Popular justice

a history of American criminal justice

Author: Samuel Walker

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195074505

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 9022

This popular one-volume analysis of the evolution of American criminal justice places contemporary issues of crime and justice in historical perspective. Walker identifies the major periods in the development of the American system of criminal justice, from the small institutions of the colonial period to the creation of the police, the prison, and the juvenile court in the nineteenth century and the search for professionalism in the twentieth century. He argues that the democratic tradition is responsible for the worst as well as the best in the history of criminal justice in the United States. Offering a challenging perspective on current controversies in the administration of criminal justice in light of historical origins, the author explores the evolving conflict between the advocates of crime control and the advocates of due process.Now in its second edition, Popular Justice has been completely revised to include the most recent scholarship on crime and justice. Walker has updated his analysis of the history of American criminal justice and explores the tension between popular passions and the rule of law. He examines changing patterns in criminal activity, the institutional development of the system of criminal justice, and the major issues concerning the administration of justice. Timely and comprehensive, this text will be useful for courses in criminal justice, legal history, and criminology.
Posted in History

Popular Justice

A History of American Criminal Justice

Author: Samuel Walker

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195074512

Category: Law

Page: 290

View: 5553

This popular one-volume analysis of the evolution of American criminal justice places contemporary issues of crime and justice in historical perspective. Walker identifies the major periods in the development of the American system of criminal justice, from the small institutions of the colonial period to the creation of the police, the prison, and the juvenile court in the nineteenth century and the search for professionalism in the twentieth century. He argues that the democratic tradition is responsible for the worst as well as the best in the history of criminal justice in the United States. Offering a challenging perspective on current controversies in the administration of criminal justice in light of historical origins, the author explores the evolving conflict between the advocates of crime control and the advocates of due process. Now in its second edition, Popular Justice has been completely revised to include the most recent scholarship on crime and justice. Walker has updated his analysis of the history of American criminal justice and explores the tension between popular passions and the rule of law. He examines changing patterns in criminal activity, the institutional development of the system of criminal justice, and the major issues concerning the administration of justice. Timely and comprehensive, this text will be useful for courses in criminal justice, legal history, and criminology.
Posted in Law

Popular justice

a history of American criminal justice

Author: Samuel Walker

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 287

View: 7418

Posted in Law

Popular Justice

A History of Lynching in America

Author: Manfred Berg

Publisher: Government Institutes

ISBN: 9781566639200

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 6899

Manfred Berg traces the history of lynching in America from the colonial era to the present. Berg focuses on lynching as extralegal communal punishment performed by "ordinary" people. He confronts racially fragmented historical memory and legacies of popular justice to help the reader make better sense of lynching as part of American history.
Posted in History

The Collapse of American Criminal Justice

Author: William J. Stuntz

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674051750

Category: Law

Page: 413

View: 1068

Rule of law has vanished in America’s criminal justice system. Prosecutors decide whom to punish; most accused never face a jury; policing is inconsistent; plea bargaining is rampant; and draconian sentencing fills prisons with mostly minority defendants. A leading criminal law scholar looks to history for the roots of these problems—and solutions.
Posted in Law

Criminal Justice in the United States, 1789–1939

Author: Elizabeth Dale

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139503154

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3545

This book chronicles the development of criminal law in America, from the beginning of the constitutional era (1789) through the rise of the New Deal order (1939). Elizabeth Dale discusses the changes in criminal law during that period, tracing shifts in policing, law, the courts and punishment. She also analyzes the role that popular justice - lynch mobs, vigilance committees, law-and-order societies and community shunning - played in the development of America's criminal justice system. This book explores the relation between changes in America's criminal justice system and its constitutional order.
Posted in History

A History of Modern American Criminal Justice

Author: Joseph F. Spillane,David B. Wolcott

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1506338267

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 4428

In A History of Modern Criminal Justice, authors Joseph Spillane and David Wolcott focus on the modern aspects of the subject, from 1900 to the present. A unique thematic rather than a chronological approach sets this book apart from the competition, with chapters organized around themes such as policing, courts, due process, and prison and punishment. Making connections between history and contemporary criminal justice systems, structures and processes, A History of Modern Criminal Justice offers students the latest in historical scholarship, made relevant to their needs as future practitioners in the field. This book is appropriate for any course on the history of criminal justice.
Posted in Social Science

History of Criminal Justice

Author: Mark Jones,Peter Johnstone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131752246X

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 9585

Covering criminal justice history on a cross-national basis, this book surveys criminal justice in Western civilization and American life chronologically from ancient times to the present. It is an introduction to the historical problems of crime, law enforcement and penology, set against the background of major historical events and movements. Integrating criminal justice history into the scope of European, British, French and American history, this text provides the opportunity for comparisons of crime and punishment over boundaries of national histories. The text now concludes with a chapter that addresses terrorism and homeland security.
Posted in History

Let's Get Free

A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice

Author: Paul Butler

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585109

Category: Law

Page: 224

View: 2372

Drawing on his personal fascinating story as a prosecutor, a defendant, and an observer of the legal process, Paul Butler offers a sharp and engaging critique of our criminal justice system. He argues against discriminatory drug laws and excessive police power and shows how our policy of mass incarceration erodes communities and perpetuates crime. Controversially, he supports jury nullification—or voting “not guilty” out of principle—as a way for everyday people to take a stand against unfair laws, and he joins with the “Stop Snitching” movement, arguing that the reliance on informants leads to shoddy police work and distrust within communities. Butler offers instead a “hip hop theory of justice,” parsing the messages about crime and punishment found in urban music and culture. Butler’s argument is powerful, edgy, and incisive.
Posted in Law

African Americans and Criminal Justice: An Encyclopedia

An Encyclopedia

Author: Delores D. Jones-Brown,Beverly D. Frazier,Marvie Brooks

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 031335717X

Category: Social Science

Page: 631

View: 528

Does justice exist for Blacks in America? This comprehensive compilation of essays documents the historical and contemporary impact of the law and criminal justice system on people of African ancestry in the United States. • 120 A–Z entries on race and criminal justice and famous or infamous African American crime perpetrators or victims • Contributions from more than 50 distinguished scholars from many criminal justice/criminology academic programs across the country • An index of key persons, events, and legislation
Posted in Social Science

Just Mercy (Adapted for Young Adults)

A True Story of the Fight for Justice

Author: Bryan A. Stevenson

Publisher: Delacorte Press

ISBN: 0525580050

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 288

View: 8705

In this young adult adaptation of the acclaimed bestselling Just Mercy, which the New York Times calls "as compelling as To Kill a Mockingbird, and in some ways more so," Bryan Stevenson delves deep into the broken U.S. justice system, detailing from his personal experience his many challenges and efforts as a lawyer and social advocate, especially on behalf of America's most rejected and marginalized people. In this very personal work--proceeds of which will go to charity--Bryan Stevenson recounts many and varied stories of his work as a lawyer in the U.S. criminal justice system on behalf of those in society who have experienced some type of discrimination and/or have been wrongly accused of a crime and who deserve a powerful advocate and due justice under the law. Through the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), an organization Stevenson founded as a young lawyer and for which he currently serves as Executive Director, this important work continues. EJI strives to end mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, working to protect basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society. "A deeply moving collage of true stories . . . .This is required reading." --Kirkus, Starred Review Praise for Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption: "Important and compelling." --Pulitzer Prize-winning author TRACY KIDDER "Gripping. . . . What hangs in the balance is nothing less than the soul of a great nation." --DESMOND TUTU, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate "An inspiring and powerful story." --#1 New York Times bestselling author JOHN GRISHAM
Posted in Young Adult Nonfiction

Law's Imagined Republic

Popular Politics and Criminal Justice in Revolutionary America

Author: Steven Wilf

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521196906

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 2207

Law's Imagined Republic shows how the American Revolution was marked by the rapid proliferation of law talk across the colonies. This legal language was both elite and popular, spanned different forms of expression from words to rituals, and included simultaneously real and imagined law. Since it was employed to mobilize resistance against England, the proliferation of revolutionary legal language became intimately intertwined with politics. Drawing on a wealth of material from criminal cases, Steven Wilf reconstructs the intertextual ways Americans from the 1760s through the 1790s read law: reading one case against another and often self-consciously comparing transatlantic legal systems as they thought about how they might construct their own legal system in a new republic. What transformed extraordinary tales of crime into a political forum? How did different ways of reading or speaking about law shape our legal origins? And, ultimately, how might excavating innovative approaches to law in this formative period, which were constructed in the street as well as in the courtroom, alter our usual understanding of contemporary American legal institutions? Law's Imagined Republic tells the story of the untidy beginnings of American law.
Posted in History

Perfect Victims

Slaughter, Sensation and Serial Killers: An American Criminal Odyssey

Author: Bill James

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0857203924

Category: True Crime

Page: 496

View: 8236

The Black Dahlia case. The Manson murders. The Zodiac Killer. The slaughter of JonBenet Ramsay. These killings, among many others in Bill James's astonishing chronicle of the history of American crime, have all created a frenzy of interest and speculation about human nature. And while many of us choose to avoid the news about gruesome murders, Bill James contends that these crime stories, which create such frenzy (and have throughout history), are as important to understanding our society, culture and history as anything we may consider to be a more 'serious' subject. The topic envelopes our society so completely, we almost forget about it. James looks at the ways in which society has changed by examining the development of how crimes have been committed, investigated and prosecuted. The booktakes on such issues as the rise of an organized police force, the controversial use of the death penalty, the introduction of evidence such as fingerprinting and DNA, and the unexpected ways in which the most shocking crimes have shaped the criminal justice system and our perceptions of violence.
Posted in True Crime

How Do Judges Decide?

The Search for Fairness and Justice in Punishment

Author: Cassia Spohn

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412961041

Category: Law

Page: 357

View: 448

How are sentences for Federal, State, and Local crimes determined in the United States? Is this process fairly and justly applied to all concerned? How have reforms affected the process over the last 25 years? This text for advanced undergraduate students in criminal justice programs seeks to answer these questions.
Posted in Law

The Machinery of Criminal Justice

Author: Stephanos Bibas

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190236760

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 5408

Two centuries ago, American criminal justice was run primarily by laymen. Jury trials passed moral judgment on crimes, vindicated victims and innocent defendants, and denounced the guilty. But since then, lawyers have gradually taken over the process, silencing victims and defendants and, in many cases, substituting plea bargaining for the voice of the jury. The public sees little of how this assembly-line justice works, and victims and defendants have largely lost their day in court. As a result, victims rarely hear defendants express remorse and apologize, and defendants rarely receive forgiveness. This lawyerized machinery has purchased efficient, speedy processing of many cases at the price of sacrificing softer values, such as reforming defendants and healing wounded victims and relationships. In other words, the U.S. legal system has bought quantity at the price of quality, without recognizing either the trade-off or the great gulf separating lawyers' and laymen's incentives, values, and powers. In The Machinery of Criminal Justice, author Stephanos Bibas surveys the developments over the last two centuries, considers what we have lost in our quest for efficient punishment, and suggests ways to include victims, defendants, and the public once again. Ideas range from requiring convicts to work or serve in the military, to moving power from prosecutors to restorative sentencing juries. Bibas argues that doing so might cost more, but it would better serve criminal procedure's interests in denouncing crime, vindicating victims, reforming wrongdoers, and healing the relationships torn by crime.
Posted in Law

The Bail Book

A Comprehensive Look at Bail in America's Criminal Justice System

Author: Shima Baradaran Baughman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107131367

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 854

Examines the causes for mass incarceration of Americans and calls for the reform of the bail system. Traces the history of bail, how it has come to be an oppressive tool of the courts, and makes recommendations for reforming the bail system and alleviating the mass incarceration problem.
Posted in Law

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Crime and Criminal Justice

Author: Paul Knepper,Anja Johansen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199352348

Category: Law

Page: 800

View: 633

The historical study of crime has expanded in criminology during the past few decades, forming an active niche area in social history. Indeed, the history of crime is more relevant than ever as scholars seek to address contemporary issues in criminology and criminal justice. Thus, The Oxford Handbook of the History of Crime and Criminal Justice provides a systematic and comprehensive examination of recent developments across both fields. Chapters examine existing research, explain on-going debates and controversies, and point to new areas of interest, covering topics such as criminal law and courts, police and policing, and the rise of criminology as a field. This Handbook also analyzes some of the most pressing criminological issues of our time, including drug trafficking, terrorism, and the intersections of gender, race, and class in the context of crime and punishment. The definitive volume on the history of crime, The Oxford Handbook of the History of Crime and Criminal Justice is an invaluable resource for students and scholars of criminology, criminal justice, and legal history.
Posted in Law

Criminal Justice Pioneers in U.S. History

Author: Gerald Mark Jones,Mark Jones

Publisher: Allyn & Bacon

ISBN: 9780205359196

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 239

View: 4588

This collection of 44 brief biographies of famous and infamous figures in criminal justice history brings to life the people who have made the field of criminal justice what it is today. The criminal justice system is composed of more than laws and policies--it is composed of people. The system is only as good or ethical as the people who work in it. These brief (3 to 8 page) biographies include Allan Pinkerton, Herman Goldstein, Joseph Wambaugh, Wyatt Earp, Earl Warren, and Dorothea Dix. "Criminal Justice Pioneers in U.S. History" is divided into five major sections to provide variety and breadth of coverage: (1) academics/theorists, (2) law enforcement pioneers, (3) court/legal pioneers, (4) correctional pioneers, and (5) juvenile justice pioneers.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Punishment in Popular Culture

Author: Austin Sarat

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479864218

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 7425

The way a society punishes demonstrates its commitment to standards of judgment and justice, its distinctive views of blame and responsibility, and its particular way of responding to evil. Punishment in Popular Culture examines the cultural presuppositions that undergird America’s distinctive approach to punishment and analyzes punishment as a set of images, a spectacle of condemnation. It recognizes that the semiotics of punishment is all around us, not just in the architecture of the prison, or the speech made by a judge as she sends someone to the penal colony, but in both “high” and “popular” culture iconography, in novels, television, and film. This book brings together distinguished scholars of punishment and experts in media studies in an unusual juxtaposition of disciplines and perspectives. Americans continue to lock up more people for longer periods of time than most other nations, to use the death penalty, and to racialize punishment in remarkable ways. How are these facts of American penal life reflected in the portraits of punishment that Americans regularly encounter on television and in film? What are the conventions of genre which help to familiarize those portraits and connect them to broader political and cultural themes? Do television and film help to undermine punishment's moral claims? And how are developments in the boarder political economy reflected in the ways punishment appears in mass culture? Finally, how are images of punishment received by their audiences? It is to these questions that Punishment in Popular Culture is addressed.
Posted in Law

Unfair

The New Science of Criminal Injustice

Author: Adam Benforado

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0770437761

Category: LAW

Page: 379

View: 6338

"A crusading legal scholar exposes the powerful psychological forces that undermine our criminal justice system--and affect us all Our nation is founded on the notion that the law is impartial, that legal cases are won or lost on the basis of evidence, careful reasoning and nuanced argument. But they may, in fact, turn on the temperature of the courtroom, the camera angle of a defendant's taped confession, or a simple word choice or gesture during a cross-examination. In Unfair, law professor Adam Benforado shines a light on this troubling new research, showing, for example, that people with certain facial features receive longer sentences and that judges are far more likely to grant parole first thing in the morning. In fact, over the last two decades, psychologists and neuroscientists have uncovered many cognitive forces that operate beyond our conscious awareness--and Benforado argues that until we address these hidden biases head-on, the social inequality we see now will only widen, as powerful players and institutions find ways to exploit the weaknesses in our legal system. Weaving together historical examples, scientific studies, and compelling court cases--from the border collie put on trial in Kentucky to the five teenagers who falsely confessed in the Central Park Jogger case--Benforado shows how our judicial processes fail to uphold our values and protect society's weakest members, convicting the innocent while letting dangerous criminals go free. With clarity and passion, he lays out the scope of the problem and proposes a wealth of reforms that could prevent injustice and help us achieve true fairness and equality before the law"--
Posted in LAW