Metropolitan Corridor

Railroads and the American Scene

Author: John R. Stilgoe

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300034813

Category: Transportation

Page: 397

View: 3424

An engaging and delightfully illustrated account of the impact of railroads on the American built environment and on American culture from the last decades of the nineteenth century to the 1930's.
Posted in Transportation

Train Time

Railroads and the Imminent Reshaping of the United States Landscape

Author: John R. Stilgoe

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813930502

Category: Architecture

Page: 304

View: 3072

Trains have a nostalgic connotation for most Americans, but John Stilgoe argues that we should be looking to rail lines as the path to our future, not just our past. Train Time picks up where his acclaimed work Metropolitan Corridor left off, carrying Stilgoe’s ideas about the spatial consequences of railways up to the present moment. With containers bringing the production of a global economy to our ports, the price of oil skyrocketing, and congestion and sprawl forcing many Americans to live far from work, trains offer an obvious alternative to a culture dependent on cars and long-haul trucking. Arguing that the train is returning, "an economic and cultural tsunami about to transform the United States," Stilgoe posits a future for railways as powerful shapers of American life. For anyone looking for prescient analysis and compelling history of the American landscape and economy in general and railroad and transit history in particular, Train Time is an engaging look at the future of our railroads and of transportation and land development. For those familiar with John Stilgoe’s talent for seeing things that elude the rest of us, and delivering those observations in pithy asides about real estate, corporate culture, and other aspects of American life, this book will not disappoint.
Posted in Architecture

The Dublin-Belfast Development Corridor: Ireland’s Mega-City Region?

Author: John Yarwood

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351891316

Category: Architecture

Page: 310

View: 5546

The aim of the Dublin-Belfast Development Corridor is to link several towns and cities by various modes of communication in order to create a poly-centric mega-city region in Ireland on a scale large enough to compete with the major urban clusters of continental Europe. This volume brings together an interdisciplinary team of leading scholars and practitioners from both sides of the border to discuss the Dublin-Belfast corridor and the associated challenges of cross-border development from economic, geographic, regional studies, sociological and planning perspectives. As well as providing insight into this important project, the book also throws light on regional development more generally.
Posted in Architecture

Concessions of Busways to the Private Sector

The São Paulo Metropolitan Region Experience

Author: Jorge Mariano Rebelo,Pedro P. Benvenuto

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN: N.A

Category: Bus lanes

Page: 14

View: 3986

Posted in Bus lanes

Interplaces

An Economic Geography of the Inter-urban and International Economies

Author: Nicholas A. Phelps

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192514911

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 9685

Much of the world's economic activity takes place in between cities and nations - the geographical containers that we have taken for granted for hundreds of years now. In this book Nicholas Phelps provides a guide to this uncharted territory within urban and economic geography. He highlights the importance of intermediary actors and processes in shaping this economy in between. From the airports, shopping malls, and office parks that have sprung up on the road between cities, to work done on the move in cars and trains, to the decisions made by internationally mobile networks of experts in conferences and negotiations. The geography of the economy in between is revealed as one involving four recurring and coexisting economic geographical formations - the agglomeration, the enclave, the networks, and the arena. Phelps sets out a multidisciplinary perspective and agenda on the question of the how, why, and where much contemporary economic activity takes place.
Posted in Business & Economics

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

Author: Eric Foner

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393244385

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 337

The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.
Posted in History

Lifeboat

Author: John R. Stilgoe

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813922218

Category: Architecture

Page: 325

View: 4870

The fire extinguisher; the airline safety card; the lifeboat. Until September 11, 2001, most Americans paid homage to these appurtenances of disaster with a sidelong glance, if at all. But John Stilgoe has been thinking about lifeboats ever since he listened with his father as the kitchen radio announced that the liner Lakonia had caught fire and sunk in the Atlantic. It was Christmas 1963, and airline travel and Cold War paranoia had made the images of an ocean liner’s distress—the air force dropping supplies in the dark, a freighter collecting survivors from lifeboats—seem like echoes of a bygone era. But Stilgoe, already a passionate reader and an aficionado of small-boat navigation, began to delve into accounts of other disasters at sea. What he found was a trunkful of hair-raising stories—of shipwreck, salvation, seamanship brilliant and inept, noble sacrifice, insanity, cannibalism, courage and cravenness, even scandal. In nonfiction accounts and in the works of Conrad, Melville, and Tomlinson, fear and survival animate and degrade human nature, in the microcosm of an open boat as in society at large. How lifeboats are made, rigged, and captained, Stilgoe discovered, and how accounts of their use or misuse are put down, says much about the culture and circumstances from which they are launched. In the hands of a skillful historian such as Stilgoe, the lifeboat becomes a symbol of human optimism, of engineering ingenuity, of bureaucratic regulation, of fear and frailty. Woven through Lifeboat are good old-fashioned yarns, thrilling tales of adventure that will quicken the pulse of readers who have enjoyed the novels of Patrick O’Brian, Crabwalk by Günter Grass, or works of nonfiction such as The Perfect Storm and In the Heart of the Sea. But Stilgoe, whose other works have plumbed suburban culture, locomotives, and the shore, is ultimately after bigger fish. Through the humble, much-ignored lifeboat, its design and navigation and the stories of its ultimate purpose, he has found a peculiar lens on roughly the past two centuries of human history, particularly the war-tossed, technology-driven history of man and the sea.
Posted in Architecture

Along the Route 100 Corridor

Author: Patricia A. Stompf Blackwell

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738536330

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 2137

The tiny villages along what is now known as the Route 100 Corridor are Bally, Eshbach, Bechtelsville, New Berlinville, Boyertown, and Washington Township, which consists of Schultzville, Barto, and Forgedale. In the late 1800s, the area's prosperous industry attracted such figures as Thomas Edison. The rich history of the area also includes the worst fire in U.S. history, the first Mennonite house of worship, one of the first Catholic missions in the thirteen original colonies, and a young missionary woman who traveled to India and perished on the Titanic. Through vintage photographs and descriptive captions, Along the Route 100 Corridor is a trip down these historic dirt roads with the early settlers.
Posted in History

Malaysia, Modernity and the Multimedia Super Corridor

A Critical Geography of Intelligent Landscapes

Author: Tim Bunnell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134519710

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 8661

Based on fieldwork in Malaysia, this book provides a critical examination of the country's main urban region. The study first provides a theoretical reworking of geographies of modernity and details the emergence of a globally-oriented, 'high-tech' stage of national development. The Multimedia Super Corridor is framed in terms of a political vision of a 'fully developed' Malaysia before the author traces an imagined trajectory through surrounding landscapes in the late 1990s. As the first book length academic analysis of the development of Kuala Lumpur Metropolitan Area and the construction of the Multimedia Super Corridor, this work offers a situated, contextual account which will appeal to all those with research interests in Asian Urban Studies and Asian Sociology.
Posted in Science

Developing Frontier Cities

Global Perspectives — Regional Contexts

Author: Harvey Lithwick,Yehuda Gradus

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401712352

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

View: 7835

The Unique Nature of Frontier Cities and their Development Challenge Harvey Lithwick and Yehuda Grad us The advent of government downsizing, and globalization has led to enormous com petitive pressures as well as the opening of new opportunities. How cities in remote frontier areas might cope with what for them might appear to be a devastating challenge is the subject of this book. Our concern is with frontier cities in particular. In our earlier study, Frontiers in Regional Development (Rowman and Littlefield, 1996), we examined the distinction between frontiers and peripheries. The terms are often used interchangeably, but we believe that in fact, both in scholarly works and in popular usage, very different connotations are conveyed by these concepts. Frontiers evoke a strong positive image, of sparsely settled territories, offering challenges, adventure, unspoiled natural land scapes, and a different, and for many an attractive life style. Frontiers are lands of opportunity. Peripheries conjure up negative images, of inaccessibility, inadequate services and political and economic marginality. They are places to escape from, rather than frontiers, which is were people escape to. Peripheries are places of and for losers.
Posted in Social Science

Uneasy Alchemy

Citizens and Experts in Louisiana's Chemical Corridor Disputes

Author: Barbara L. Allen

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262511346

Category: Medical

Page: 211

View: 6924

How coalitions of citizens and experts have been effective in promoting environmental justice in Louisiana's Chemical Corridor.
Posted in Medical

Landscape

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Human geography

Page: N.A

View: 2964

Posted in Human geography

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

Author: Eric Foner

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393244385

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8338

The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.
Posted in History

Reclaiming the Don

An Environmental History of Toronto's Don River Valley

Author: Jennifer L. Bonnell

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442696818

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 9051

A small river in a big city, the Don River Valley is often overlooked when it comes to explaining Toronto’s growth. With Reclaiming the Don, Jennifer L. Bonnell unearths the missing story of the relationship between the river, the valley, and the city, from the establishment of the town of York in the 1790s to the construction of the Don Valley Parkway in the 1960s. Demonstrating how mosquito-ridden lowlands, frequent floods, and over-burdened municipal waterways shaped the city’s development, Reclaiming the Don illuminates the impact of the valley as a physical and conceptual place on Toronto’s development. Bonnell explains how for more than two centuries the Don has served as a source of raw materials, a sink for wastes, and a place of refuge for people pushed to the edges of society, as well as the site of numerous improvement schemes that have attempted to harness the river and its valley to build a prosperous metropolis. Exploring the interrelationship between urban residents and their natural environments, she shows how successive generations of Toronto residents have imagined the Don as an opportunity, a refuge, and an eyesore. Combining extensive research with in-depth analysis, Reclaiming the Don will be a must-read for anyone interested in the history of Toronto’s development.
Posted in History

Prairie Passage

The Illinois and Michigan Canal Corridor

Author: Edward Ranney,Emily Harris

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252067142

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 9168

Completed in 1848, the Illinois & Michigan Canal stretched from Lake Michigan at Chicago's Navy Pier to the Illinois River at LaSalle-Peru. PRAIRIE PASSAGE commemorates the canal's 150th anniversary with 250 stunning photographs, many by the renowned Edward Ranney, and Preface by BLUE HIGHWAYS author William Least Heat-Moon. Tony Hiss's introductory text recounts the saga of the once mighty waterway. 250 photos.
Posted in History

Splintering Urbanism

Networked Infrastructures, Technological Mobilities and the Urban Condition

Author: Stephen Graham,Simon Marvin

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415189644

Category: Social Science

Page: 479

View: 7930

Splintering Urbanism makes an international and interdisciplinary analysis of the complex interactions between infrastructure networks and urban spaces. It delivers a new and powerful way of understanding contemporary urban change, bringing together discussions about: *globalization and the city *technology and society *urban space and urban networks *infrastructure and the built environment *developed, developing and post-communist worlds. With a range of case studies, illustrations and boxed examples, from New York to Jakarta, Johannesberg to Manila and Sao Paolo to Melbourne, Splintering Urbanism demonstrates the latest social, urban and technological theories, which give us an understanding of our contemporary metropolis.
Posted in Social Science

The Wisconsin Magazine of History

Author: Milo Milton Quaife,Joseph Schafer,Edward Porter Alexander

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Wisconsin

Page: N.A

View: 3142

Posted in Wisconsin