Nonstop Metropolis

A New York City Atlas

Author: Rebecca Solnit,Joshua Jelly-Schapiro

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520285948

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 1872

Nonstop Metropolis, the culminating volume in a trilogy of atlases, conveys innumerable unbound experiences of New York City through twenty-six imaginative maps and informative essays. Bringing together the insights of dozens of experts—from linguists to music historians, ethnographers, urbanists, and environmental journalists—amplified by cartographers, artists, and photographers, it explores all five boroughs of New York City and parts of nearby New Jersey. We are invited to travel through Manhattan’s playgrounds, from polyglot Queens to many-faceted Brooklyn, and from the resilient Bronx to the mystical kung fu hip-hop mecca of Staten Island. The contributors to this exquisitely designed and gorgeously illustrated volume celebrate New York City’s unique vitality, its incubation of the avant-garde, and its literary history, but they also critique its racial and economic inequality, environmental impact, and erasure of its past. Nonstop Metropolis allows us to excavate New York’s buried layers, to scrutinize its political heft, and to discover the unexpected in one of the most iconic cities in the world. It is both a challenge and homage to how New Yorkers think of their city, and how the world sees this capital of capitalism, culture, immigration, and more. Contributors: Sheerly Avni, Gaiutra Bahadur, Marshall Berman, Joe Boyd, Will Butler, Garnette Cadogan, Thomas J. Campanella, Daniel Aldana Cohen, Teju Cole, Joel Dinerstein, Paul La Farge, Francisco Goldman, Margo Jefferson, Lucy R. Lippard, Barry Lopez, Valeria Luiselli, Suketu Mehta, Emily Raboteau, Molly Roy, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, Luc Sante, Heather Smith, Jonathan Tarleton, Astra Taylor, Alexandra T. Vazquez, Christina Zanfagna Interviews with: Valerie Capers, Peter Coyote, Grandmaster Caz, Grand Wizzard Theodore, Melle Mel, RZA
Posted in Social Science

Nonstop Metropolis

A New York City Atlas

Author: Rebecca Solnit,Joshua Jelly-Schapiro

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520285956

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 2078

"Nonstop Metropolis, the culminating volume in a trilogy of atlases, conveys innumerable unbound experiences of New York City through twenty-six imaginative maps and informative essays. Bringing together the insights of dozens of experts-from linguists to music historians, ethnographers, urbanists, and environmental journalists-amplified by cartographers, artists, and photographers, it explores all five boroughs of New York City and parts of nearby New Jersey. We are invited to travel through Manhattan's playgrounds, from polyglot Queens to many-faceted Brooklyn, and from the resilien Bronx to the mystical kung fu hip-hop mecca of Staten Island. The contributors to this exquisitely designed and gorgeously illustrated volume celebrate New York City's unique vitality, its incubation of the avant-garde, and its literary history, but they also critique its racial and economic inequality, environmental impact, and erasure of its past. Nonstop Metropolis allows us to excavate New York's buried layers, to scrutinize its political heft, and to discover the unexpected in one of the most iconic cities in the world. It is both a challenge and homage to how New Yorkers think of their city, and how the world sees this capital of capitalism, culture, immigration, and more." -- Publisher's description.
Posted in Social Science

Infinite City

A San Francisco Atlas

Author: Rebecca Solnit

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520262492

Category: History

Page: 156

View: 2961

What makes a place? Rebecca Solnit reinvents the traditional atlas, searching for layers of meaning & connections of experience across San Francisco.
Posted in History

Island People

The Caribbean and the World

Author: Joshua Jelly-Schapiro

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385349777

Category: Travel

Page: 464

View: 6397

A masterwork of travel literature and of history: voyaging from Cuba to Jamaica, Puerto Rico to Trinidad, Haiti to Barbados, and islands in between, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro offers a kaleidoscopic portrait of each society, its culture and politics, connecting this region’s common heritage to its fierce grip on the world’s imagination. From the moment Columbus gazed out from the Santa María's deck in 1492 at what he mistook for an island off Asia, the Caribbean has been subjected to the misunderstandings and fantasies of outsiders. Running roughshod over the place, they have viewed these islands and their inhabitants as exotic allure to be consumed or conquered. The Caribbean stood at the center of the transatlantic slave trade for more than three hundred years, with societies shaped by mass migrations and forced labor. But its people, scattered across a vast archipelago and separated by the languages of their colonizers, have nonetheless together helped make the modern world—its politics, religion, economics, music, and culture. Jelly-Schapiro gives a sweeping account of how these islands’ inhabitants have searched and fought for better lives. With wit and erudition, he chronicles this “place where globalization began,” and introduces us to its forty million people who continue to decisively shape our world. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Travel

You Are Here: NYC

Mapping the Soul of the City

Author: Katharine Harmon

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 1616895497

Category: Design

Page: 192

View: 4887

Maps are magical. Every graphic, like every story, has a point of view, and New York is rife with mapmaking possibilities, thick with mythology, and glutted with history. You Are Here: NYC assembles some two hundred maps charting every inch and facet of the five boroughs, depicting New Yorks of past and present, and a city that never was. "A Nightclub Map of Harlem" traces a boozy night from the Radium and the Cotton Club to the Savoy and then the Lafayette; "Wonders of New York" pinpoints three hundred sites of interest, including the alleged location of Captain Kidd's buried treasure; the Ghostbusters subway map plots the route from Astral Projections Place to Stay Puft Street; and a rejected proposal of ornate topiaries illustrates a Central Park that might have been. This sequel to the best-selling You Are Here includes original essays by Bob Mankoff, Maria Popova, Sarah Boxer, and Rebecca Cooper, among others.
Posted in Design

Revolting New York

How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising, and Revolution Shaped a City

Author: Neil Smith,Don Mitchell

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820352802

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 3487

Occupy Wall Street did not come from nowhere. It was part of a long history of riot, revolt, uprising, and sometimes even revolution that has shaped New York City. From the earliest European colonization to the present, New Yorkers have been revolting. Hard hitting, revealing, and insightful, Revolting New York tells the story of New York’s evolution through revolution, a story of near-continuous popular (and sometimes not-so-popular) uprising. Richly illustrated with more than ninety historical and contemporary images, historical maps, and maps drawn especially for the book, Revolting New York provides the first comprehensive account of the historical geography of revolt in New York, from the earliest uprisings of the Munsee against the Dutch occupation of Manhattan in the seventeenth century to the Black Lives Matter movement and the unrest of the Trump era. Through this rich narrative, editors Neil Smith and Don Mitchell reveal a continuous, if varied and punctuated, history of rebellion in New York that is as vital as the more standard histories of formal politics, planning, economic growth, and restructuring that largely define our consciousness of New York’s story. Contributors: Marnie Brady, Kathleen Dunn, Zultán Gluck, Rachel Goffe, Harmony Goldberg, Amanda Huron, Malav Kanuga, Esteban Kelly, Manissa McCleave Maharawal, Don Mitchell, Justin Sean Myers, Brendan P. O’Malley, Raymond Pettit, Miguelina Rodriguez, Jenjoy Roybal, McNair Scott, Erin Siodmak, Neil Smith, Peter Waldman, and Nicole Watson.
Posted in Social Science

Hispanas de Queens

Latino Panethnicity in a New York City Neighborhood

Author: Milagros Ricourt,Ruby Danta

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801487958

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 3926

What happens when persons of several Latin American national groups reside in the same neighborhood— Milagros Ricourt and Ruby Danta consider the stories of women of different nationalities—Colombian, Cuban, Dominican, Ecuadorian, Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Uruguayan, and others—who live together in Corona, a working-class neighborhood in Queens. Corona has long been an arrival point for immigrants and is now made up predominantly of Spanish-speaking immigrants from the Caribbean and South and Central America, with smaller numbers from Asia, Africa, and Europe. There are also long-established populations of white Americans, mainly of Italian origin, and African Americans.The authors find that the new pan-Latin American community in Corona has emerged from the interactions of everyday living. Hispanas de Queens focuses on the places where women gather in Corona—bodegas, hospitals, schoolyards, and Roman Catholic and Protestant churches—to show how informal alliances arise from proximity.Ricourt and Danta document how a group of leaders, mainly women, consciously promoted this strong sense of community to build panethnic organizations and a Latino political voice. Hispanas de Queens shows how a new group identity—Hispanic or Latino—is formed without replacing an individual's identification as an immigrant from a particular country. Instead, an additional identity is created and can be mobilized by pan-Latino leaders and organizations.
Posted in Social Science

Fitzgerald

Geography of a Revolution

Author: William Bunge

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820339741

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 8069

This on-the-ground study of one square mile in Detroit was written in collaboration with neighborhood residents, many of whom were involved with the famous Detroit Geographical Expedition and Institute. Fitzgerald, at its core, is dedicated to understanding global phenomena through the intensive study of a small, local place. Beginning with an 1816 encounter between the Ojibwa population and the neighborhood's first surveyor, William Bunge examines the racialized imposition of local landscapes over the course of European American settlement. Historical events are firmly situated in space--a task Bunge accomplishes through liberal use of maps and frequent references to recognizable twentieth-century landmarks. More than a work of historical geography, Fitzgerald is a political intervention. By 1967 the neighborhood was mostly African American; Black Power was ascendant; and Detroit would experience a major riot. Immersed in the daily life of the area, Bunge encouraged residents to tell their stories and to think about local politics in spatial terms. His desire to undertake a different sort of geography led him to create a work that was nothing like a typical work of social science. The jumble of text, maps, and images makes it a particularly urgent book--a major theoretical contribution to urban geography that is also a startling evocation of street-level Detroit during a turbulent era. A Sarah Mills Hodge Fund Publication
Posted in Political Science

Privately Owned Public Space

The New York City Experience

Author: Jerold S. Kayden,New York (N.Y.). Dept. of City Planning,Municipal Art Society of New York

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780471362579

Category: Architecture

Page: 349

View: 7533

Until now, comprehensive, systematic knowledge about this vast collection of public spaces has not existed, either for experts or members of the public. Through words, photographs, scaled site plans, maps, and analysis of newly assembled data, the book examines the history, law, design, and use of the city's privately owned public spaces. Each of the more than 500 spaces is individually discussed to provide far-reaching comparative information about this unique category of public space.
Posted in Architecture

Silicon City: San Francisco in the Long Shadow of the Valley

Author: Cary McClelland

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393608808

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 6967

An intimate, eye-opening portrait of San Francisco transformed by the tech boom. San Francisco is changing at warp speed. Famously home to artists and activists, and known as the birthplace of the Beats, the Black Panthers, and the LGBTQ movement, in recent decades the Bay Area has been reshaped by Silicon Valley, the engine of the new American economy. The richer the region gets, the more unequal and less diverse it becomes, and cracks in the city’s facade—rapid gentrification, an epidemic of evictions, rising crime, atrophied public institutions—have started to show. Inspired by Studs Terkel’s classic works of oral history, writer and filmmaker Cary McClelland spent several years interviewing people at the epicenter of the recent change, from venture capitalists and coders to politicians and protesters, from native sons and daughters to the city’s newest arrivals. The crisp and vivid stories of Silicon City’s diverse cast capture San Francisco as never before. The book opens with a longtime tour guide recounting the history of the original Gold Rush and observing how little the people of his city pay attention to its history; it ends on Fisherman’s Wharf, with the proprietor of an arcade game museum reminding us that even today’s technology will become relics of the past. In between we hear from people who have passed through Apple, Google, eBay, Intel, and the other big tech companies of our time. And we meet those who are experiencing the changes at the grassroots level: a homeless advocate in Haight-Ashbury, an Oakland rapper, a pawnbroker in the Mission, a man who helped dismantle and rebuild the Bay Bridge, and a woman who runs a tattoo parlor in the Castro. Silicon City masterfully weaves together a candid conversation across a divided community to create a dynamic portrait of a beloved city—and a cautionary tale for the entire country.
Posted in Social Science

The City

The Basics

Author: Kevin Archer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415670802

Category: Science

Page: 219

View: 9668

The City: The Basics provides a brief yet compelling overview of the study of cities and city life. The book draws on a range of perspectives – economic, political, cultural, and environmental aspects are all considered – to provide a broad comparison of the evolution of cities in the rich Global North and the poorer Global South. Topics covered in the book include: a brief history of cities from ancient times to the post-modern present the differences between "global cities" in the North and "megacities" in the South the environmental impact of urban life and the idea of sustainable cities urban planning, urban politics and urban poverty. Featuring suggestions for further reading, recommended websites and a number of maps and illustrations, this is the ideal starting point for those interested in any aspect of cities or urban studies.
Posted in Science

International Express

New Yorkers on the 7 Train

Author: Stéphane Tonnelat,William Kornblum

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231543611

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 8981

Nicknamed the International Express, the New York City Transit Authority 7 subway line runs through a highly diverse series of ethnic and immigrant neighborhoods in Queens. People from Andean South America, Central America, China, India, Italy, Korea, Mexico, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, and Vietnam, as well as residents of a number of gentrifying blue-collar and industrial neighborhoods, fill the busy streets around the stations. The 7 train is a microcosm of a specifically urban, New York experience, in which individuals from a variety of cultures and social classes are forced to interact and get along with one another. For newcomers to the city, mastery of life in the subway space is a step toward assimilation into their new home. In International Express, the French ethnographer Stéphane Tonnelat and his collaborator William Kornblum, a native New Yorker, ride the 7 subway line to better understand the intricacies of this phenomenon. They also ask a group of students with immigrant backgrounds to keep diaries of their daily rides on the 7 train. What develops over time, they find, is a set of shared subway competences leading to a practical cosmopolitanism among riders, including immigrants and their children, that changes their personal values and attitudes toward others in small, subtle ways. This growing civility helps newcomers feel at home in an alien city and builds what the authors call a "situational community in transit." Yet riding the subway can be problematic, especially for women and teenagers. Tonnelat and Kornblum pay particular attention to gender and age relations on the 7 train. Their portrait of integrated mass transit, including a discussion of the relationship between urban density and diversity, is invaluable for social scientists and urban planners eager to enhance the cooperative experience of city living for immigrants and ease the process of cultural transition.
Posted in Social Science

Manhattan Street Names Past and Present

Author: Don Rogerson

Publisher: Griffin Rose Press

ISBN: 9780988813724

Category: Historic sites

Page: 166

View: 8674

A guide to the origins of current and historic street names of Manhattan. Do you know where to find Oyster Pasty Alley, Dirty Lane, or the Golden Hill? Ever wonder about the men and women (and sometimes children) whose names now adorn Manhattan's streets? Over 1,000 cross-referenced entries trace the history of Manhattan's street names and reflect the growth of the city. Illustrations show the locations of historic streets and some of the street plans that were never officially adopted. Notes and a full bibliography provide a wealth of information for further exploration. An entertaining guide and useful reference for visitors, residents, and anyone interested in the fascinating history of Manhattan.
Posted in Historic sites

Double Trouble

Black Mayors, Black Communities, and the Call for a Deep Democracy

Author: J. Phillip Thompson

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195177339

Category: Political Science

Page: 338

View: 5184

This book provides the first in-depth look at how the black mayors of America's major cities achieve social change. Thompson argues that African-American mayors, legislators, and political activists need to more effectively challenge opinions and public policies supported by the white public and encourage greater political inclusion and open political discourse within black communities. Tracing the historical development and contemporary practice of black mayoral politics, this is a fascinating study of the motivations of black politicians, competing ideologies in the black community and the inner dynamics of urban social change.
Posted in Political Science

The Assassination of New York

Author: Robert Fitch

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453234039

Category: Political Science

Page: 318

View: 5635

The story of how the richest city in the world became one of the poorest in North America, with a new introduction by Peter Kwong How did New York City come to be a network of steel towers, banks, and nail salons, with chain drugstores on every block—a place where, increasingly, no one can afford to live except the lords of Wall Street and foreign billionaires, and where more and more of the Big Apple’s best-loved businesses have closed their doors? It didn’t start with Michael Bloomberg—or with Robert Moses. As Robert Fitch meticulously demonstrates in this eye-opening book, the planning to assassinate New York began a century ago, as the city’s very richest few—the Morgans, the Mellons, and especially the Rockefellers—looked for ways to maximize the value of their real estate by pushing Gotham’s vibrant and astonishingly varied manufacturing sector out of town, and with it, the city’s working class. The Assassination of New York attacks a Goliath-like enemy: the real-estate developers who maintain a stranglehold on the city’s most valuable commodity. Their efforts to increase land value by replacing low-rent workers and factories with high-rent professionals and office buildings was one of the single most decisive factors in the city’s downturn. In the 1980s the number of real-estate vacancies eclipsed that of the fiscal crisis of the 1970s. In September of 1992 there was a staggering twenty-five million square feet of empty office space. Are the city’s problems fixable? How will the future of New York play out through the twenty-first century? Fitch comes up with solutions, from saving jobs to promoting economic diversity to rebuilding the crumbling infrastructure. But it will take vision and hard work to restore New York to what it once was while creating a new and better home for coming generations.
Posted in Political Science

In the Company of Crows and Ravens

Author: John M. Marzluff,Tony Angell

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300135268

Category: Nature

Page: 408

View: 5497

“Crows and people share similar traits and social strategies. To a surprising extent, to know the crow is to know ourselves.”—from the Preface From the cave walls at Lascaux to the last painting by Van Gogh, from the works of Shakespeare to those of Mark Twain, there is clear evidence that crows and ravens influence human culture. Yet this influence is not unidirectional, say the authors of this fascinating book: people profoundly influence crow culture, ecology, and evolution as well. John Marzluff and Tony Angell examine the often surprising ways that crows and humans interact. The authors contend that those interactions reflect a process of “cultural coevolution.” They offer a challenging new view of the human-crow dynamic—a view that may change our thinking not only about crows but also about ourselves. Featuring more than 100 original drawings, the book takes a close look at the influences people have had on the lives of crows throughout history and at the significant ways crows have altered human lives. In the Company of Crows and Ravens illuminates the entwined histories of crows and people and concludes with an intriguing discussion of the crow-human relationship and how our attitudes toward crows may affect our cultural trajectory.
Posted in Nature

Savage Dreams

A Journey Into the Hidden Wars of the American West

Author: Rebecca Solnit

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520282280

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 7989

"A beautiful, absorbing, tragic book."—Larry McMurtry In 1851, a war began in what would become Yosemite National Park, a war against the indigenous inhabitants. A century later–in 1951–and a hundred and fifty miles away, another war began when the U.S. government started setting off nuclear bombs at the Nevada Test Site. It was called a nuclear testing program, but functioned as a war against the land and people of the Great Basin. In this foundational book of landscape theory and environmental thinking, Rebecca Solnit explores our national Eden and Armageddon and offers a pathbreaking history of the west, focusing on the relationship between culture and its implementation as politics. In a new preface, she considers the continuities and changes of these invisible wars in the context of our current climate change crisis, and reveals how the long arm of these histories continue to inspire her writing and hope.
Posted in History

Storming the Gates of Paradise

Landscapes for Politics

Author: Rebecca Solnit

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520256569

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7029

An anthology of nearly forty essays, representing the author's work over the past ten years, offers an insightful overview of American politics, current affairs, culture, society, and history, written from the perspective of a noted environmentalist, anti-globalization activist, and public intellectual. By the author of A Field Guide to Getting Lost.
Posted in History

Judgmental Maps

Your City. Judged.

Author: Trent Gillaspie

Publisher: Flatiron Books

ISBN: 1250142695

Category: Humor

Page: 176

View: 1959

Your City. Judged A sharp tongued and fierce witted full-color collection of maps of America’s greatest cities in all their brutally honest glory. When you move to a new city you look at a map to get you where you need to be, but a Google Map of San Francisco won’t tell you where you can get “Real Dim Sum” or where “The Worst Trader Joes Ever” is. Or if you’re visiting Chicago, you might want to see the Magnificent Mile, but not know it’s right next to where “Suburbanites Buy Drugs” and “Retired Mafioso.” This is where Judgmental Maps comes in – a no holds barred look at city life that is at once a love letter and hate mail from the very people who live there. What started as a joke between comedian Trent Gillaspie and his friends in Denver, quickly grew into a viral sensation with a rabid and enthusiastic community labeling maps of their cities with names and descriptions we all think of, but are a bit too shy to say out loud. Collected here in a full color, beautifully packaged book with all new, never before published material, Judgmental Maps is laugh out loud funny from New York to Los Angeles, Minneapolis to Atlanta and offending everyone else in between.
Posted in Humor

The Historical Atlas of New York City, Second Edition

A Visual Celebration of 400 Years of New York City's History

Author: Eric Homberger

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0805078428

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 5568

A richly illustrated reference chronicles the history of New York City, from early Native American culture to the present day, capturing the events, inhabitants, neighborhoods, ethnic diversity, and more in a collection of full-color maps, period photographs, drawings, charts, and concise essays. Original. 25,000 first printing.
Posted in History