Policing Immigrants

Local Law Enforcement on the Front Lines

Author: Doris Marie Provine,Monica W. Varsanyi,Paul G. Lewis,Scott H. Decker

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022636321X

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 8398

The United States deported nearly two million illegal immigrants during the first five years of the Obama presidency—more than during any previous administration. President Obama stands accused by activists of being “deporter in chief.” Yet despite efforts to rebuild what many see as a broken system, the president has not yet been able to convince Congress to pass new immigration legislation, and his record remains rooted in a political landscape that was created long before his election. Deportation numbers have actually been on the rise since 1996, when two federal statutes sought to delegate a portion of the responsibilities for immigration enforcement to local authorities. Policing Immigrants traces the transition of immigration enforcement from a traditionally federal power exercised primarily near the US borders to a patchwork system of local policing that extends throughout the country’s interior. Since federal authorities set local law enforcement to the task of bringing suspected illegal immigrants to the federal government’s attention, local responses have varied. While some localities have resisted the work, others have aggressively sought out unauthorized immigrants, often seeking to further their own objectives by putting their own stamp on immigration policing. Tellingly, how a community responds can best be predicted not by conditions like crime rates or the state of the local economy but rather by the level of conservatism among local voters. What has resulted, the authors argue, is a system that is neither just nor effective—one that threatens the core crime-fighting mission of policing by promoting racial profiling, creating fear in immigrant communities, and undermining the critical community-based function of local policing.
Posted in Political Science

Working Law

Courts, Corporations, and Symbolic Civil Rights

Author: Lauren B. Edelman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022640093X

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 6771

Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, virtually all companies have antidiscrimination policies in place. Although these policies represent some progress, women and minorities remain underrepresented within the workplace as a whole and even more so when you look at high-level positions. They also tend to be less well paid. How is it that discrimination remains so prevalent in the American workplace despite the widespread adoption of policies designed to prevent it? One reason for the limited success of antidiscrimination policies, argues Lauren B. Edelman, is that the law regulating companies is broad and ambiguous, and managers therefore play a critical role in shaping what it means in daily practice. Often, what results are policies and procedures that are largely symbolic and fail to dispel long-standing patterns of discrimination. Even more troubling, these meanings of the law that evolve within companies tend to eventually make their way back into the legal domain, inconspicuously influencing lawyers for both plaintiffs and defendants and even judges. When courts look to the presence of antidiscrimination policies and personnel manuals to infer fair practices and to the presence of diversity training programs without examining whether these policies are effective in combating discrimination and achieving racial and gender diversity, they wind up condoning practices that deviate considerably from the legal ideals.
Posted in Social Science

The Sit-Ins

Protest and Legal Change in the Civil Rights Era

Author: Christopher W. Schmidt

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022652258X

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 5242

On February 1, 1960, four African American college students entered the Woolworth department store in Greensboro, North Carolina, and sat down at the lunch counter. This lunch counter, like most in the American South, refused to serve black customers. The four students remained in their seats until the store closed. In the following days, they returned, joined by growing numbers of fellow students. These “sit-in” demonstrations soon spread to other southern cities, drawing in thousands of students and coalescing into a protest movement that would transform the struggle for racial equality. The Sit-Ins tells the story of the student lunch counter protests and the national debate they sparked over the meaning of the constitutional right of all Americans to equal protection of the law. Christopher W. Schmidt describes how behind the now-iconic scenes of African American college students sitting in quiet defiance at “whites only” lunch counters lies a series of underappreciated legal dilemmas—about the meaning of the Constitution, the capacity of legal institutions to remedy different forms of injustice, and the relationship between legal reform and social change. The students’ actions initiated a national conversation over whether the Constitution’s equal protection clause extended to the activities of private businesses that served the general public. The courts, the traditional focal point for accounts of constitutional disputes, played an important but ultimately secondary role in this story. The great victory of the sit-in movement came not in the Supreme Court, but in Congress, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, landmark legislation that recognized the right African American students had claimed for themselves four years earlier. The Sit-Ins invites a broader understanding of how Americans contest and construct the meaning of their Constitution.
Posted in Law

Building the Prison State

Race and the Politics of Mass Incarceration

Author: Heather Schoenfeld

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022652115X

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 4558

The United States incarcerates more people per capita than any other industrialized nation in the world—about 1 in 100 adults, or more than 2 million people—while national spending on prisons has catapulted 400 percent. Given the vast racial disparities in incarceration, the prison system also reinforces race and class divisions. How and why did we become the world’s leading jailer? And what can we, as a society, do about it? Reframing the story of mass incarceration, Heather Schoenfeld illustrates how the unfinished task of full equality for African Americans led to a series of policy choices that expanded the government’s power to punish, even as they were designed to protect individuals from arbitrary state violence. Examining civil rights protests, prison condition lawsuits, sentencing reforms, the War on Drugs, and the rise of conservative Tea Party politics, Schoenfeld explains why politicians veered from skepticism of prisons to an embrace of incarceration as the appropriate response to crime. To reduce the number of people behind bars, Schoenfeld argues that we must transform the political incentives for imprisonment and develop a new ideological basis for punishment.
Posted in Law

Islands of Sovereignty

Haitian Migration and the Borders of Empire

Author: Jeffrey S. Kahn

Publisher: Chicago Series in Law and Soci

ISBN: 022658741X

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5576

Introduction -- The political and the economic -- Border laboratories -- Contagion and the sovereign body -- Screening's architecture -- The jurisdictional imagination -- Interdiction adrift
Posted in History

Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 364110498X

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 2894

Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.
Posted in History

Society Today [1]

Based on a Series from New Society

Author: Michael Williams

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: 254

View: 2182

Posted in Great Britain

Die Verdammten dieser Erde

Author: Frantz Fanon,Jean-Paul Sartre

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783518371688

Category: Afrika - Entkolonialisierung

Page: 266

View: 1583

Posted in Afrika - Entkolonialisierung

Zwischen mir und der Welt

Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates

Publisher: Hanser Berlin

ISBN: 3446251952

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 7955

Wenn in den USA schwarze Teenager von Polizisten ermordet werden, ist das nur ein Problem von individueller Verfehlung? Nein, denn rassistische Gewalt ist fest eingewebt in die amerikanische Identität – sie ist das, worauf das Land gebaut ist. Afroamerikaner besorgten als Sklaven seinen Reichtum und sterben als freie Bürger auf seinen Straßen. In seinem schmerzhaften, leidenschaftlichen Manifest verdichtet Ta-Nehisi Coates amerikanische und persönliche Geschichte zu einem Appell an sein Land, sich endlich seiner Vergangenheit zu stellen. Sein Buch wurde in den USA zum Nr.-1-Bestseller und ist schon jetzt ein Klassiker, auf den sich zukünftig alle Debatten um Rassismus beziehen werden.
Posted in Political Science

Hillbilly-Elegie

Die Geschichte meiner Familie und einer Gesellschaft in der Krise

Author: J. D. Vance

Publisher: Ullstein Buchverlage

ISBN: 3843715777

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 5779

Seine Großeltern versuchten, mit Fleiß und Mobilität der Armut zu entkommen und sich in der Mitte der Gesellschaft zu etablieren. Doch letztlich war alles vergeblich. J. D. Vance erzählt die Geschichte seiner Familie — eine Geschichte vom Scheitern und von der Resignation einer ganzen Bevölkerungsschicht. Armut und Chaos, Hilflosigkeit und Gewalt, Drogen und Alkohol: Genau in diesem Teufelskreis befinden sich viele weiße Arbeiterfamilien in den USA — entfremdet von der politischen Führung, abgehängt vom Rest der Gesellschaft, anfällig für populistische Parolen. Früher konnten sich die »Hillbillys«, die weißen Fabrikarbeiter, erhoffen, sich zu Wohlstand zu schuften. Doch spätestens gegen Ende des 20sten Jahrhunderts zog der Niedergang der alten Industrien ihre Familien in eine Abwärtsspirale, in der sie bis heute stecken. Vance gelingt es wie keinem anderen, diese ausweglose Situation und die Krise einer ganzen Gesellschaft eindrücklich zu schildern. Sein Buch bewegte Millionen von Lesern in den USA und erklärt nicht zuletzt den Wahltriumph eines Donald Trump.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Dollars & Sense

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 4498

Posted in United States

Unsere gemeinsame Zukunft

Bericht der Weltkommission für Umwelt und Entwicklung

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 348

View: 6681

Posted in

Broadcasting

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Radio broadcasting

Page: N.A

View: 9985

Posted in Radio broadcasting

Mother Jones

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Socialism

Page: N.A

View: 2811

Posted in Socialism

Das Guantanamo-Tagebuch unzensiert

Author: Mohamedou Ould Slahi

Publisher: Tropen

ISBN: 3608110488

Category: Political Science

Page: 488

View: 6458

Der Spiegel-Bestseller – jetzt unzensiert Todesdrohung, Gewaltanwendung, sexueller Missbrauch: Mohamedou Slahis Geständnis wurde unter Folter erpresst. Er galt jahrelang als einer der Hauptverdächtigen der Anschläge vom 11. September. Doch obwohl ein Gericht bereits 2010 seine Freilassung angeordnet hatte, blieb er bis zum Oktober 2016 inhaftiert. Sein ergreifender Bericht ist die bisher einzige bekannte Chronik eines Guantanamo-Gefangenen, die in der Haft verfasst wurde. Ein schockierend authentischer Bericht, der erstmals in der von US-Behörden unzensierten Fassung vorliegt. Slahis Gefangenschaft dokumentiert fast ein ganzes Jahrzehnt des amerikanischen »Kriegs gegen den Terror«. Donald Rumsfeld – mit der Akte »Slahi« vertraut – autorisierte die Behörden, den mutmaßlichen Al-Qaida- Verschwörer intensiven Verhören zu unterziehen – und nahm dabei auch Folterungen in Kauf. Im Jahr 2005 begann Slahi, seine Geschichte niederzuschreiben, doch erst zehn Jahre später konnten seine Anwälte eine Veröffentlichung seiner Aufzeichnungen in zensierter Form erwirken. Nach seiner Freilassung 2016 füllte Slahi die geschwärzten Stellen seines emotionalen, stets um Fairness bemühten Berichts über Entführungen und Folter durch Geheimdienste und Militärs und verleiht so seinen Mitgefangenen und Peinigern ein glaubwürdiges Profil, das von Machtmissbrauch und Menschlichkeit erzählt.
Posted in Political Science

The Writers directory 2005

Author: Miranda H. Ferrara

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781558625280

Category: Authors, American

Page: 2164

View: 4159

Posted in Authors, American

World Capitalist Crisis & the Rise of the Right

Author: Marlene Dixon,Tony Platt,Susanne Jonas

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 151

View: 2672

Posted in Political Science

The New Jim Crow

Masseninhaftierung und Rassismus in den USA

Author: Michelle Alexander

Publisher: Antje Kunstmann

ISBN: 3956141598

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 2306

Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.
Posted in Political Science

Contemporary Marxism

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Communism

Page: N.A

View: 3379

Posted in Communism

Resources in Education

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 3736

Posted in Education