Looks Like Rain

Author: Damian Corless

Publisher: The Collins Press

ISBN: 1848898150

Category: Nature

Page: 224

View: 6341

The name the Romans gave to Ireland was Hibernia, which means ‘Land of Winter’, and cold feet may have been a factor in their decision to leave the Irish to their own devices. The weather is our main topic of conversation and has done its bit in shaping our character. This lively overview shines a light on incidents when the weather – generally bad – changed the course of Ireland’s history. Along the way it takes in those years – and there were quite a few – when the sun really didn’t shine. We learn how Oliver Cromwell, invincible in war, most likely caught his death from a Cork mosquito. The Irish climate created the heavy soil that made the potato flourish in Ireland like nowhere else, with disastrous consequences. David Lean came to Ireland fully intending to give the County Kerry weather a starring role in his film Ryan’s Daughter. He didn’t make another film for fourteen years. Our professional forecasters still hedge their bets by predicting four seasons in one day – and still often get it laughably wrong. But there are sunny stories too, such as how, in 1973, the brooding Antrim weather produced one of rock music’s greatest album covers, and how the Irish legend of the crock of gold at the rainbow’s end came about. Remarkably, Ireland’s weather has remained the same moderate mixed blessing since the Romans left.
Posted in Nature

Hopscotch and Queenie-i-o

Author: Damian Corless

Publisher: The Collins Press

ISBN: 1848895976

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 286

View: 4880

Before the 1970s flipped the switch to colour, Irish children ere raised in a world of black, white and an awful lot of grey. But kids, being kids, found endless ways to have fun. Do you remember Dáithí Lacha, Radio Caroline and holidays in Butlin’s Mosney? Then this is the book for you! Damian Corless takes us on a tongue-in-cheek trip down memory lane to the age of Let’s Draw With Bláithín, instant mashed potato and ‘Yellow Submarine’. Set against a backdrop of the space race and the miniskirt, this is a delightful celebration of the days we thought would never end (and some we’re glad are gone forever).
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

From Clery's Clock to Wanderly Wagon

Author: Damian Corless

Publisher: The Collins Press

ISBN: 1848898819

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 8285

Kerrygold butter. The Dublin Spire. The Buntús Cainte booklet. The DeLorean sports car. All of these things are an indisputable part of Irish history, yet never quite made the school curriculum. Damian Corless uses his trademark wit to trawl through our past and capture fleeting moments on the way to modern Ireland. Old reliables like the Angelus Bell, the Aran sweater, the shillelagh and the Jack Charlton mug spring fresh surprises. This is a seriously entertaining ramble through an alternative history of Ireland that you weren’t taught at school. Also by this author: Looks Like Rain: 9,000 Years of Irish Weather
Posted in History

You'll Ruin Your Dinner: Sweet Memories from Irish childhood

Author: Damian Corless

Publisher: Hachette Ireland

ISBN: 1444726048

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 6600

Whether your taste was for fiddlestix or Flavour Ravers, Trigger bars or Two and Twos, Marathons or macaroons, Peggy's Legs or Push Pops, Liquorice Allsorts or Little Devils, You'll Ruin Your Dinner has something for you. From the heyday of Cleeve's toffee to the birth of the Tayto Cheese & Onion crisp, it transports us back to the days when sweet shop windows across the country boasted tempting confectionery displays, when summer was heralded with a visit from the ice-cream cart, and when Grafton Street was the sweet shop capital of Ireland. And then there was the golden age of Irish-made sweets, when the entire nation downed tools to listen to Fry-Cadbury's soap The Kennedys of Castleross and Gay Byrne cut his teeth on The Urney Programme. The next three decades brought enduring favourites along with fleeting fads, but the craving for a sugar-rush remained steadfast for generations of Irish kids to come. These mouth-watering memories are captured here across the decades in an assortment that will keep you dipping back in for more - and it won't ruin your dinner.
Posted in History

Gubu Nation

Grotesque Unbelievable Bizarre Unprecedented Happenings in Ireland

Author: Damian Corless

Publisher: Merlin Pub

ISBN: 9781903582572

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 4761

Grotesque, Unbelievable, Bizarre, Unprecedented - GUBU was coined to describe those moments when words otherwise fail. GUBU Nation is the jaw-dropping outcome of countless hours spent rummaging down the back of posterity's sofa. The stories it tells prove time and again that truth really is stranger than fiction. Gone but not forgotten - not anymore - are the strange case of the Hare Krishnas and the drugged ice cream, the mass protests that met Ireland's first staging of Eurovision, the nuclear fallout caused by Joe Jacob TD and the brief phenomenon of Toni the Exotic Dancer There's much, much more - sixty tales of the unexpected, the vaguely familiar and the plain ludicrous.
Posted in History

Rain

A Natural and Cultural History

Author: Cynthia Barnett

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0804137102

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 2452

Rain is elemental, mysterious, precious, destructive. It is the subject of countless poems and paintings; the top of the weather report; the source of the world's water. Yet this is the first book to tell the story of rain. Cynthia Barnett's Rain begins four billion years ago with the torrents that filled the oceans, and builds to the storms of climate change. It weaves together science—the true shape of a raindrop, the mysteries of frog and fish rains—with the human story of our ambition to control rain, from ancient rain dances to the 2,203 miles of levees that attempt to straitjacket the Mississippi River. It offers a glimpse of our "founding forecaster," Thomas Jefferson, who measured every drizzle long before modern meteorology. Two centuries later, rainy skies would help inspire Morrissey’s mopes and Kurt Cobain’s grunge. Rain is also a travelogue, taking readers to Scotland to tell the surprising story of the mackintosh raincoat, and to India, where villagers extract the scent of rain from the monsoon-drenched earth and turn it into perfume. Now, after thousands of years spent praying for rain or worshiping it; burning witches at the stake to stop rain or sacrificing small children to bring it; mocking rain with irrigated agriculture and cities built in floodplains; even trying to blast rain out of the sky with mortars meant for war, humanity has finally managed to change the rain. Only not in ways we intended. As climate change upends rainfall patterns and unleashes increasingly severe storms and drought, Barnett shows rain to be a unifying force in a fractured world. Too much and not nearly enough, rain is a conversation we share, and this is a book for everyone who has ever experienced it.
Posted in Science

History of the Rain

Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2014

Author: Niall Williams

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408852012

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 7416

We are our stories. We tell them to stay alive or keep alive those who only live now in the telling. In Faha, County Clare, everyone is a long story... Bedbound in her attic room beneath the falling rain, in the margin between this world and the next, Plain Ruth Swain is in search of her father. To find him, enfolded in the mystery of ancestors, Ruthie must first trace the jutting jaw lines, narrow faces and gleamy skin of the Swains from the restless Reverend Swain, her great-grandfather, to grandfather Abraham, to her father, Virgil – via pole-vaulting, leaping salmon, poetry and the three thousand, nine hundred and fifty eight books piled high beneath the two skylights in her room, beneath the rain. The stories – of her golden twin brother Aeney, their closeness even as he slips away; of their dogged pursuit of the Swains' Impossible Standard and forever falling just short; of the wild, rain-sodden history of fourteen acres of the worst farming land in Ireland – pour forth in Ruthie's still, small, strong, hopeful voice. A celebration of books, love and the healing power of the imagination, this is an exquisite, funny, moving novel in which every sentence sings.
Posted in Fiction

Family Herald

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1162

Posted in

Follow the Old Road

Discover the Ireland of Yesteryear

Author: Jo Kerrigan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781847179111

Category:

Page: 304

View: 3592

By turning off the main highway and discovering old routes, some of which have been travelled for thousands of years, you will see Ireland in an entirely different way. Follow the Old Road will take you on a tour of a variety of pathways from great river roads to lost railways. Long before records began, travellers arriving on our shores found safe havens, natural harbours, the estuaries of rivers, and settled there, in sight of the ocean that had brought them to this land. Gradually they moved inland to more fertile soil, usually along the course of a river that provided both guidance and essential water supplies. In later centuries, great lords built their castles and monks their abbeys upriver, at the tidal limit. Some of the routes are still used today while others lie ignored and overgrown. Villages, and, later on, towns grew up around these castles and abbeys to serve their needs; towns that still prosper today.
Posted in

Ashes of Fiery Weather

A Novel

Author: Kathleen Donohoe

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0544526694

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 8901

This “stunning and intimate portrayal of four generations of New York City firefighters somehow manages to be part Alice McDermott, part Denis Leary” (Irish America). One of Book Riot’s 100 Must-Read New York City Novels Firefighters walk boldly into battle against the most capricious of elements. Their daughters, mothers, sisters, and wives walk through the world with another kind of strength and another kind of sorrow, and no one knows that better than the women of the Keegan-O’Reilly clan. Ashes of Fiery Weather takes us from famine-era Ireland to New York City a decade after 9/11, illuminating the passionate loves and tragic losses of generations of women in a firefighting family—with “characters that come so vividly to life one forgets one is reading a novel . . . Anyone Irish will face an uncanny recognition in these pages; everyone else will be enthralled meeting such captivating figures” (Matthew Thomas, New York Times–bestselling author of We Are Not Ourselves).
Posted in Fiction

Crop Reporter

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 8505

Posted in Agriculture

Rain

Four Walks in English Weather

Author: Melissa Harrison

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571328954

Category: Travel

Page: 64

View: 9075

A wonderful meditation on the English landscape in wet weather by the acclaimed novelist and nature writer, Melissa Harrison. Whenever rain falls, our countryside changes. Fields, farms, hills and hedgerows appear altered, the wildlife behaves differently, and over time the terrain itself is transformed. In Rain, Melissa Harrison explores our relationship with the weather as she follows the course of four rain showers, in four seasons, across Wicken Fen, Shropshire, the Darent Valley and Dartmoor. Blending these expeditions with reading, research, memory and imagination, she reveals how rain is not just an essential element of the world around us, but a key part of our own identity too.
Posted in Travel

The Friend

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Society of Friends

Page: N.A

View: 7186

Posted in Society of Friends

Raindrops Roll

With Audio Recording

Author: April Pulley Sayre

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1481420658

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 40

View: 3580

Discover the wonder of water in this refreshingly fun and fascinating exploration of rain, raindrops, and the water cycle from the creator of Rah, Rah, Radishes! and Go, Go Grapes! Raindrops drop. They plop. They patter. They spatter. And in the process, they make the whole world feel fresh and new and clean. In this gorgeously photo-illustrated nonfiction picture book, celebrated author April Pulley Sayre sheds new light on the wonders of rain, from the beauty of a raindrop balanced on a leaf to the amazing, never-ending water cycle that keeps our planet in perfect ecological balance.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

Bird Habitats of Great Britain and Ireland

A New Approach to Birdwatching

Author: Paul Morrison

Publisher: Michael Joseph

ISBN: 9780718131838

Category: Bird watching

Page: 256

View: 5361

Posted in Bird watching

Niles' Weekly Register

Author: Hezekiah Niles

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 6032

Posted in United States

The Grapes of Wrath

Author: John Steinbeck

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0670016918

Category: Fiction

Page: 496

View: 1044

Depicts the hardships and suffering endured by the Joads as they journey from Oklahoma to California during the Depression.
Posted in Fiction