Newsgames

Journalism at Play

Author: Ian Bogost,Simon Ferrari,Bobby Schweizer

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262014874

Category: Games

Page: 235

View: 5548

Journalism has embraced digital media in its struggle to survive. But most online journalism just translates existing practices to the Web: stories are written and edited as they are for print; video and audio features are produced as they would be for television and radio. The authors of Newsgames propose a new way of doing good journalism: videogames. Videogames are native to computers rather than a digitized form of prior media. Games simulate how things work by constructing interactive models; journalism as game involves more than just revisiting old forms of news production. The book describes newsgames that can persuade, inform, and titillate; make information interactive; re-create a historical event; put news content into a puzzle; teach journalism; and build a community. Wired magazine's game Cutthroat Capitalism, for example, explains the economics of Somali piracy by putting the player in command of a pirate ship, offering choices for hostage negotiation strategies. And Powerful Robot's game September 12th offers a model for a short, quickly produced, and widely distributed editorial newsgame. Videogames do not offer a panacea for the ills of contemporary news organizations. But if the industry embraces them as a viable method of doing journalism--not just an occasional treat for online readers--newsgames can make a valuable contribution.
Posted in Games

Digitales, spielbasiertes Lernen im Politikunterricht

Der Einsatz von Computerspielen in der Sekundarstufe

Author: Marc Motyka

Publisher: Springer-Verlag

ISBN: 3658213868

Category: Education

Page: 332

View: 2032

Marc Motyka untersucht die Potenziale des Mediums Computerspiel für den Politikunterricht aus einer instruktionstheoretischen Perspektive. Im Zentrum dieses Bestrebens steht eine experimentelle Vergleichsgruppen-Untersuchung mit drei Messzeitpunkten zu den Auswirkungen des digitalen Lernspiels ‚Food Force‘ auf den Wissenserwerb, die Motivation sowie die Einstellung von Lernenden der neunten Klassenstufe. Die Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass im Medium Computerspiel ungenutzte didaktische Potenziale stecken. Dies trifft insbesondere auf das Fach Politik zu, für das bereits viele digitale Lernspiele vorliegen.
Posted in Education

Die Gesellschaft der Daten

Über die digitale Transformation der sozialen Ordnung

Author: Florian Süssenguth

Publisher: transcript Verlag

ISBN: 3839427649

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 2413

Big Data, Social Media, Computational Journalism, Industrie 4.0 - hinter all diesen Chiffren blitzen die Anzeichen des Beginns einer umgreifenden Veränderung der Gesellschaft durch die Möglichkeiten digitaler Datenverarbeitung auf. Welchen Stellenwert hat das zukunftsoffene Experimentieren mit diesen neuen Daten, in deren Gesellschaft wir uns in jedem Moment befinden und die alle unsere Praktiken durchdringen? Und wie ist dies angemessen wissenschaftlich zu beschreiben? Perspektivenreich zeigen die Autorinnen und Autoren des Bandes, darunter Bruno Latour, Karin Knorr Cetina, Christoph Bieber, Christoph Neuberger und Karl-Heinz Ladeur, die Möglichkeiten auf, das theoretische und empirische Inventar der Gesellschaftswissenschaften am Gegenstand der Digitalisierung zu schärfen.
Posted in Social Science

Digitale Langformen im Journalismus und Corporate Publishing

Scrollytelling - Webdokumentationen - Multimediastorys

Author: Alexander Godulla,Cornelia Wolf

Publisher: Springer-Verlag

ISBN: 3658175567

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 253

View: 7799

Der Band bietet eine fundierte Untersuchung neuer Darstellungsformen zur Hintergrundinformation im stationären und mobilen Internet. Dabei werden sowohl die Nutzererwartungen, die Rezeptionsvorgänge, die Produktionsbedingungen als auch die Angebote im Journalismus und Corporate Publishing analysiert. Der Fokus liegt dabei auf Formen des digitalen Storytelling, nichtlinearen Erzählstrukturen sowie publizistischen und ökonomischen Chancen.
Posted in Language Arts & Disciplines

Learning in Real and Virtual Worlds

Commercial Video Games as Educational Tools

Author: P. Lacasa

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113731205X

Category: Education

Page: 274

View: 4763

Packed with critical analysis and real-life examples, this book explores how children's video games can cultivate learning. Lacasa takes several commercial video games and shows how they can be used both in and out of the classroom to teach initiative and problem-solving, encourage creativity, promote literacy, and develop reasoning skills.
Posted in Education

Gaming Globally

Production, Play, and Place

Author: N. Huntemann,B. Aslinger

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137006331

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 279

View: 6299

Video games are inherently transnational by virtue of industrial, textual, and player practices. The contributors touch upon nations not usually examined by game studies - including the former Czechoslovakia, Turkey, India, and Brazil - and also add new perspectives to the global hubs of China, Singapore, Australia, Japan, and the United States.
Posted in Sports & Recreation

Unit Operations

An Approach to Videogame Criticism

Author: Ian Bogost

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262261898

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 6107

In Unit Operations, Ian Bogost argues that similar principles underlie both literary theory and computation, proposing a literary-technical theory that can be used to analyze particular videogames. Moreover, this approach can be applied beyond videogames: Bogost suggests that any medium -- from videogames to poetry, literature, cinema, or art -- can be read as a configurative system of discrete, interlocking units of meaning, and he illustrates this method of analysis with examples from all these fields. The marriage of literary theory and information technology, he argues, will help humanists take technology more seriously and hep technologists better understand software and videogames as cultural artifacts. This approach is especially useful for the comparative analysis of digital and nondigital artifacts and allows scholars from other fields who are interested in studying videogames to avoid the esoteric isolation of "game studies."The richness of Bogost's comparative approach can be seen in his discussions of works by such philosophers and theorists as Plato, Badiou, Zizek, and McLuhan, and in his analysis of numerous videogames including Pong, Half-Life, and Star Wars Galaxies. Bogost draws on object technology and complex adaptive systems theory for his method of unit analysis, underscoring the configurative aspects of a wide variety of human processes. His extended analysis of freedom in large virtual spaces examines Grand Theft Auto 3, The Legend of Zelda, Flaubert's Madame Bovary, and Joyce's Ulysses. In Unit Operations, Bogost not only offers a new methodology for videogame criticism but argues for the possibility of real collaboration between the humanities and information technology.
Posted in Social Science

Racing the Beam

The Atari Video Computer System

Author: Nick Montfort,Ian Bogost

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262261529

Category: Games

Page: 192

View: 3390

The Atari Video Computer System dominated the home video game market so completely that "Atari" became the generic term for a video game console. The Atari VCS was affordable and offered the flexibility of changeable cartridges. Nearly a thousand of these were created, the most significant of which established new techniques, mechanics, and even entire genres. This book offers a detailed and accessible study of this influential video game console from both computational and cultural perspectives. Studies of digital media have rarely investigated platforms--the systems underlying computing. This book (the first in a series of Platform Studies) does so, developing a critical approach that examines the relationship between platforms and creative expression. Nick Montfort and Ian Bogost discuss the Atari VCS itself and examine in detail six game cartridges: Combat, Adventure, Pac-Man, Yars' Revenge, Pitfall!, and Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. They describe the technical constraints and affordances of the system and track developments in programming, gameplay, interface, and aesthetics. Adventure, for example, was the first game to represent a virtual space larger than the screen (anticipating the boundless virtual spaces of such later games as World of Warcraft and Grand Theft Auto), by allowing the player to walk off one side into another space; and Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back was an early instance of interaction between media properties and video games. Montfort and Bogost show that the Atari VCS--often considered merely a retro fetish object--is an essential part of the history of video games.
Posted in Games

Persuasive Games

The Expressive Power of Videogames

Author: Ian Bogost

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262261944

Category: Games

Page: 464

View: 4453

Videogames are an expressive medium, and a persuasive medium; they represent how real and imagined systems work, and they invite players to interact with those systems and form judgments about them. In this innovative analysis, Ian Bogost examines the way videogames mount arguments and influence players. Drawing on the 2,500-year history of rhetoric, the study of persuasive expression, Bogost analyzes rhetoric's unique function in software in general and videogames in particular. The field of media studies already analyzes visual rhetoric, the art of using imagery and visual representation persuasively. Bogost argues that videogames, thanks to their basic representational mode of procedurality (rule-based representations and interactions), open a new domain for persuasion; they realize a new form of rhetoric. Bogost calls this new form "procedural rhetoric," a type of rhetoric tied to the core affordances of computers: running processes and executing rule-based symbolic manipulation. He argues further that videogames have a unique persuasive power that goes beyond other forms of computational persuasion. Not only can videogames support existing social and cultural positions, but they can also disrupt and change these positions themselves, leading to potentially significant long-term social change. Bogost looks at three areas in which videogame persuasion has already taken form and shows considerable potential: politics, advertising, and learning.
Posted in Games

Inter/vention

Free Play in the Age of Electracy

Author: N.A

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262300907

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9718

Posted in

The Gameful World

Approaches, Issues, Applications

Author: Steffen P. Walz,Sebastian Deterding

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262325721

Category: Computers

Page: 688

View: 9777

What if our whole life were turned into a game? What sounds like the premise of a science fiction novel is today becoming reality as "gamification." As more and more organizations, practices, products, and services are infused with elements from games and play to make them more engaging, we are witnessing a veritable ludification of culture.Yet while some celebrate gamification as a possible answer to mankind's toughest challenges and others condemn it as a marketing ruse, the question remains: what are the ramifications of this "gameful world"? Can game design energize society and individuals, or will algorithmicincentive systems become our new robot overlords?In this book, more than fifty luminaries from academia and industry examine the key challenges of gamification and the ludification of culture -- including Ian Bogost, John M. Carroll, Bernie DeKoven, Bill Gaver, Jane McGonigal, Frank Lantz, Jesse Schell, Kevin Slavin, McKenzie Wark, and Eric Zimmerman. They outline major disciplinary approaches, including rhetorics, economics, psychology, and aesthetics; tackle issues like exploitation or privacy; and survey main application domains such as health, education, design, sustainability, or social media.
Posted in Computers

Codename Revolution

The Nintendo Wii Platform

Author: Steven E. Jones,George K. Thiruvathukal

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262300532

Category: Games

Page: 216

View: 9884

The Nintendo Wii, introduced in 2006, helped usher in a moment of retro-reinvention in video game play. This hugely popular console system, codenamed Revolution during development, signaled a turn away from fully immersive, time-consuming MMORPGs or forty-hour FPS games and back toward family fun in the living room. Players using the wireless motion-sensitive controller (the Wii Remote, or "Wiimote") play with their whole bodies, waving, swinging, swaying. The mimetic interface shifts attention from what's on the screen to what's happening in physical space. This book describes the Wii's impact in technological, social, and cultural terms, examining the Wii as a system of interrelated hardware and software that was consciously designed to promote social play in physical space. Each chapter of Codename Revolution focuses on a major component of the Wii as a platform: the console itself, designed to be low-powered and nimble; the iconic Wii Remote; Wii Fit Plus, and its controller, the Wii Balance Board; the Wii Channels interface and Nintendo's distribution system; and the Wii as a social platform that not only affords multiplayer options but also encourages social interaction in shared physical space. Finally, the authors connect the Wii's revolution in mimetic interface gaming -- which eventually led to the release of Sony's Move and Microsoft's Kinect -- to some of the economic and technological conditions that influence the possibility of making something new in this arena of computing and culture.
Posted in Games

The Future Was Here

The Commodore Amiga

Author: Jimmy Maher

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262300745

Category: Games

Page: 344

View: 5700

Long ago, in 1985, personal computers came in two general categories: the friendly, childish game machine used for fun (exemplified by Atari and Commodore products); and the boring, beige adult box used for business (exemplified by products from IBM). The game machines became fascinating technical and artistic platforms that were of limited real-world utility. The IBM products were all utility, with little emphasis on aesthetics and no emphasis on fun. Into this bifurcated computing environment came the Commodore Amiga 1000. This personal computer featured a palette of 4,096 colors, unprecedented animation capabilities, four-channel stereo sound, the capacity to run multiple applications simultaneously, a graphical user interface, and powerful processing potential. It was, Jimmy Maher writes in The Future Was Here, the world's first true multimedia personal computer. Maher argues that the Amiga's capacity to store and display color photographs, manipulate video (giving amateurs access to professional tools), and use recordings of real-world sound were the seeds of the digital media future: digital cameras, Photoshop, MP3 players, and even YouTube, Flickr, and the blogosphere. He examines different facets of the platform -- from Deluxe Paint to AmigaOS to Cinemaware -- in each chapter, creating a portrait of the platform and the communities of practice that surrounded it. Of course, Maher acknowledges, the Amiga was not perfect: the DOS component of the operating systems was clunky and ill-matched, for example, and crashes often accompanied multitasking attempts. And Commodore went bankrupt in 1994. But for a few years, the Amiga's technical qualities were harnessed by engineers, programmers, artists, and others to push back boundaries and transform the culture of computing.
Posted in Games

10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10

Author: Nick Montfort,Patsy Baudoin,John Bell,Ian Bogost,Jeremy Douglass,Mark C. Marino,Michael Mateas,Casey Reas,Mark Sample,Noah Vawter

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262304570

Category: Computers

Page: 328

View: 309

This book takes a single line of code -- the extremely concise BASIC program for the Commodore 64 inscribed in the title -- and uses it as a lens through which to consider the phenomenon of creative computing and the way computer programs exist in culture. The authors of this collaboratively written book treat code not as merely functional but as a text -- in the case of 10 PRINT, a text that appeared in many different printed sources -- that yields a story about its making, its purpose, its assumptions, and more. They consider randomness and regularity in computing and art, the maze in culture, the popular BASIC programming language, and the highly influential Commodore 64 computer.
Posted in Computers

I Am Error

The Nintendo Family Computer / Entertainment System Platform

Author: Nathan Altice

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262328402

Category: Computers

Page: 440

View: 8694

In the 1987 Nintendo Entertainment System videogame Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, a character famously declared: I AM ERROR. Puzzled players assumed that this cryptic mesage was a programming flaw, but it was actually a clumsy Japanese-English translation of "My Name is Error," a benign programmer's joke. In I AM ERROR Nathan Altice explores the complex material histories of the Nintendo Entertainment System (and its Japanese predecessor, the Family Computer), offering a detailed analysis of its programming and engineering, its expressive affordances, and its cultural significance.Nintendo games were rife with mistranslated texts, but, as Altice explains, Nintendo's translation challenges were not just linguistic but also material, with consequences beyond simple misinterpretation. Emphasizing the technical and material evolution of Nintendo's first cartridge-based platform, Altice describes the development of the Family Computer (or Famicom) and its computational architecture; the "translation" problems faced while adapting the Famicom for the U.S. videogame market as the redesigned Entertainment System; Nintendo's breakthrough console title Super Mario Bros. and its remarkable software innovations; the introduction of Nintendo's short-lived proprietary disk format and the design repercussions on The Legend of Zelda; Nintendo's efforts to extend their console's lifespan through cartridge augmentations; the Famicom's Audio Processing Unit (APU) and its importance for the chiptunes genre; and the emergence of software emulators and the new kinds of play they enabled.
Posted in Computers

Besser als die Wirklichkeit!

Warum wir von Computerspielen profitieren und wie sie die Welt verändern

Author: Jane McGonigal

Publisher: Heyne Verlag

ISBN: 364109741X

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 1440

Warum Computerspiele nicht blöd, sondern schlau machen Die Menschheit spielt. Immerzu. Überall. Ununterbrochen. Über 3 Milliarden Stunden werden jede Woche weltweit mit Spielen verbracht. Und die Zahl wächst, denn immer mehr Menschen erliegen der Faszination von Computerspielen. Aber muss man deshalb klagen über Isolation und Kulturverfall? – Jane McGonigal, laut »BusinessWeek« eine der zehn wichtigsten und innovativsten Spieleentwicklerinnen der Welt, kehrt die Perspektive um und stellt die spannende Frage: Was, wenn wir die immense Kreativität, die Leidenschaft und das Engagement, das wir ins Spielen investieren, für die reale Welt nutzbar machen? Computerspiele bieten Belohnungen, Herausforderungen und Siege, die uns die reale Welt nur allzu oft vorenthält. Aber wer sagt, dass wir das Potenzial von Spielen allein zur Wirklichkeitsflucht und zu Unterhaltungszwecken nutzen müssen? Für Jane McGonigal sind Gamer hoch kompetente Problemlöser und passionierte Teamplayer. Ihre bestechende These: Nutzen wir diese enormen Ressourcen doch, um unsere sozialen, wirtschaftlichen oder medizinischen Probleme zu lösen! Ein überwältigend neuer und überzeugender Blick auf die positive Wirkung, die im Spielen steckt – eine bahnbrechende Analyse, mit der Jane McGonigal eindrucksvoll bestätigt, dass sie von der Zeitschrift »Fast Company« zu Recht unter die »100 kreativsten Menschen der Wirtschaft« gewählt wurde!
Posted in Social Science

Peripheral Vision

Bell Labs, the S-C 4020, and the Origins of Computer Art

Author: Zabet Patterson

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262330075

Category: Computers

Page: 152

View: 2385

In 1959, the electronics manufacturer Stromberg-Carlson produced the S-C 4020, a device that allowed mainframe computers to present and preserve images. In the mainframe era, the output of text and image was quite literally peripheral; the S-C 4020 -- a strange and elaborate apparatus, with a cathode ray screen, a tape deck, a buffer unit, a film camera, and a photo-paper camera -- produced most of the computer graphics of the late 1950s and early 1960s. At Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, the S-C 4020 became a crucial part of ongoing encounters among art, science, and technology. In this book, Zabet Patterson examines the extraordinary uses to which the Bell Labs SC-2040 was put between 1961 and 1972, exploring a series of early computer art projects shaped by the special computational affordances of the S-C 4020. The S-C 4020 produced tabular data, graph plotting and design drawings, grid projections, and drawings of axes and vectors; it made previously impossible visualizations possible. Among the works Patterson describes are E. E. Zajac's short film of an orbiting satellite, which drew on the machine's graphic capacities as well as the mainframe's calculations; a groundbreaking exhibit of "computer generated pictures" by Béla Julesz and Michael Noll, two scientists interested in visualization; animations by Kenneth Knowlton and the Bell Labs artist-in-residence Stan VanDerBeek; and Lillian Schwartz's "cybernetic" film Pixillation.Arguing for the centrality of a peripheral, Patterson makes a case for considering computational systems not simply as machines but in their cultural and historical context.
Posted in Computers

Between Humanities and the Digital

Author: Patrik Svensson,David Theo Goldberg

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262328372

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 592

View: 9472

Between Humanities and the Digital offers an expansive vision of how the humanities engage with digital and information technology, providing a range of perspectives on a quickly evolving, contested, and exciting field. It documents the multiplicity of ways that humanities scholars have turned increasingly to digital and information technology as both a scholarly tool and a cultural object in need of analysis.The contributors explore the state of the art in digital humanities from varied disciplinary perspectives, offer a sample of digitally inflected work that ranges from an analysis of computational literature to the collaborative development of a "Global Middle Ages" humanities platform, and examine new models for knowledge production and infrastructure. Their contributions show not only that the digital has prompted the humanities to move beyond traditional scholarly horizons, but also that the humanities have pushed the digital to become more than a narrowly technical application. ContributorsIan Bogost, Anne Cong-Huyen, Mats Dahlström, Cathy N. Davidson, Johanna Drucker, Amy E. Earhart, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Maurizio Forte, Zephyr Frank, David Theo Goldberg, Jennifer González, Jo Guldi, N. Katherine Hayles, Geraldine Heng, Larissa Hjorth, Tim Hutchings, Henry Jenkins, Matthew Kirschenbaum, Cecilia Lindhé, Alan Liu, Elizabeth Losh, Tara McPherson, Chandra Mukerji, Nick Montfort, Jenna Ng, Bethany Nowviskie, Jennie Olofsson, Lisa Parks, Natalie Phillips, Todd Presner, Stephen Rachman, Patricia Seed, Nishant Shah, Ray Siemens, Jentery Sayers, Jonathan Sterne, Patrik Svensson, William G. Thomas III, Whitney Anne Trettien, Michael Widner
Posted in Technology & Engineering

Minitel

Welcome to the Internet

Author: Julien Mailland,Kevin Driscoll

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262340216

Category: Computers

Page: 240

View: 1081

A decade before the Internet became a medium for the masses in the United States, tens of millions of users in France had access to a network for e-mail, e-commerce, chat, research, game playing, blogging, and even an early form of online porn. In 1983, the French government rolled out Minitel, a computer network that achieved widespread adoption in just a few years as the government distributed free terminals to every French telephone subscriber. With this volume, Julien Mailland and Kevin Driscoll offer the first scholarly book in English on Minitel, examining it as both a technical system and a cultural phenomenon. Mailland and Driscoll argue that Minitel was a technical marvel, a commercial success, and an ambitious social experiment. Other early networks may have introduced protocols and software standards that continue to be used today, but Minitel foretold the social effects of widespread telecomputing. They examine the unique balance of forces that enabled the growth of Minitel: public and private, open and closed, centralized and decentralized. Mailland and Driscoll describe Minitel's key technological components, novel online services, and thriving virtual communities. Despite the seemingly tight grip of the state, however, a lively Minitel culture emerged, characterized by spontaneity, imagination, and creativity. After three decades of continuous service, Minitel was shut down in 2012, but the history of Minitel should continue to inform our thinking about Internet policy, today and into the future.
Posted in Computers

Super Power, Spoony Bards, and Silverware

The Super Nintendo Entertainment System

Author: Dominic Arsenault

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262341506

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 240

View: 7896

This is a book about the Super Nintendo Entertainment System that is not celebratory or self-congratulatory. Most other accounts declare the Super NES the undisputed victor of the "16-bit console wars" of 1989--1995. In this book, Dominic Arsenault reminds us that although the SNES was a strong platform filled with high-quality games, it was also the product of a short-sighted corporate vision focused on maintaining Nintendo's market share and business model. This led the firm to fall from a dominant position during its golden age (dubbed by Arsenault the "ReNESsance") with the NES to the margins of the industry with the Nintendo 64 and GameCube consoles. Arsenault argues that Nintendo's conservative business strategies and resistance to innovation during the SNES years explain its market defeat by Sony's PlayStation. Extending the notion of "platform" to include the marketing forces that shape and constrain creative work, Arsenault draws not only on game studies and histories but on game magazines, boxes, manuals, and advertisements to identify the technological discourses and business models that formed Nintendo's Super Power. He also describes the cultural changes in video games during the 1990s that slowly eroded the love of gamer enthusiasts for the SNES as the Nintendo generation matured. Finally, he chronicles the many technological changes that occurred through the SNES's lifetime, including full-motion video, CD-ROM storage, and the shift to 3D graphics. Because of the SNES platform's architecture, Arsenault explains, Nintendo resisted these changes and continued to focus on traditional gameplay genres.
Posted in Games & Activities