Once Within Borders

Author: Charles S. Maier

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674973917

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 8628

At a time when the technologies of globalization are eroding barriers to communication, transportation, and trade, Charles Maier explores the fitful evolution of territories—politically bounded regions whose borders define the jurisdiction of laws and the movement of peoples—as a worldwide practice of human societies.
Posted in History

Once Within Borders

Author: Charles S. Maier

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674059788

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 2468

At a time when the technologies of globalization are eroding barriers to communication, transportation, and trade, Charles Maier explores the fitful evolution of territories—politically bounded regions whose borders define the jurisdiction of laws and the movement of peoples—as a worldwide practice of human societies.
Posted in History

Among Empires

Author: Charles S MAIER

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674040457

Category: History

Page: 383

View: 9715

This elegantly written book examines the structure and impact of empires and asks whether the United States shares their traits and behavior. Charles S. Maier outlines the essentials of empire throughout history, then explores the exercise of U.S. power in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. With learning, dispassion, and clarity, Among Empires offers bold comparisons and an original account of American power.
Posted in History

Mapping an Empire

The Geographical Construction of British India, 1765-1843

Author: Matthew H. Edney

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226184862

Category: Reference

Page: 480

View: 1417

In this fascinating history of the British surveys of India, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain used modern survey techniques to not only create and define the spatial image of its Empire, but also to legitimate its colonialist activities. "There is much to be praised in this book. It is an excellent history of how India came to be painted red in the nineteenth century. But more importantly, Mapping an Empire sets a new standard for books that examine a fundamental problem in the history of European imperialism."—D. Graham Burnett, Times Literary Supplement "Mapping an Empire is undoubtedly a major contribution to the rapidly growing literature on science and empire, and a work which deserves to stimulate a great deal of fresh thinking and informed research."—David Arnold, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History "This case study offers broadly applicable insights into the relationship between ideology, technology and politics. . . . Carefully read, this is a tale of irony about wishful thinking and the limits of knowledge."—Publishers Weekly
Posted in Reference

The Cartographic State

Maps, Territory, and the Origins of Sovereignty

Author: Jordan Branch

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107040965

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 2057

Describes the emergence of the territorial state and examines the role that cartography has played in shaping its linear boundaries.
Posted in History

The Politics of Borders

Sovereignty, Security, and the Citizen after 9/11

Author: Matthew Longo

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316774287

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 5516

Borders sit at the center of global politics. Yet they are too often understood as thin lines, as they appear on maps, rather than as political institutions in their own right. This book takes a detailed look at the evolution of border security in the United States after 9/11. Far from the walls and fences that dominate the news, it reveals borders to be thick, multi-faceted and binational institutions that have evolved greatly in recent decades. The book contributes to debates within political science on sovereignty, citizenship, cosmopolitanism, human rights and global justice. In particular, the new politics of borders reveal a sovereignty that is not waning, but changing, expanding beyond the state carapace and engaging certain logics of empire.
Posted in Political Science

How Population Change Will Transform Our World

Author: Sarah Harper

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019108669X

Category: Medical

Page: 160

View: 2784

Predicting the shape of our future populations is vital for installing the infrastructure, welfare, and provisions necessary for society to survive. There are many opportunities and challenges that will come with the changes in our populations over the 21st century. In this new addition to the 21st Century Challenges series, Sarah Harper works to dispel myths such as the fear of unstoppable global growth resulting in a population explosion, or that climate change will lead to the mass movement of environmental refugees; and instead considers the future shape of our populations in light of demographic trends in fertility, mortality, and migration, and their national and global impact. How Population Change Will Transform Our World looks at population trends by region to highlight the key issues facing us in the coming decades, including the demographic inertia in Europe, demographic dividend in Asia, high fertility and mortality in Africa, the youth bulge in the Middle East, and the balancing act of migration in the Americas. Harper concludes with an analysis of global challenges we must plan for such as the impact of climate change and urbanization, and the difficulty of feeding 10 billion people, and considers ways in which we can prepare for, and mitigate against, these challenges.
Posted in Medical

A Political Theory of Territory

Author: Margaret Moore

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190222247

Category: Philosophy

Page: 263

View: 9382

This title offers a political self-determination theory of territory. Territorial disputes are at the centre of some of the most intractable controversies facing us today but it is also one of the most under-theorised concepts that we rely on. Most work in political philosophy, international relations, political science, and law take for granted the territorial imperative (that we need states, and states are necessarily territorial); yet, this book argues, territory itself requires a defence.
Posted in Philosophy

Does Conquest Pay?

The Exploitation of Occupied Industrial Societies

Author: Peter Liberman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691002428

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 7980

Can foreign invaders successfully exploit industrial economies? DOES CONQUEST PAY? demonstrates that expansion can, in fact, provide rewards to aggressor nations and suggests that the international system is more war-prone than many optimists claim.
Posted in Political Science

A World in Disarray

American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order

Author: Richard Haass

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399562370

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 4888

"A valuable primer on foreign policy: a primer that concerned citizens of all political persuasions—not to mention the president and his advisers—could benefit from reading." —The New York Times An examination of a world increasingly defined by disorder and a United States unable to shape the world in its image, from the president of the Council on Foreign Relations Things fall apart; the center cannot hold. The rules, policies, and institutions that have guided the world since World War II have largely run their course. Respect for sovereignty alone cannot uphold order in an age defined by global challenges from terrorism and the spread of nuclear weapons to climate change and cyberspace. Meanwhile, great power rivalry is returning. Weak states pose problems just as confounding as strong ones. The United States remains the world’s strongest country, but American foreign policy has at times made matters worse, both by what the U.S. has done and by what it has failed to do. The Middle East is in chaos, Asia is threatened by China’s rise and a reckless North Korea, and Europe, for decades the world’s most stable region, is now anything but. As Richard Haass explains, the election of Donald Trump and the unexpected vote for “Brexit” signals that many in modern democracies reject important aspects of globalization, including borders open to trade and immigrants. In A World in Disarray, Haass argues for an updated global operating system—call it world order 2.0—that reflects the reality that power is widely distributed and that borders count for less. One critical element of this adjustment will be adopting a new approach to sovereignty, one that embraces its obligations and responsibilities as well as its rights and protections. Haass also details how the U.S. should act towards China and Russia, as well as in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. He suggests, too, what the country should do to address its dysfunctional politics, mounting debt, and the lack of agreement on the nature of its relationship with the world. A World in Disarray is a wise examination, one rich in history, of the current world, along with how we got here and what needs doing. Haass shows that the world cannot have stability or prosperity without the United States, but that the United States cannot be a force for global stability and prosperity without its politicians and citizens reaching a new understanding.
Posted in Political Science

Why Walls Won't Work

Repairing the US-Mexico Divide

Author: Michael Dear

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199323909

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 7900

When thinking about the border separating the United States from Mexico, what typically comes to mind is an unwelcoming zone with violent, poverty-ridden towns, cities, and maquiladoras on one side and an increasingly militarized network of barriers and surveillance systems on the other. It was not always this way. In fact, from the end of Mexican-American War until the late twentieth century, the border was a very porous and loosely regulated region. In this sweeping account of life within the United States-Mexican border zone, acclaimed urbanist and geographer Michael Dear traces the border's long history of cultural interaction, from exchanges between the region's numerous Mesoamerican tribes onwards. Once Mexican and American settlers met at the Rio Grande and the southwest in the nineteenth century, new forms of interaction evolved. But as Dear warns in his bracing study, this vibrant zone of cultural and social amalgamation is in danger of fading away because of highly restrictive American policies and the violence along Mexico's side of the border. As he explains through analyses of the U.S. border security complex and the emerging Mexican narco-state, the very existence of the "third nation" occupied by both Americans and Mexicans is under serious threat. But through a series of evocative portraits of contemporary border communities, he shows that the potential for revitalizing this in-between nation still remains. Combining a broad historical perspective and a commanding overview of present-day problems, Why Walls Won't Work represents a major intellectual foray into one of the most hotly contested political issues of our era.
Posted in Social Science

A Search for Sovereignty

Law and Geography in European Empires, 1400–1900

Author: Lauren Benton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107782716

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7065

A Search for Sovereignty approaches world history by examining the relation of law and geography in European empires between 1400 and 1900. Lauren Benton argues that Europeans imagined imperial space as networks of corridors and enclaves, and that they constructed sovereignty in ways that merged ideas about geography and law. Conflicts over treason, piracy, convict transportation, martial law, and crime created irregular spaces of law, while also attaching legal meanings to familiar geographic categories such as rivers, oceans, islands, and mountains. The resulting legal and spatial anomalies influenced debates about imperial constitutions and international law both in the colonies and at home. This study changes our understanding of empire and its legacies and opens new perspectives on the global history of law.
Posted in History

The Land Between the Lakes

A Geography of the Forgotten Future

Author: Ronald A. Foresta

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 1572338636

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1863

"This is the first full-scale look at LBL, which has been managed by the TVA since its beginning. In part environmental history, this book focuses on public policy issues and the successes and failures of New Deal and then Great Society programs and concentrates fairly intensively on public planning"--
Posted in History

The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship

Author: Ayelet Shachar,Rainer Bauboeck,Irene Bloemraad,Maarten Vink

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192528424

Category: History

Page: 816

View: 9046

Contrary to predictions that it would become increasingly redundant in a globalizing world, citizenship is back with a vengeance. The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship brings together leading experts in law, philosophy, political science, economics, sociology, and geography to provide a multidisciplinary, comparative discussion of different dimensions of citizenship: as legal status and political membership; as rights and obligations; as identity and belonging; as civic virtues and practices of engagement; and as a discourse of political and social equality or responsibility for a common good. The contributors engage with some of the oldest normative and substantive quandaries in the literature, dilemmas that have renewed salience in today's political climate. As well as setting an agenda for future theoretical and empirical explorations, this Handbook explores the state of citizenship today in an accessible and engaging manner that will appeal to a wide academic and non-academic audience. Chapters highlight variations in citizenship regimes practiced in different countries, from immigrant states to 'non-western' contexts, from settler societies to newly independent states, attentive to both migrants and those who never cross an international border. Topics include the 'selling' of citizenship, multilevel citizenship, in-between statuses, citizenship laws, post-colonial citizenship, the impact of technological change on citizenship, and other cutting-edge issues. This Handbook is the major reference work for those engaged with citizenship from a legal, political, and cultural perspective. Written by the most knowledgeable senior and emerging scholars in their fields, this comprehensive volume offers state-of-the-art analyses of the main challenges and prospects of citizenship in today's world of increased migration and globalization. Special emphasis is put on the question of whether inclusive and egalitarian citizenship can provide political legitimacy in a turbulent world of exploding social inequality and resurgent populism.
Posted in History

In Space We Read Time

On the History of Civilization and Geopolitics

Author: Karl Schlögel

Publisher: Bard Graduate Center Cultural

ISBN: 9781941792087

Category: Art

Page: 550

View: 6151

History is usually thought of as a tale of time, a string of events flowing in a particular chronological order. But as Karl Schlögel shows in this groundbreaking book, the where of history is just as important as the when. Schlögel relishes space the way a writer relishes a good story: on a quest for a type of history that takes full account of place, he explores everything from landscapes to cities, maps to railway timetables. Do you know the origin of the name "Everest"? What can the layout of towns tell us about the American Dream? In Space We Read Time reveals this and much, much more. Here is both a model for thinking about history within physical space and a stimulating history of thought about space, as Schlögel reads historical periods and events within the context of their geographical location. Discussions range from the history of geography in France to what a town directory from 1930s Berlin can say about professional trades that have since disappeared. He takes a special interest in maps, which can serve many purposes--one poignant example being the German Jewish community's 1938 atlas of emigration, which showed the few remaining possibilities for escape. Other topics include Thomas Jefferson's map of the United States; the British survey of India; and the multiple cartographers with Woodrow Wilson at the Paris Peace Conference, where the aim was to redraw Europe's boundaries on the basis of ethnicity. Moving deftly from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to 9/11 and from Vermeer's paintings to the fall of the Berlin Wall, this intriguing book presents history from a completely new perspective.
Posted in Art

A History of the Peoples of Siberia

Russia's North Asian Colony 1581-1990

Author: James Forsyth

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521477710

Category: History

Page: 455

View: 767

This is the first ethnohistory of Siberia to appear in English, tracing the history of the native peoples from the Russian conquest onwards. James Forsyth compares the Siberian experience with that of the Indians and Eskimos in North America and the book as a whole will provide readers with a vast corpus of ethnographic information previously inaccessible to Western scholars.
Posted in History

Cheap Threats

Why the United States Struggles to Coerce Weak States

Author: Dianne Pfundstein Chamberlain

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 1626162832

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 9206

Why do weak states resist threats of force from the United States, especially when history shows that this superpower carries out its ultimatums? Cheap Threats upends conventional notions of power politics and challenges assumptions about the use of compellent military threats in international politics. Drawing on an original dataset of US compellence from 1945 to 2007 and four in-depth case studies—the Cuban Missile Crisis, the 2011 confrontation with Libya, and the 1991 and 2003 showdowns with Iraq—Dianne Pfundstein Chamberlain finds that US compellent threats often fail because threatening and using force became comparatively “cheap” for the United States after the Cold War. Becoming the world’s only superpower and adopting a new light-footprint model of war, which relied heavily on airpower and now drones, have reduced the political, economic, and human costs that US policymakers face when they go to war. Paradoxically, this lower-cost model of war has cheapened US threats and fails to signal to opponents that the United States is resolved to bear the high costs of a protracted conflict. The result: small states gamble, often unwisely, that the United States will move on to a new target before achieving its goals. Cheap Threats resets the bar for scholars and planners grappling with questions of state resolve, hegemonic stability, effective coercion, and other issues pertinent in this new era of US warfighting and diplomacy.
Posted in Political Science

Soldiers of Empire

Author: Tarak Barkawi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107169585

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 2924

How are soldiers made? Why do they fight? Re-imagining the study of armed forces and society, Barkawi examines the imperial and multinational armies that fought in Asia in the Second World War, especially the British Indian army in the Burma campaign. Going beyond conventional narratives, Barkawi studies soldiers in transnational context, from recruitment and training to combat and memory. Drawing on history, sociology and anthropology, the book critiques the 'Western way of war' from a postcolonial perspective. Barkawi reconceives soldiers as cosmopolitan, their battles irreducible to the national histories that monopolise them. This book will appeal to those interested in the Second World War, armed forces and the British Empire, and students and scholars of military sociology and history, South Asian studies and international relations.
Posted in History

On the Medieval Origins of the Modern State

Author: Joseph R. Strayer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400828570

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 6848

The modern state, however we conceive of it today, is based on a pattern that emerged in Europe in the period from 1100 to 1600. Inspired by a lifetime of teaching and research, On the Medieval Origins of the Modern State is a classic work on what is known about the early history of the European state. This short, clear book book explores the European state in its infancy, especially in institutional developments in the administration of justice and finance. Forewords from Charles Tilly and William Chester Jordan demonstrate the perennial importance of Joseph Strayer's book, and situate it within a contemporary context. Tilly demonstrates how Strayer’s work has set the agenda for a whole generation of historical analysts, not only in medieval history but also in the comparative study of state formation. William Chester Jordan's foreword examines the scholarly and pedagogical setting within which Strayer produced his book, and how this both enhanced its accessibility and informed its focus on peculiarly English and French accomplishments in early state formation.
Posted in History

The Culture of Time and Space, 1880-1918

With a New Preface

Author: Stephen Kern

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674021693

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 1436

Stephen Kern writes about the sweeping changes in technology and culture between 1880 and World War I that created new modes of understanding and experiencing time and space. To mark the book's twentieth anniversary, Kern provides an illuminating new preface about the breakthrough in interpretive approach that has made this a seminal work in interdisciplinary studies.
Posted in History