinhold Niebuhr, Rowan Williams, John Milbank, and Karl Barth. Alongside them are placed social theorists and scholars of religion and nationalism, including Mark Juergensmeyer, Philip Jenkins, Anthony Smith, and Adrian Hastings. In the process, debates over the relationship between theology and social theory are reconfigured in concrete terms around the challenge of recognition of the State of Israel as well as stateless nations.
Posted in Religion

The Oxford Movement

Europe and the Wider World 1830–1930

Author: Stewart J. Brown,Peter B. Nockles

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139510673

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 7001

The Oxford Movement transformed the nineteenth-century Church of England with a renewed conception of itself as a spiritual body. Initiated in the early 1830s by members of the University of Oxford, it was a response to threats to the established Church posed by British Dissenters, Irish Catholics, Whig and Radical politicians, and the predominant evangelical ethos - what Newman called 'the religion of the day'. The Tractarians believed they were not simply addressing difficulties within their national Church, but recovering universal principles of the Christian faith. To what extent were their beliefs and ideals communicated globally? Was missionary activity the product of the movement's distinctive principles? Did their understanding of the Church promote, or inhibit, closer relations among the churches of the global Anglican Communion? This volume addresses these questions and more with a series of case studies involving Europe and the English-speaking world during the first century of the Movement.
Posted in Religion

Robert Southey and Romantic Apostasy

Political Argument in Britain, 1780-1840

Author: David Marcellus Craig

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 0861932919

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 6638

A fresh and sympathetic interpretation of Robert Southey's changing social and political ideas, shedding new light on contemporary thought.
Posted in History

Sacred and Secular Agency in Early Modern France

Fragments of Religion

Author: Sanja Perovic

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441185291

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 3379

Challenging the master narrative of secularization, an exploration of the persistent influence of religious categories in the cultural landscape of Europe's first secular state.
Posted in Social Science

Empires of Religion

Author: Hilary M. Carey

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: 9780230208803

Category: Religion

Page: 350

View: 8629

This book is a sparkling new collection on religion and imperialism, covering Ireland and Britain, Australia, Canada, the Cape Colony and New Zealand, Botswana and Madagascar. Bursting with accounts of lively characters and incidents from around the British world, this collection is essential reading for all students of religious and imperial history.
Posted in Religion

An Imperial State at War

Britain From 1689-1815

Author: Lawrence Stone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134546025

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 9018

The study of eighteenth century history has been transformed by the writings of John Brewer, and most recently, with The Sinews of Power, he challenged the central concepts of British history. Brewer argues that the power of the British state increased dramatically when it was forced to pay the costs of war in defence of her growing empire. In An Imperial State at War, edited by Lawrence Stone (himself no stranger to controversy), the leading historians of the eighteenth century put the Brewer thesis under the spotlight. Like the Sinews of Power itself, this is a major advance in the study of Britain's first empire.
Posted in History

Religion Versus Empire?

British Protestant Missionaries and Overseas Expansion, 1700-1914

Author: Andrew Porter

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719028236

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 8524

This is the only book that addresses the relations between religion, Protestant missions, and empire building, linking together all three fields of study by taking as its starting point the early eighteenth century Anglican initiatives in colonial North America and the Caribbean. It considers how the early societies of the 1790s built on this inheritance, and extended their own interests to the Pacific, India, the Far East, and Africa. Fluctuations in the vigor and commitment of the missions, changing missionary theologies, and the emergence of alternative missionary strategies, are all examined for their impact on imperial expansion. Other themes include the international character of the missionary movement, Christianity's encounter with Islam, and major figures such as David Livingstone, the state and politics, and humanitarianism, all of which are viewed in a fresh light.
Posted in History

Women and Religion in England, 1500-1720

Author: Patricia M. Crawford

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415016964

Category: Religion

Page: 268

View: 7205

Patricia Crawford demonstrates how the consideration of gender is central to our understanding of religious history. Women and Religion has three broad themes: the role and experience of women in the religious upheaval in the period from the Reformation to the Restoration; the significance of religion to contemporary women, focusing on the range of practices and beliefs; and the gendered nature of religious beliefs, institutions and language in the early modern period.
Posted in Religion

Empire and Scottish Society

The Impact of Foreign Missions at Home, C.1790 to C.1914

Author: Esther Breitenbach

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 4091

This book examines how participation in the British Empire shaped constructions of Scottish national identity. It makes an important contribution to our understanding of 19th-century and early 20th-century Scottish society through its original use of a wide range of primary sources, and covers new ground in its assessment of the impact of empire at home.Esther Breitenbach shows how, in the course of the 19th century, Scots acquired a knowledge of empire and voiced opinions on imperial administration and on imperialism itself through philanthropic and religious, learned and scientific, and imperial propagandist activities. She explores the role that the foreign mission movement of the leading Presbyterian churches played in creating a vision of empire. And, focusing on Edinburgh as a case study, she discusses the social basis of support for the movement, including the increasingly prominent role played by women.Through analysing writings by and about missionaries in the missionary and secular press, Empire and Scottish Society asks how the foreign mission movement came to be a source of national pride, and provides new insights into the shaping of Scottish national identity and its relationship to the concept of Britishness.
Posted in History

Civilians and War in Europe 1618-1815

Author: Erica Charters,Eve Rosenhaft,Hannah Smith

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 1781388938

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3436

Civilians and War in Europe 1618-1815 examines the relationship between civilians and warfare from the start of the Thirty Years War to the end of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. The volume interrogates received narratives of warfare that identify the development of modern 'total' war with the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and instead considers the continuities and transformations in warfare over the course of two hundred years. The contributors examine prisoners of war, the cultures of plunder, the tensions of billeting, and war-time atrocities throughout England, France, Spain, and the German territories. They also explore the legal practices surrounding the conduct and aftermath of war; representations of civilians, soldiers, and militias; and the philosophical underpinnings of warfare. They probe what it meant to be a civilian in territories beset by invasion and civil war or in times when 'peace' at home was accompanied by almost continuous military engagement abroad. Their accounts show us civilians not only as anguished sufferers, but also directly involved with war: fighting back with shocking violence, profiting from war-time needs, and negotiating for material and social redress. And they show us individuals and societies coming to terms with the moral and political challenges posed by the business of drawing lines between 'civilians' and 'soldiers'. With contributors drawn from the fields of political and legal theory, literature and the visual arts, and military, political, social, and cultural history, this volume will appeal to all those with an interest in the history of warfare and the evolution of the idea of the civilian.
Posted in History

The Sense of Power

Studies In the Ideas of Canadian Imperialism, 1867-1914, Second Edition

Author: Carl Berger

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 144261577X

Category: History

Page: 277

View: 7556

Prior to the publication of The Sense of Power most studies of the Canadian movement for imperial unity focused on commercial policy and military and naval cooperation. This influential book demonstrated that the movement – which held that Canada could only become a great nation within the British Empire – was significantly influenced by its leading advocates' belief in nationalism. Carl Berger explores the emotional appeal and intellectual context of this belief, arguing that these advocates' support of imperial unity can be grasped only in terms of their commitment to certain conservative values and in relation to their conception of Canada. The Sense of Power was commended by the Toronto Star when it was first published as “entertaining as well as brilliant,” and in 2011 Ramsay Cook noted that “few first books, or for that matter few books, have made as marked an impact on the interpretation of a major theme in Canadian history.” This second edition brings to life the work's incisive analysis and its important contribution to Canadian intellectual history.
Posted in History

Builders of Empire

Freemasons and British Imperialism, 1717-1927

Author: Jessica L. Harland-Jacobs

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606658

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 2154

They built some of the first communal structures on the empire's frontiers. The empire's most powerful proconsuls sought entrance into their lodges. Their public rituals drew dense crowds from Montreal to Madras. The Ancient Free and Accepted Masons were quintessential builders of empire, argues Jessica Harland-Jacobs. In this first study of the relationship between Freemasonry and British imperialism, Harland-Jacobs takes readers on a journey across two centuries and five continents, demonstrating that from the moment it left Britain's shores, Freemasonry proved central to the building and cohesion of the British Empire. The organization formally emerged in 1717 as a fraternity identified with the ideals of Enlightenment cosmopolitanism, such as universal brotherhood, sociability, tolerance, and benevolence. As Freemasonry spread to Europe, the Americas, Asia, Australasia, and Africa, the group's claims of cosmopolitan brotherhood were put to the test. Harland-Jacobs examines the brotherhood's role in diverse colonial settings and the impact of the empire on the brotherhood; in the process, she addresses issues of globalization, supranational identities, imperial power, fraternalism, and masculinity. By tracking an important, identifiable institution across the wide chronological and geographical expanse of the British Empire, Builders of Empire makes a significant contribution to transnational history as well as the history of the Freemasons and imperial Britain.
Posted in Social Science