Post-war Caribbean Migration to Britain

The Unfinished Cycle

Author: Margaret Byron

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 221

View: 3475

This book presents the first study of Caribbean migration to Britain which examines, in turn, the out migration from the Caribbean, settlement in Britain and the return element of the migration cycle.
Posted in Social Science

Lovers and Strangers

An Immigrant History of Post-War Britain

Author: Clair Wills

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141974966

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 9379

TLS BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2017 'Generous and empathetic ... opens up postwar migration in all its richness' Sukhdev Sandhu, Guardian 'Groundbreaking, sophisticated, original, open-minded ... essential reading for anyone who wants to understand not only the transformation of British society after the war but also its character today' Piers Brendon, Literary Review 'Lyrical, full of wise and original observations' David Goodhart, The Times The battered and exhausted Britain of 1945 was desperate for workers - to rebuild, to fill the factories, to make the new NHS work. From all over the world and with many motives, thousands of individuals took the plunge. Most assumed they would spend just three or four years here, sending most of their pay back home, but instead large numbers stayed - and transformed the country. Drawing on an amazing array of unusual and surprising sources, Clair Wills' wonderful new book brings to life the incredible diversity and strangeness of the migrant experience. She introduces us to lovers, scroungers, dancers, homeowners, teachers, drinkers, carers and many more to show the opportunities and excitement as much as the humiliation and poverty that could be part of the new arrivals' experience. Irish, Bengalis, West Indians, Poles, Maltese, Punjabis and Cypriots battled to fit into an often shocked Britain and, to their own surprise, found themselves making permanent homes. As Britain picked itself up again in the 1950s migrants set about changing life in their own image, through music, clothing, food, religion, but also fighting racism and casual and not so casual violence. Lovers and Strangers is an extremely important book, one that is full of enjoyable surprises, giving a voice to a generation who had to deal with the reality of life surrounded by 'white strangers' in their new country.
Posted in History

Migration in Comparative Perspective

Caribbean Communities in Britain and France

Author: Margaret Byron,Stéphanie Condon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113438839X

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 9220

This book presents a comparative perspective on post-war Caribbean migration to Britain and France. Both migrations were responses to the link between former colonies and colonial powers. However, the movements of labor occurred within separately and differently evolving political contexts, affecting the migration outcomes. Today, Caribbean communities in Europe display complex features of continuity and change. Condon and Byron examine trends in migration patterns, household and family structures, social fields, employment and housing trajectories in detail. This systematic comparison with its innovative focus on gender and life-course, is an excellent addition to the existing literature on the Caribbean diaspora.
Posted in Social Science

Gendering Migration

Masculinity, Femininity and Ethnicity in Post-War Britain

Author: Wendy Webster

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351934333

Category: Social Science

Page: 222

View: 9734

Gendering Migration demonstrates the significance of studying migration through the lens of gender and ethnicity and the contribution this perspective makes to migration histories. Through a consideration of the impact of migration on men and masculine identities as well as women and feminine identities, it extends our understanding of questions of gender and migration, focusing on the history of migration to Britain after the Second World War. The volume draws on oral narratives as well as documentary and archival research to demonstrate the important role played by gender and ethnicity, both in ideas and images of migrants and in migrants' own experiences. The contributors consider a range of migrant and refugee groups who came to Britain in the twentieth century: Caribbean, East-African Asian, German, Greek, Irish, Kurdish, Pakistani, Polish and Spanish. The fresh interpretations offered here make this an important new book for scholars and students of migration, ethnicity, gender and modern British history.
Posted in Social Science

Creole Discourse

Exploring Prestige Formation and Change Across Caribbean English-lexicon Creoles

Author: N.A

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027252463

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 331

View: 888

Creole languages are characteristically associated with a negative image. How has this prestige been formed? And is it as static as the diglossic situation in many anglo-creolophone societies seems to suggest? This volume examines socio-historical and epistemological factors in the prestige formation of Caribbean English-Lexicon Creoles and subjects their classification as a (socio)linguistic type to scrutiny and critical debate. In its analysis of rich empirical data this study also demonstrates that the uses, functions and negotiations of Creole within particular social and linguistic practices have shifted considerably. Rather than limiting its scope to one "national" speech community, the discussion focusses on changes of the social meaning of Creole in various discursive fields, such as inter generational changes of Creole use in the London Diaspora, diachronic changes of Creole representation in written texts, and diachronic changes of Creole representation in translation. The study employs a discourse analytical approach drawing on linguistic models as well as Foucauldian theory.
Posted in Language Arts & Disciplines

London Is the Place for Me

Black Britons, Citizenship and the Politics of Race

Author: Kennetta Hammond Perry

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190240202

Category: Africa

Page: 336

View: 9667

Black people in the British Empire have long challenged the notion that "there ain't no black in the Union Jack." For the post-World War II wave of Afro-Caribbean migrants, many of whom had long been subjects of the Empire, claims to a British identity and imperial citizenship were considered to be theirs by birthright. However, while Britain was internationally touted as a paragon of fair play and equal justice, they arrived in a nation that was frequently hostile and unwilling to incorporate Black people into its concept of what it meant to be British. Black Britons therefore confronted the racial politics of British citizenship and became active political agents in challenging anti-Black racism. In a society with a highly racially circumscribed sense of identity-and the laws, customs, and institutions to back it up-Black Britons had to organize and fight to assert their right to belong. In London Is The Place for Me, Kennetta Hammond Perry explores how Afro-Caribbean migrants navigated the politics of race and citizenship in Britain and reconfigured the boundaries of what it meant to be both Black and British at a critical juncture in the history of Empire and twentieth century transnational race politics. She situates their experience within a broader context of Black imperial and diasporic political participation, and examines the pushback-both legal and physical-that the migrants' presence provoked. Bringing together a variety of sources including calypso music, photographs, migrant narratives, and records of grassroots Black political organizations, London Is the Place for Me positions Black Britons as part of wider public debates both at home and abroad about citizenship, the meaning of Britishness and the politics of race in the second half of the twentieth century. The United Kingdom's postwar discriminatory curbs on immigration and explosion of racial violence forced White Britons as well as Black to question their perception of Britain as a racially progressive society and, therefore, to question the very foundation of their own identities. Perry's examination expands our understanding of race and the Black experience in Europe and uncovers the critical role that Black people played in the formation of contemporary British society.
Posted in Africa

Whitewashing Britain

Race and Citizenship in the Postwar Era

Author: Kathleen Paul

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801484407

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 7729

In the late 1940s, the Labour government faced a birthrate perceived to be in decline, massive economic dislocations caused by the war, a huge national debt, severe labor shortages, and the prospective loss of international preeminence. Simultaneously, it subsidized the emigration of Britons to Australia, Canada, and other parts of the Empire, recruited Irish citizens and European refugees to work in Britain, and used regulatory changes to dissuade British subjects of color from coming to the United Kingdom. Paul contends post-war concepts of citizenship were based on a contradiction between the formal definition of who had the right to enter Britain and the informal notion of who was, or could become, really British.
Posted in History

Contagious Communities

Medicine, Migration, and the NHS in Post War Britain

Author: Roberta Bivins

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198725280

Category: Emigration and immigration

Page: 400

View: 3058

Contagious Communities looks at migration, medicine, race, and politics in post-war Britain from a new angle - through the lens of medical policy-making, health education, and clinical research. It explores the ways in which mass immigration changed British medicine and health services, and how medical claims about the migrants influenced popular and political responses to them (and their children). From smallpox to tuberculosis, from rickets to sicklecell anaemia, how and why did concerns about migrant health influence migration policy and domestic politics? If the NHS was a magnet for migration from around the world, was this because it offered universalaccess to the best of modern medicine, or because of its voracious appetite for healthcare workers at every level? Sifting evidence from government files, medical reports, the popular press, and oral history, Contagious Communities sheds new light on one of the most contentious questions of our day: the impact of immigration on modern Britain.
Posted in Emigration and immigration

The British Dream

Successes and Failures of Post-war Immigration

Author: David Goodhart

Publisher: Atlantic Books

ISBN: 0857899759

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 3186

In The British Dream, David Goodhart tells the story of postwar immigration and charts a course for its future. Drawing on hundreds of interviews with people from all over the country and a wealth of statistical evidence, he paints a striking picture of how Britain has been transformed by immigration and examines the progress of its ethnic minorities—projected to be around 25 per cent of the population by the early 2020s. Britain today is a more open society for minorities than ever before, but it is also a more fragmented one. Goodhart argues that an overzealous multiculturalism has exacerbated this problem by reinforcing difference instead of promoting a common life. The multi-ethnic success of Team GB at the 2012 Olympics and a taste for chicken tikka masala are not, he suggests, sufficient to forge common bonds; Britain needs a political culture of integration. Goodhart concludes that if Britain is to avoid a narrowing of the public realm and sharply segregated cities, as in many parts of the U.S., its politicians and opinion leaders must do two things. Firstly, as advocated by the center right, they need to bring immigration down to more moderate and sustainable levels. Secondly, as advocated by the center left, they need to shape a progressive national story about openness and opportunity, one that captures how people of different traditions are coming together to make the British dream.
Posted in Social Science

Caribbean Migration

Globalized Identities

Author: Mary Chamberlain

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134707673

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 3431

This anthology represents important and original directions in the study of Caribbean migration. It takes a comparative perspective on the Caribbean people's migratory experiences to North America, Europe, and within the Caribbean. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the book discusses: * the causes of migration * the experiences of migrants * the historical, cultural and political processes * issues of gender and imperialism * the methodology of migration studies, including oral history.
Posted in History

Windrush

The Irresistible Rise of Multi-racial Britain

Author: Mike Phillips,Trevor Phillips

Publisher: Harpercollins Canada

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 422

View: 6649

Offers a historical look at the integration of Great Britain
Posted in Social Science

Decolonizing the Republic

African and Caribbean Migrants in Postwar Paris, 1946–1974

Author: Félix F. Germain

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN: 1628952636

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 939

Decolonizing the Republic is a conscientious discussion of the African diaspora in Paris in the post–World War II period. This book is the first to examine the intersection of black activism and the migration of Caribbeans and Africans to Paris during this era and, as Patrick Manning notes in the foreword, successfully shows how “black Parisians—in their daily labors, weekend celebrations, and periodic protests—opened the way to ‘decolonizing the Republic,’ advancing the respect for their rights as citizens.” Contrasted to earlier works focusing on the black intellectual elite, Decolonizing the Republic maps the formation of a working-class black France. Readers will better comprehend how those peoples of African descent who settled in France and fought to improve their socioeconomic conditions changed the French perception of Caribbean and African identity, laying the foundation for contemporary black activists to deploy a new politics of social inclusion across the demographics of race, class, gender, and nationality. This book complicates conventional understandings of decolonization, and in doing so opens a new and much-needed chapter in the history of the black Atlantic.
Posted in History

Race, Sexuality and Identity in Britain and Jamaica

The Biography of Patrick Nelson, 1916-1963

Author: Gemma Romain

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472588665

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 5280

This is the first biography of the extraordinary, but ordinary life of, Patrick Nelson. His experiences touched on some of the most important and intriguing historical themes of the twentieth century. He was a black migrant to interwar Britain; an aristocrat's valet in rural Wales; a Black queer man in 1930s London; an artist's model; a law student, a recruit to the Auxiliary Military Pioneer Corps and Prisoner of War during the Second World War. Through his return to Jamaica after the war and his re-migrations to London in the late 1940s and the early 1960s, he was also witness to post-war Jamaican struggles and the independence movement as well as the development of London's post-war multi-ethnic migrations. Drawing on a range of archival materials including letters sent to individuals such as Bloomsbury group artist Duncan Grant (his former boyfriend and life-long friend), as well as paintings and newspaper articles, Gemma Romain explores the intersections of these diverse aspects of Nelson's life and demonstrates how such marginalized histories shed light on our understanding of broader historical themes such as Black LGBTQ history, Black British history in relation to the London artworld, the history of the Second World War, and histories of racism, colonialism and empire.
Posted in History

In Search of a Better Life

Perspectives on Migration from the Caribbean

Author: Ransford W. Palmer

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275934095

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 185

View: 9973

This volume's contributors examine the factors that have motivated the historic movement of Caribbean people from their island economies; their social, economic, and cultural adaptation to their new environments; and the impact of the 1986 U.S. immigration laws. Among the issues discussed are the economic conditions that heralded the mass migration of Caribbean labor in the 19th century, differences in educational performance of immigrants in the U.S. and Britain, the characteristics of illegal migration from the Caribbean to the United States, and the tensions that arise as immigrant households adjust to their new environment.
Posted in Business & Economics

The West Indian Generation

Remaking British Culture in London, 1945-1965

Author: Amanda Bidnall

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1786940035

Category: Arts, British

Page: 256

View: 3865

Between Britain's imperial victory in the Second World War and its introduction of race-based immigration restriction 'at home, ' London's relationship with its burgeoning West Indian settler community was a cauldron of apprehension, optimism, ignorance, and curiosity. The West Indian Generation: Remaking British Culture in London, 1945-1965 revisits this not-quite-postcolonial moment through the careers of a unique generation of West Indian artists that included actors Earl Cameron, Edric Connor, Pearl Connor, Cy Grant, Ronald Moody, Barry and Lloyd Reckord, and calypso greats Lord Beginner and Lord Kitchener. Colonial subjects turned British citizens, they tested the parameters of cultural belonging through their work. Drawing upon familiar and neglected artifacts from London's cultural archives, Amanda Bidnall sketches the feathery roots of this community as it was both nurtured and inhibited by metropolitan institutions and producers hoping variously to promote imperial solidarity, educate mainstream audiences, and sensationalize racial conflict. Upon a shared foundation of language, education, and middle-class values, a fascinating collaboration took place between popular West Indian artists and cultural authorities like the Royal Court Theatre, the Rank Organisation, and the BBC. By analyzing the potential - and limits - of this collaboration, Bidnall demonstrates the mainstream influence and perceptive politics of pioneering West Indian artists. Their ambivalent and complicated reception by the British government, media, and populace draws a tangled picture of postwar national belonging. The West Indian Generation is necessary reading for anyone interested in the cultural ramifications of the end of empire, New Commonwealth migration, and the production of Black Britain.
Posted in Arts, British

Radical Moves

Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age

Author: Lara Putnam

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807838136

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6837

In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the cane fields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black-internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century. From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or "jazzing," writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created--from Marcus Garvey's UNIA to "regge" dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis's worldwide fandom--still echoes in the present.
Posted in History

The Emigrants

Author: George Lamming

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472064700

Category: Fiction

Page: 282

View: 7864

A compelling and intricate novel of emigration and the effects of colonialism on a people
Posted in Fiction

Beyond Windrush

Rethinking Postwar Anglophone Caribbean Literature

Author: J. Dillon Brown,Leah Reade Rosenberg

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1628464763

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 4423

This edited collection challenges a long sacrosanct paradigm. Since the establishment of Caribbean literary studies, scholars have exalted an elite cohort of émigré novelists based in postwar London, a group often referred to as “the Windrush writers” in tribute to the SS Empire Windrush, whose 1948 voyage from Jamaica inaugurated large-scale Caribbean migration to London. In critical accounts this group is typically reduced to the canonical troika of V. S. Naipaul, George Lamming, and Sam Selvon, effectively treating these three authors as the tradition’s founding fathers. These “founders” have been properly celebrated for producing a complex, anticolonial, nationalist literature. However, their canonization has obscured the great diversity of postwar Caribbean writers, producing an enduring but narrow definition of West Indian literature. Beyond Windrush stands out as the first book to reexamine and redefine the writing of this crucial era. Its fourteen original essays make clear that in the 1950s there was already a wide spectrum of West Indian men and women—Afro-Caribbean, Indo-Caribbean, and white-creole—who were writing, publishing, and even painting. Many lived in the Caribbean and North America, rather than London. Moreover, these writers addressed subjects overlooked in the more conventionally conceived canon, including topics such as queer sexuality and the environment. This collection offers new readings of canonical authors (Lamming, Roger Mais, and Andrew Salkey); hitherto marginalized authors (Ismith Khan, Elma Napier, and John Hearne); and commonly ignored genres (memoir, short stories, and journalism).
Posted in Literary Criticism

British Immigration Policy Since 1939

The Making of Multi-Racial Britain

Author: Ian R.G. Spencer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134776624

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5496

This is the first survey of British immigration policy to include both its pre-World War Two origins and its development after the crucial 1962 Commonwealth Immigrants Act. It is an accessible introduction to a subject of increasing popularity with students and academics. It also integrates the results of extensive archival research. Offering a different perspective to sociological approaches, British Immigration Policy since 1939 will be of interest to historians, political scientists, and those studying public and social policy.
Posted in History