Providence and Empire

Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom, 1815-1914

Author: Stewart Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317885341

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 3193

The 19th century was, to a large extent, the ‘British century’. Great Britain was the great world power and its institutions, beliefs and values had an immense impact on the world far beyond its formal empire. Providence and Empire argues that knowledge of the religious thought of the time is crucial in understanding the British imperial story. The churches of the United Kingdom were the greatest suppliers of missionaries to the world, and there was a widespread belief that Britain had a divine mission to spread Christianity and civilisation, to eradicate slavery, and to help usher in the millennium; the Empire had a providential purpose in the world. This is the first connected account of the interactions of religion, politics and society in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales between 1815 and 1914. Providence and Empire is essential reading for any student who wishes to gain an insight into the social, political and cultural life of this period.
Posted in History

Religion, Politics and Society in Britain, 800-1066

Author: A E Redgate

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317805356

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 9161

Using a comparative and broad perspective, Religion, Politics and Society in Britain 800-1066 draws on archaeology, art history, material culture, texts from charms to chronicles, from royal law-codes to sermons to poems, and other evidence to demonstrate the centrality of Christianity and the Church in Britain 800-1066. It delineates their contributions to the changes in politics, economy, society and culture that occurred between 800 and 1066, from nation-building to practicalities of government to landscape. The period 800-1066 saw the beginnings of a fundamental restructuring of politics, society and economy throughout Christian Europe in which religion played a central role. In Britain too the interaction of religion with politics and society was profound and pervasive. There was no part of life which Christianity and the Church did not touch: they affected belief, thought and behaviour at all levels of society. This book points out interconnections within society and between archaeological, art historical and literary evidence and similarities between aspects of culture not only within Britain but also in comparison with Armenian Christendom. A. E. Redgate explores the importance of religious ideas, institutions, personnel and practices in the creation and expression of identities and communities, the structure and functioning of society and the life of the individual. This book will be essential reading for students of early medieval Britain and religious and social history.
Posted in History

Religion, Politics and Society in Britain 1066-1272

Author: Henry Mayr-Harting

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317876628

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 765

The period from 1066 to 1272, from the Norman Conquest to the death of Henry III, was one of enormous political change in England and of innovation in the Church as a whole. Religion, Politics and Society 1066-1272 charts the many ways in which a constantly changing religious culture impacted on a social and political system which was itself dominated by clerics, from the parish to the kingdom. Examining the various ways in which churchmen saw their relation to secular power, Henry Mayr-Harting introduces many of the great personalities of the time, such as Thomas Becket and Robert Grosseteste. At the same time he shows how religion itself changed over the course of two centuries, in response to changing social conditions – how rising population fuelled the economic activities of the monasteries, and how parish reform demanded a more educated clergy and by this increased the social prestige of the Church. Written by an acknowledged master in the field, this magisterial account will be an unmissable read for all students of Norman and Plantagenet England and of the history of the medieval Church as a political, social and spiritual force.
Posted in History

Providence and Empire, Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom, 1815-1914

Author: CTI Reviews

Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews

ISBN: 1467286907

Category: Education

Page: 228

View: 7446

Facts101 is your complete guide to Providence and Empire, Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom, 1815-1914. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
Posted in Education

Eighteenth Century Britain

Religion and Politics 1714-1815

Author: Nigel Yates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317866479

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 2148

The church of the eighteenth century was still reeling in the wake of the huge religious upheavals of the two previous centuries. Though this was a comparatively quiet period, this book shows that for the whole period, religion was a major factor in the lives of virtually everybody living in Britain and Ireland. Yates argues that the established churches, Anglican in England, Irelandand Wales, and Presbyterian in Scotland, were an integral part of the British constitution, an arrangement staunchly defended by churchmen and politicians alike. The book also argues that, although there was a close relationship between church and state in this period, there was also limited recognition of other religions. This led to Britain becoming a diverse religious society much earlier than most other parts of Europe. During the same period competition between different religious groups encouraged ecclesiastical reforms throughout all the different churches in Britain.
Posted in History

The Conversion of Britain

Religion, Politics and Society in Britain, 600-800

Author: Barbara Yorke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317868315

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 3474

The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples; the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. They spoke 3 different languages, Gaelic, Brittonic and Old English, and lived in a diverse cultural environment. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts occurred somewhat later, at the end of the 6th and during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and the rulers of different areas of Britain dictated the nature of the dominant religion in areas under their control. This book uses the Conversion and the Christianisation of the different peoples of Britainas a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their society. Because Christianity adapted to and affected the existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it’s the perfect medium through which to study various aspects of society that are difficult to study by any other means.
Posted in History

Population, Providence and Empire

Author: Sarah Roddy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0719090199

Category: History

Page: 275

View: 8141

Over seven million people left Ireland over the course of the nineteenth century. This book is the first to put that huge population change in its religious context, by asking how the Irish Catholic, Anglican and Presbyterian churches responded to mass emigration. Did they facilitate it, object to it, or limit it? Were the three Irish churches themelves changed by this demographic upheaval? Focusing on the effects of emigration on Ireland rather than its diaspora, and merging two of the most important phenomena in the story of modern Ireland – mass emigration and religious change – this study offers new insights into both nineteenth-century Irish history and historical migration studies in general. Its five thematic chapters lead to a conclusion that, on balance, emigration determined the churches' fates to a far greater extent than the churches determined emigrants' fates.
Posted in History

Building the Empire State

Political Economy in the Early Republic

Author: Brian Phillips Murphy

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812247167

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1079

Building the Empire State examines the origins of American capitalism by tracing how and why business corporations were first introduced into the economy of the early republic. Brian Phillips Murphy follows the collaborations between political leaders and a group of unelected political entrepreneurs, including Robert R. Livingston and Alexander Hamilton, who persuaded legislative powers to grant monopolies corporate status in order to finance and manage civic institutions. Murphy shows how American capitalism grew out of the convergence of political and economic interests, wherein political culture was shaped by business strategies and institutions as much as the reverse. Focusing on the state of New York, a onetime mercantile colony that became home to the first American banks, utilities, canals, and transportation infrastructure projects, Building the Empire State surveys the changing institutional ecology during the first five decades following the American Revolution. Through sustained attention to the Manhattan Company, the steamboat monopoly, the Erie Canal, and the New York & Erie Railroad, Murphy traces the ways entrepreneurs marshaled political and financial capital to sway legislators to support their private plans and interests. By playing a central role in the creation and regulation of institutions that facilitated private commercial transactions, New York State's political officials created formal and informal precedents for the political economy throughout the northeastern United States and toward the expanding westward frontier. The political, economic, and legal consequences organizing the marketplace in this way continue to be felt in the vast influence and privileged position held by corporations in the present day.
Posted in History

God and Gold

Britain, America, and the Making of the Modern World

Author: Walter Russell Mead

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307472728

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 464

View: 1632

A stunningly insightful account of the global political and economic system, sustained first by Britain and now by America, that has created the modern world. The key to the two countries' predominance, Mead argues, lies in the individualistic ideology inherent in the Anglo-American religion. Over the years Britain and America's liberal democratic system has been repeatedly challeged—by Catholic Spain and Louis XIV, the Nazis, communists, and Al Qaeda—and for the most part, it has prevailed. But the current conflicts in the Middle East threaten to change that record unless we foster a deeper understanding of the conflicts between the liberal world system and its foes. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in Business & Economics

Religion and Society in England, 1850-1914

Author: Hugh McLeod

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: 9780333534908

Category: Christian sociology

Page: 267

View: 3140

The book examines the evidence and evaluates the many, and contradictory, theories that have been advanced to explain why this happened.
Posted in Christian sociology

Household Gods

The British and Their Possessions

Author: Deborah Cohen

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300112139

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 7828

At what point did the British develop their mania for interiors, wallpaper, furniture, and decoration? Richly illustrated, 'Household Gods' chronicles 100 years of British interiors, focusing on class, choice, shopping and possessions.
Posted in History

Sacred and Secular Agency in Early Modern France

Fragments of Religion

Author: Sanja Perovic

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441185291

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 4704

Challenging the master narrative of secularization, an exploration of the persistent influence of religious categories in the cultural landscape of Europe's first secular state.
Posted in Social Science

Ourselves and Others

Author: Graeme Morton

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748655182

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3142

Graeme Morton shows that identity, like industry, is a key element in explaining the period 1832-1914. Ourselves and Others is about 'us and them', the dialectic of national identity formation.
Posted in History

Religion, Magic, and the Origins of Science in Early Modern England

Author: John Henry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351219286

Category: Science

Page: 328

View: 713

In these articles John Henry argues on the one hand for the intimate relationship between religion and early modern attempts to develop new understandings of nature, and on the other hand for the role of occult concepts in early modern natural philosophy. Focussing on the scene in England, the articles provide detailed examinations of the religious motivations behind Roman Catholic efforts to develop a new mechanical philosophy, theories of the soul and immaterial spirits, and theories of active matter. There are also important studies of animism in the beginnings of experimentalism, the role of occult qualities in the mechanical philosophy, and a new account of the decline of magic. As well as general surveys, the collection includes in depth studies of William Gilbert, Sir Kenelm Digby, Henry More, Francis Glisson, Robert Boyle, Robert Hooke, and Isaac Newton.
Posted in Science

Conflict, Conquest, and Conversion

Two Thousand Years of Christian Missions in the Middle East

Author: Eleanor H. Tejirian,Reeva Spector Simon

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511094

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 408

Conflict, Conquest, and Conversion surveys two thousand years of the Christian missionary enterprise in the Middle East within the context of the region's political evolution. Its broad, rich narrative follows Christian missions as they interacted with imperial powers and as the momentum of religious change shifted from Christianity to Islam and back, adding new dimensions to the history of the region and the nature of the relationship between the Middle East and the West. Historians and political scientists increasingly recognize the importance of integrating religion into political analysis, and this volume, using long-neglected sources, uniquely advances this effort. It surveys Christian missions from the earliest days of Christianity to the present, paying particular attention to the role of Christian missions, both Protestant and Catholic, in shaping the political and economic imperialism of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Eleanor H. Tejirian and Reeva Spector Simon delineate the ongoing tensions between conversion and the focus on witness and "good works" within the missionary movement, which contributed to the development and spread of nongovernmental organizations. Through its conscientious, systematic study, this volume offers an unparalleled encounter with the social, political, and economic consequences of such trends.
Posted in History

Manifest Destiny

American Expansion and the Empire of Right

Author: Anders Stephanson

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 0809015846

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 4758

When John O'Sullivan wrote in 1845, "...the right of our manifest destiny to overspread and to possess the whole of the continent which Providence has given us for the development of Liberty and federated self-government entrusted to us", he coined a phrase that aptly describes how Americans from colonial days and into the twentieth century perceived their privileged role. Anders Stephanson examines the consequences of this idea over more than three hundred years of history, as Manifest Destiny drove the westward settlement to the Pacific, defining the stubborn belief in the superiority of white people and denigrating Native Americans and other people of color. He considers it a component in Woodrow Wilson's campaign "to make the world safe for democracy" and a strong factor in Ronald Reagan's administration.
Posted in History

Religion Versus Empire?

British Protestant Missionaries and Overseas Expansion, 1700-1914

Author: Andrew Porter

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719028236

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 5157

This is the only book that addresses the relations between religion, Protestant missions, and empire building, linking together all three fields of study by taking as its starting point the early eighteenth century Anglican initiatives in colonial North America and the Caribbean. It considers how the early societies of the 1790s built on this inheritance, and extended their own interests to the Pacific, India, the Far East, and Africa. Fluctuations in the vigor and commitment of the missions, changing missionary theologies, and the emergence of alternative missionary strategies, are all examined for their impact on imperial expansion. Other themes include the international character of the missionary movement, Christianity's encounter with Islam, and major figures such as David Livingstone, the state and politics, and humanitarianism, all of which are viewed in a fresh light.
Posted in History

Britain since 1688

A Nation in the World

Author: Stephanie Barczewski,John Eglin,Stephen Heathorn,Michael Silvestri,Michelle Tusan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317606590

Category: History

Page: 390

View: 9856

Authored by a team of North American university professors who specialize in the subject, Britain since 1688: A Nation in the World has been specifically written for students in the United States, or from other countries where pre-existing knowledge of the history of Britain cannot be taken for granted. Beginning with the Glorious Revolution of 1688, the book progresses through the major events of the next three-and-a-half centuries, up to the coalition government of the present day. It uses a traditional chronological structure and provides a strong backbone of political history, but incorporates contemporary thematic concerns and the most recent scholarship throughout. The authors provide coverage of all parts of the British Isles individually as well as treating them as an integrated whole, and key aspects of British society are examined, including class, race, religion and gender – a focus that allows the complexities of British national identity and the historical unity and disunity of the British Isles to be assessed. Britain’s interaction with the world features prominently, including extensive coverage of the British Empire, both as a political, military and geographic entity and as a force of cultural influence on the British metropolis. The complexities of Britain’s relationship with the United States are explored in detail, ranging from the American Revolution in the eighteenth century to the "special relationship" established by the twentieth. Featuring textboxes containing illustrative examples that support the main text, images intended to inspire discussion, and a comprehensive companion website with an interactive timeline that includes links to primary documents, images and video, this book provides everything needed to give students a comprehensive grounding in the rich tapestry of events, characters, and themes that encompass the history of Britain since 1688.
Posted in History

Making Haste from Babylon

The Mayflower Pilgrims and Their World: A New History

Author: Nick Bunker

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307593002

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 660

At the end of 1618, a blazing green star soared across the night sky over the northern hemisphere. From the Philippines to the Arctic, the comet became a sensation and a symbol, a warning of doom or a promise of salvation. Two years later, as the Pilgrims prepared to sail across the Atlantic on board the Mayflower, the atmosphere remained charged with fear and expectation. Men and women readied themselves for war, pestilence, or divine retribution. Against this background, and amid deep economic depression, the Pilgrims conceived their enterprise of exile. Within a decade, despite crisis and catastrophe, they built a thriving settlement at New Plymouth, based on beaver fur, corn, and cattle. In doing so, they laid the foundations for Massachusetts, New England, and a new nation. Using a wealth of new evidence from landscape, archaeology, and hundreds of overlooked or neglected documents, Nick Bunker gives a vivid and strikingly original account of the Mayflower project and the first decade of the Plymouth Colony. From mercantile London and the rural England of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I to the mountains and rivers of Maine, he weaves a rich narrative that combines religion, politics, money, science, and the sea. The Pilgrims were entrepreneurs as well as evangelicals, political radicals as well as Christian idealists. Making Haste from Babylon tells their story in unrivaled depth, from their roots in religious conflict and village strife at home to their final creation of a permanent foothold in America. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in History

Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean

Author: Irad Malkin,Christy Constantakopoulou,Katerina Panagopoulou

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317991133

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 6689

How useful is the concept of "network" for historical studies and the ancient world in particular? Using theoretical models of social network analysis, this book illuminates aspects of the economic, social, religious, and political history of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Bringing together some of the most active and prominent researchers in ancient history, this book moves beyond political institutions, ethnic, and geographical boundaries in order to observe the ancient Mediterranean through a perspective of network interaction. It employs a wide range of approaches, and to examine relationships and interactions among various social entities in the Mediterranean. Chronologically, the book extends from the early Iron Age to the late Antique world, covering the Mediterranean between Antioch in the east to Massalia (Marseilles) in the west. This book was published as two special issues in Mediterranean Historical Review.
Posted in Business & Economics