Personal Memoirs of a Residence of Thirty Years with the Indian Tribes on the American Frontiers

With Brief Notices of Passing Events, Facts, and Opinions, A.D. 1812 to A.D. 1842

Author: Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 703

View: 1086

This is the autobiographical account of an explorer, government administrator, and scholar whose researches into the language and customs of the Chippewa and other Native American peoples of the Great Lakes region are considered milestones in nineteenth-century ethnography. After a childhood in Hamilton, New York, Schoolcraft gained attention for the reports and journals he wrote on trips west to explore mineral deposits in Arkansas, Missouri, and the old Northwest. Later, he joined the Cass expedition to the Lake Superior region, where he served as an Indian agent in St. Mary (Sault Ste. Marie) from 1822 to 1836. During that time, he continued to make regular exploratory journeys. On one of these, in 1832, he located the Mississippi River's source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota. From 1836 to 1841, Schoolcraft served as Michigan's superintendent of Indian Affairs and helped to bring about a treaty with the Ojibwa (1836), who as a result relinquished their claims to most of northern Michigan. Schoolcraft's memoirs are noteworthy for their detailed geographic, geological, political, military, folkloric, historical, and ethnographic information. Married to a woman of Native American background, he was sympathetic to certain aspects of the Indian societies he encountered. Nevertheless, he saw the sweep of new settlers into Indian lands as inevitable, and accepted as necessary the removal of Native peoples beyond the advancing boundaries of the United States. Schoolcraft believed that soldiers, diplomats, federal officials, and missionaries could do their jobs more effectively if they learned native languages and understood Indian customs. These motives, along with his literary aspirations, gave rise to his explorations of Indian cultural life. He discusses Indian myths and legends at length and talks about how he transformed them into his own Algic Researches (1839), the work that inspired Longfellow's "Hiawatha." Schoolcraft also corresponded or visited with Washington Irving, Thomas Jefferson, Albert Gallatin, and many of the era's other leading intellectuals, and details his conversations with them.
Posted in Indians of North America

Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers

Author: Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing

ISBN: 9781419140952

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 676

View: 8469

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Hoe and the Horse on the Plains

A Study of Cultural Development Among North American Indians

Author: Preston Holder

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803258099

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 2210

Posted in History

Writing Indian Nations

Native Intellectuals and the Politics of Historiography, 1827-1863

Author: Maureen Konkle

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875902

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 8839

In the early years of the republic, the United States government negotiated with Indian nations because it could not afford protracted wars politically, militarily, or economically. Maureen Konkle argues that by depending on treaties, which rest on the equal standing of all signatories, Europeans in North America institutionalized a paradox: the very documents through which they sought to dispossess Native peoples in fact conceded Native autonomy. As the United States used coerced treaties to remove Native peoples from their lands, a group of Cherokee, Pequot, Ojibwe, Tuscarora, and Seneca writers spoke out. With history, polemic, and personal narrative these writers countered widespread misrepresentations about Native peoples' supposedly primitive nature, their inherent inability to form governments, and their impending disappearance. Furthermore, they contended that arguments about racial difference merely justified oppression and dispossession; deriding these arguments as willful attempts to evade the true meanings and implications of the treaties, the writers insisted on recognition of Native peoples' political autonomy and human equality. Konkle demonstrates that these struggles over the meaning of U.S.-Native treaties in the early nineteenth century led to the emergence of the first substantial body of Native writing in English and, as she shows, the effects of the struggle over the political status of Native peoples remain embedded in contemporary scholarship.
Posted in Social Science

Indian Country

Essays on Contemporary Native Culture

Author: Gail Guthrie Valaskakis

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1554588103

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 8377

Since first contact, Natives and newcomers have been involved in an increasingly complex struggle over power and identity. Modern “Indian wars” are fought over land and treaty rights, artistic appropriation, and academic analysis, while Native communities struggle among themselves over membership, money, and cultural meaning. In cultural and political arenas across North America, Natives enact and newcomers protest issues of traditionalism, sovereignty, and self-determination. In these struggles over domination and resistance, over different ideologies and Indian identities, neither Natives nor other North Americans recognize the significance of being rooted together in history and culture, or how representations of “Indianness” set them in opposition to each other. In Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture, Gail Guthrie Valaskakis uses a cultural studies approach to offer a unique perspective on Native political struggle and cultural conflict in both Canada and the United States. She reflects on treaty rights and traditionalism, media warriors, Indian princesses, powwow, museums, art, and nationhood. According to Valaskakis, Native and non-Native people construct both who they are and their relations with each other in narratives that circulate through art, anthropological method, cultural appropriation, and Native reappropriation. For Native peoples and Others, untangling the past—personal, political, and cultural—can help to make sense of current struggles over power and identity that define the Native experience today. Grounded in theory and threaded with Native voices and evocative descriptions of “Indian” experience (including the author’s), the essays interweave historical and political process, personal narrative, and cultural critique. This book is an important contribution to Native studies that will appeal to anyone interested in First Nations’ experience and popular culture.
Posted in Social Science

In this Remote Country

French Colonial Culture in the Anglo-American Imagination, 1780-1860

Author: Edward Watts

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807830461

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 275

View: 4032

When Anglo-Americans looked west after the Revolution, they hoped to see a blank slate upon which to build their continental republic. However, French settlers had inhabited the territory stretching from Ohio to Oregon for over a century, blending into Na
Posted in Literary Criticism

Living with Animals

Ojibwe Spirit Powers

Author: Michael Pomedli

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442667052

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 9217

Within nineteenth-century Ojibwe/Chippewa medicine societies, and in communities at large, animals are realities and symbols that demonstrate cultural principles of North American Ojibwe nations. Living with Animals presents over 100 images from oral and written sources – including birch bark scrolls, rock art, stories, games, and dreams – in which animals appear as kindred beings, spirit powers, healers, and protectors. Michael Pomedli shows that the principles at play in these sources are not merely evidence of cultural values, but also unique standards brought to treaty signings by Ojibwe leaders. In addition, these principles are norms against which North American treaty interpretations should be reframed. The author provides an important foundation for ongoing treaty negotiations, and for what contemporary Ojibwe cultural figures corroborate as ways of leading a good, integrated life.
Posted in Social Science

Robidoux Chronicles

French-Indian Ethnoculture of the Trans-Mississippi West

Author: Hugh M. Lewis

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1412222990

Category: History

Page: 450

View: 7214

Robidoux Chronicles treats with comprehensive documentary detail the factual history of the Robidoux lineage in North America from the first progenitor who arrived in Quebec in about 1665, through the famous six brothers who distinguished themselves as Mountain Men, up until even recent times on reservations in the US. Many members of the Robidoux family were intimately connected to the entire history of the North American fur trade. The six brothers, born in St. Louis before the coming of Lewis & Clark, were important fur-traders during the classical Rendezvous era of the North American fur trade. They became key players in the organization & articulation of the Overland Trail, only to die soon afterward in relative obscurity upon the plains of Kansas & Nebraska. By the 1950's, the story of the Robidoux had been almost entirely forgotten. Subsequent historians had lost all but a scant & fragmentary knowledge of the true role & exploits of the Robidoux & their French-Indian compatriots upon the frontiers of the old west. Antoine Robidoux was the first to establish permanent trading settlements west of the Rockies in the Inter-Montane corridor, & his brother Michel was one of the first expeditions to traverse the length of the Grand Canyon. The eldest brother Joseph became one of the earliest established traders on the upper Missouri & founded St. Joseph, Missouri, which was later to be the primary starting point of the Overland Trail. His younger brother Louis became one of the earliest ranch owners in California, becoming Don of the Jurupa, that encompassed the areas known today as Riverside, San Bernardino, San Jacinto & San Timoteo. An entire inter-tribal French-Indian ethnocultural orientation had developed upon the plains, prairies & mountains of the Trans-Mississippi west a good fifty years before the coming of the Iron Horse & the Pony Express, & has been carried on today in proximity to the reservations of Kansas & Oklahoma, South Dakota & Wyoming.
Posted in History

Languages and Publics

The Making of Authority

Author: Susan Gal,Kathryn Woolard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317639790

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 8

View: 5350

The essays in this collection examine the public construction of languages, the linguistic construction of publics, and the relationship between these two processes. Cultural categories such as named languages, linguistic standards and genres are the products of expert knowledge as well as of linguistic ideologies more widely shared among speakers. Translation, grammars and dictionaries, the policing of correctness, folklore collections and linguistic academies are all part of the work that produces not only languages but also social groups and spheres of action such as "the public". Such representational processes are the topic of inquiry in this voume. They are explored as crucial aspects of power, figuring among the means for establishing inequality, imposing social hierarchy, and mobilizing political action. Contributions to this volume investigate two related questions: first, how different images of linguistic phenomena gain social credibility and political influence; and, secondly, the role of linguistic ideology and practices in the making of political authority. Using both historical and ethnographic approaches, they examine empirical cases ranging from small-scale societies to multi-ethnic empire, from nineteenth-century linguistic theories to contemporary mass media, and from Europe to Oceania to the Americas. Contributors include Susan Gal, Kathryn Woolard, Judith Irvine, Richard Bauman, Michael Silverstein, Jane Hill, Joseph Errington, Bambi Schieffelin, Jacqueline Urla and Ben Lee.
Posted in Language Arts & Disciplines

Native Tongues

Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation

Author: Sean P. Harvey

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674745388

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 5420

Exploring the morally entangled territory of language and race in 18th- and 19th-century America, Sean Harvey shows that whites’ theories of an “Indian mind” inexorably shaped by Indian languages played a crucial role in the subjugation of Native peoples and informed the U.S. government’s efforts to extinguish Native languages for years to come.
Posted in History

Museum Studies

An Anthology of Contexts

Author: Bettina Messias Carbonell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405173815

Category: Art

Page: 655

View: 8717

Retaining the multidisciplinary focus of the critically acclaimed first edition, the new edition of "Museum Studies: An Anthology of Contexts" presents a comprehensive collection of approaches to museums and their relation to history, culture, and philosophy. Striking a careful balance between contemporary analysis and historical documentation, the new edition features primary and secondary texts spanning the course of some two hundred years of museum history that reveal a wealth of insights into culture and society. Among the developments in twenty-first-century museum scholarship featured in this new edition are issues of inclusion and exclusion, repatriation, indigenous models of collection and display, museums in an age of globalization, visitor studies, and interactive technologies. A new section on relationships, interactions, and responsibilities focuses on the intersection of memory, history, ethics, and affect within the museum and beyond its walls. With its expansive nature and multidisciplinary approach, "Museum Studies" solidifies its reputation as the primary resource for this important academic discipline.
Posted in Art

Names

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 790

Posted in Law

Michigan History

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Michigan

Page: N.A

View: 1454

Posted in Michigan

Standard encyclopedia

a summary of universal knowledge, with pronunciation of every subject title, for teachers, pupils and families ...

Author: Leo de Colange

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries, American

Page: 991

View: 1446

Posted in Encyclopedias and dictionaries, American

The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography

Being the History of the United States, as Illustrated in the Lives of the Founders, Builders, and Defenders of the Republic, and of the Men and Women who are Doing the Work and Moulding the Thought of the Present Time

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 6364

Posted in United States

Der sang von Hiawatha

Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 196

View: 8922

Posted in Indians of North America

Twentieth Century Encyclopædia

A Library of Universal Knowledge ...

Author: Charles Morris

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Page: N.A

View: 8100

Posted in Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Daniel Boone

An American Life

Author: Michael Lofaro

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813122786

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 216

View: 8595

" The embodiment of the American hero, the man of action, the pathfinder, Daniel Boone represents the great adventure of his age—the westward movement of the American people. Daniel Boone: An American Life brings together over thirty years of research in an extraordinary biography of the quintessential pioneer. Based on primary sources, the book depicts Boone through the eyes of those who knew him and within the historical contexts of his eighty-six years. The story of Daniel Boone offers new insights into the turbulent birth and growth of the nation and demonstrates why the frontier forms such a significant part of the American experience.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography