Liberalizing Lynching

Building a New Racialized State

Author: Daniel Kato

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190232579

Category: African Americans

Page: 232

View: 7203

This study explores the relationship between the American liberal regime and the illiberal act of lynching. It explores the federal government's pattern of non-intervention regarding the lynchings of African Americans from the late 19th century to the 1960s. Although popular belief holds that the federal government was unable to address racial violence in the South, Kato argues that its actions and decisions show that federal inaction was not primarily a consequence of institutional or legal incapacities, but rather a decision supported and maintained by all three branches of the federal government.
Posted in African Americans

Bullets and Fire

Lynching and Authority in Arkansas, 1840-1950

Author: Guy Lancaster

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1610756223

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 1767

Bullets and Fire is the first collection on lynching in Arkansas, exploring all corners of the state from the time of slavery up to the mid-twentieth century and covering stories of the perpetrators, victims, and those who fought against vigilante violence. Among the topics discussed are the lynching of slaves, the Arkansas Council of the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, the 1927 lynching of John Carter in Little Rock, and the state’s long opposition to a federal anti-lynching law. Throughout, the work reveals how the phenomenon of lynching—as the means by which a system of white supremacy reified itself, with its perpetrators rarely punished and its defenders never condemned—served to construct authority in Arkansas. Bullets and Fire will add depth to the growing body of literature on American lynching and integrate a deeper understanding of this violence into Arkansas history.
Posted in Social Science

Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern U.S. History

Author: Hettie V. Williams

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440835497

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

View: 1166

Covering the history and contributions of black women intellectuals from the late 19th century to the present, this book highlights individuals who are often overlooked in the study of the American intellectual tradition. • Represents a standout volume on the subject of black women intellectuals in modern U.S. history that covers figures from the late 19th century to the present • Includes well-known individuals, such as Ida B. Wells and Toni Morrison, as well as lesser-known black women intellectuals, such as Wanda Coleman • Provides contributions from various experts in the field
Posted in Social Science

Tocqueville's Nightmare

The Administrative State Emerges in America, 1900-1940

Author: Daniel R. Ernst

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199920877

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 1892

In the 1830s, the French aristocrat Alexis de Tocqueville warned that "insufferable despotism" would prevail if America ever acquired a national administrative state. Today's Tea Partiers evidently believe that, after a great wrong turn in the early twentieth century, Tocqueville's nightmare has come true. In those years, it seems, a group of radicals, seduced by alien ideologies, created vast bureaucracies that continue to trample on individual freedom. In Tocqueville's Nightmare, Daniel R. Ernst destroys this ahistorical and simplistic narrative. He shows that, in fact, the nation's best corporate lawyers were among the creators of "commission government" that supporters were more interested in purging government of corruption than creating a socialist utopia, and that the principles of individual rights, limited government, and due process were built into the administrative state. Far from following "un-American" models, American state-builders rejected the leading European scheme for constraining government, the Rechtsstaat (a state of rules). Instead, they looked to an Anglo-American tradition that equated the rule of law with the rule of courts and counted on judges to review the bases for administrators' decisions. Soon, however, even judges realized that strict judicial review shifted to courts decisions best left to experts. The most masterful judges, including Charles Evans Hughes, Chief Justice of the United States from 1930 to 1941, ultimately decided that a "day in court" was unnecessary if individuals had already had a "day in commission" where the fundamentals of due process and fair play prevailed. This procedural notion of the rule of law not only solved the judges' puzzle of reconciling bureaucracy and freedom. It also assured lawyers that their expertise in the ways of the courts would remain valuable, and professional politicians that presidents would not use administratively distributed largess as an independent source of political power. Tocqueville's nightmare has not come to pass. Instead, the American administrative state is a restrained and elegant solution to a thorny problem, and it remains in place to this day.
Posted in Law

Vagrant Nation

Police Power, Constitutional Change, and the Making of the 1960s

Author: Risa Goluboff

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199768447

Category: Vagrancy

Page: 480

View: 7878

"In 1950s America, it was remarkably easy for police to arrest almost anyone for almost any reason. The criminal justice system-and especially the age-old law of vagrancy-played a key role not only in maintaining safety and order but also in enforcing conventional standards of morality and propriety. A person could be arrested for sporting a beard, making a speech, or working too little. Yet by the end of the 1960s, vagrancy laws were discredited and American society was fundamentally transformed. What happened? In Vagrant Nation, Risa Goluboff provides a truly groundbreaking account of this transformation. By reading the history of the 1960s through the lens of vagrancy laws, Goluboff shows how constitutional challenges to long-standing police practices were at the center of the multiple movements that made "the 1960s." Vagrancy laws were not just about poor people. They were so broad and flexible-criminalizing everything from immorality to wandering about-that they made it possible for the police to arrest anyone out of place in any way: Beats and hippies; Communists and Vietnam War protestors; racial minorities, civil rights activists, and interracial couples; prostitutes, single women, and gay men, lesbians, and other sexual minorities. As hundreds of these "vagrants" and their lawyers claimed that vagrancy laws were unconstitutional, the laws became a flashpoint for debates about radically different visions of order and freedom. In Goluboff's compelling portrayal, the legal campaign against vagrancy laws becomes a sweeping legal and social history of the 1960s. It touches on movements advocating everything from civil rights to peace to gay rights to welfare rights to cultural revolution. As Goluboff links the human stories of those arrested to the great controversies of the time, she makes coherent an era that often seems chaotic. She also powerfully demonstrates how ordinary people, with the help of lawyers and judges, can change the meaning of the Constitution. By 1972, the Supreme Court announced that vagrancy laws that had been a law enforcement staple for four hundred years were no longer constitutional. That decision, as well as the social movements and legal arguments that prompted it, has had major consequences for current debates about police power and constitutional rights. Clashes over everything from stop and frisk to homelessness to public protests echo the same tension between order and freedom that vagrancy cases tried to resolve. Since the early 1970s, courts, policymakers, activists, and ordinary citizens have had to contend with the massive legal vacuum left by vagrancy law's downfall. Battles over what, if anything, should replace vagrancy laws, like battles over the legacy of the sixties transformations themselves, are far from over"--
Posted in Vagrancy

The Birth of the New Justice

The Internationalization of Crime and Punishment, 1919-1950

Author: Mark Lewis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019966028X

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 5001

A history of the attempts to introduce international criminal courts and new international criminal laws after World War I to repress aggressive war, war crimes, terrorism, and genocide.
Posted in History

Discipline & Punish

The Birth of the Prison

Author: Michel Foucault

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307819299

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 4000

In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.
Posted in Social Science

The Roman Foundations of the Law of Nations

Alberico Gentili and the Justice of Empire

Author: Benedict Kingsbury,Benjamin Straumann

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199599874

Category: History

Page: 382

View: 1370

This book explores ways in which both the theory and the practice of international politics was built upon Roman private and public law foundations on a variety of issues including the organization and limitation of war, peace settlements, embassies, commerce, and shipping.
Posted in History

Despite the Best Intentions

How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good Schools

Author: Amanda E. Lewis,John B. Diamond

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190250879

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 5261

On the surface, Riverview High School looks like the post-racial ideal. Serving an enviably affluent, diverse, and liberal district, the school is well-funded, its teachers are well-trained, and many of its students are high-achieving. Yet Riverview has not escaped the same unrelenting question that plagues schools throughout America: why is it that even when all of the circumstances seem right, black and Latina/o students continue to lag behind their peers? Through five years' worth of interviews and data-gathering at Riverview, Amanda Lewis and John Diamond have created a powerful and illuminating study of how the racial achievement gap continues to afflict American schools more than fifty years after the formal dismantling of segregation. As students progress from elementary school to middle school to high school, their level of academic achievement increasingly tracks along racial lines, with white and Asian students maintaining higher GPAs and standardized testing scores, taking more advanced classes, and attaining better college admission results than their black and Latina/o counterparts. Most research to date has focused on the role of poverty, family stability, and other external influences in explaining poor performance at school, especially in urban contexts. Diamond and Lewis instead situate their research in a suburban school, and look at what factors within the school itself could be causing the disparity. Most crucially, they challenge many common explanations of the "racial achievement gap," exploring what race actually means in this situation, and how it matters. Diamond and Lewis' research brings clarity and data into a debate that is too often dominated by stereotyping, race-baiting, and demagoguery. An in-depth study with far-reaching consequences, Despite the Best Intentions revolutionizes our understanding of both the knotty problem of academic disparities and the larger question of the color line in American society.
Posted in Education

The liberalization of American Protestantism

a case study in complex organizations

Author: Henry J. Pratt

Publisher: Wayne State Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 303

View: 2221

Posted in Religion

The Book of the Damned

Author: Charles Fort

Publisher: Baen Publishing Enterprises

ISBN: 1625792719

Category: Fiction

Page: 194

View: 7494

Features an introductory essay by Jack WomackLo! Welcome to the worlds of Charles Fort, chronicler of the odd, the weird, the strange, the unexpected, and the inexplicable. In words at times as beautiful as anything ever written in English, Fort reveals the marvels of an age, questions the nature of what we think we know for certain, and provides the reader with leads on how not to be fooled by shaggy dog stories. Here youll find rains of the unexpected, fish, snakes, and other items from the _super-Sargasso seaÓ of the unexplained that circles the Earth. Here are accounts of UFOs, accounts of odd animals seen at sea or on land, mysterious attacks by what appear to have been animals, mysterious appearances of things and people in places they could not be. Here Forts epic account of spontaneous combustion, lights in the sky, poltergeists, unseen. murderous wild animals, mysterious disappearances, manifestations of psychotic mania, speaking in tongues¾and, of course, the cow that gave birth to two lambs. All of this Fortean wonder is prefaced by a magnificent new introductory essay by Jack Womack, winner of the Philip K. Dick Award and lifetime Fortean. This Ebook is part of the Baen Books Charles Fort Ebook Collection At the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management).
Posted in Fiction

The Loyal West

Civil War and Reunion in Middle America

Author: Matthew E. Stanley

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252099176

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 3531

A free region deeply influenced by southern mores, the Lower Middle West represented a true cultural and political median in Civil War-era America. Here grew a Unionism steeped in the mythology of the Loyal West--a myth rooted in regional and racial animosities and the belief that westerners had won the war. Matthew E. Stanley's intimate study explores the Civil War, Reconstruction, and sectional reunion in this bellwether region. Using the lives of area soldiers and officers as a lens, Stanley reveals a place and a strain of collective memory that was anti-rebel, anti-eastern, and anti-black in its attitudes--one that came to be at the forefront of the northern retreat from Reconstruction and toward white reunion. The Lower Middle West's embrace of black exclusion laws, origination of the Copperhead movement, backlash against liberalizing war measures, and rejection of Reconstruction were all pivotal to broader American politics. And the region's legacies of white supremacy--from racialized labor violence to sundown towns to lynching--found malignant expression nationwide, intersecting with how Loyal Westerners remembered the war.
Posted in History

Six Days Or Forever?

Tennessee V. John Thomas Scopes

Author: Ray Ginger

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195197846

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 8906

The drama and historical significance of the Scopes case are given equal attention in this account of the Tennessee trial. Bibliogs
Posted in History

The Wyoming State Constitution

Author: Robert B. Keiter,Tim Newcomb

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 019977904X

Category: Law

Page: 326

View: 3292

In The Wyoming State Constitution, Robert B. Keiter and Tim Newcomb provide a comprehensive guide to Wyoming's colorful constitutional history. The Wyoming State Constitution provides an outstanding analysis of the state's governing charter, including an in-depth, section-by-section analysis of the entire constitution, detailing important changes that have been made since its initial drafting. This treatment, which includes a list of cases, index, and bibliography, makes this guide indispensable for students, scholars, and practitioners of Wyoming's constitution. Previously published by Greenwood, this title has been brought back in to circulation by Oxford University Press with new verve. Re-printed with standardization of content organization in order to facilitate research across the series, this title, as with all titles in the series, is set to join the dynamic revision cycle of The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States. The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States is an important series that reflects a renewed international interest in constitutional history and provides expert insight into each of the 50 state constitutions. Each volume in this innovative series contains a historical overview of the state's constitutional development, a section-by-section analysis of its current constitution, and a comprehensive guide to further research. Under the expert editorship of Professor G. Alan Tarr, Director of the Center on State Constitutional Studies at Rutgers University, this series provides essential reference tools for understanding state constitutional law. Books in the series can be purchased individually or as part of a complete set, giving readers unmatched access to these important political documents.
Posted in Law

Economic Liberalization and Political Violence

Utopia Or Dystopia?

Author: Francisco Gutiérrez

Publisher: IDRC

ISBN: 0745330630

Category: Political Science

Page: 355

View: 3763

A study of workers struggles against management regimes in Britain's car industry from the Second World War to the late 1980s.
Posted in Political Science

Ballot Battles

The History of Disputed Elections in the United States

Author: Edward Foley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190235276

Category: Election monitoring

Page: 496

View: 1631

"The 2000 presidential election, with its problems in Florida, was not the first major vote-counting controversy in the nation's history--nor the last. Ballot Battles traces the evolution of America's experience with these disputes, from 1776 to now, explaining why they have proved persistently troublesome and offering an institutional solution"--
Posted in Election monitoring

From Jim Crow to Civil Rights

The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality

Author: Michael J. Klarman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195310187

Category: Law

Page: 655

View: 4486

While Brown vs. Board of Education had a significant impact by bringing race issues to public attention and mobilizing supporters of the ruling, it also energized the opposition. In this account of the history of constitutional law concerning race, legal scholar Michael Klarman details the ways in which Supreme Court decisions have had consequences for race relations in America.--From publisher description
Posted in Law

The Obama Diaries

Author: Laura Ingraham

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439198445

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 7853

The Diary of President Barack Obama The White House May 19, 2010 I was going to write about tonight’s state dinner for Mexico and the amnesty plan, but we’ve got a national crisis here! I think somebody’s been snooping in this diary! The pages are all wrinkled! And the most personal entries are dog-eared! WHAT THE HELL’S GOING ON HERE? (WASHINGTON, D.C.) On May 20, 2010, Laura Ingraham received a package from an anonymous source that will change the history of the United States and the legacy of President Barack Obama. While retrieving her automobile from the underground garage at the Watergate complex (where she had just enjoyed her weekly pedicure), Ingraham discovered a manila envelope on the hood of her car. When she picked it up, a deep baritone voice called out from a nearby stairwell: "Just read it. You’ll know what to do." The shadowy figure then disappeared into the darkness without another word. The envelope contained copies of what appeared to be diary entries written by President Barack Obama, his family, and high-ranking administration officials. Because the "diaries" are so revealing, Ingraham felt compelled to release them to the American public and the citizens of the world. Major media outlets love to describe the president as "no drama Obama," but The Obama Diaries tells a different tale. Through these "diary entries," readers will see past the carefully constructed Obama façade to the administration’s true plans to "remake America." In The Obama Diaries, Ingraham hilariously skewers the president and his minions. She takes aim at: •the cynical "razzle-dazzle" marketing of Obama’s radical agenda •the use of the Obama "brand" and family to obscure Obama’s true aims •Michelle Obama’s gardening and anti-obesity initiative; and much more. Informative and hugely entertaining, The Obama Diaries will inspire both laughter and critical thinking about the future of the nation and the man currently at the helm. •the use of the Obama "brand" and family to obscure Obama’s true aims •Michelle Obama’s gardening and anti-obesity initiative; and much more. Informative and hugely entertaining, The Obama Diaries will inspire both laughter and critical thinking about the future of the nation and the man currently at the helm. Excerpts from Laura Ingraham’s The Obama Diaries Obama on Sarah Palin: "Hell, doesn’t Palin have anything better to do than criticize me? Shouldn’t she be back home shooting some endangered wolf species from a helicopter?" (April 9, 2010) Michelle on being First Lady: "I’ll be damned if all this fabulosity is going to go to waste reading Dr. Seuss to snot-nosed kids all day." (January 23, 2009) Vice President Joe Biden on Michelle Obama: "She’s kind of like a black Hillary Clinton. I mean that in a good way." (May 5, 2009) Obama on his visit to the Vatican: "If I can ingratiate myself with a few more of these red-hats, the pope thing might not be a bad follow-up to the presidency." (July 10, 2009)
Posted in Political Science

The Opening of American Law

Neoclassical Legal Thought, 1870-1970

Author: Herbert Hovenkamp

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199331308

Category: Law

Page: 460

View: 1023

Two late Victorian ideas disrupted American legal thought: the Darwinian theory of evolution and marginalist economics. The legal thought that emerged can be called 'neoclassical', because it embodied ideas that were radically new while retaining many elements of what had gone before. Although Darwinian social science was developed earlier, in most legal disciplines outside of criminal law and race theory marginalist approaches came to dominate. This book carries these themes through a variety of legal subjects in both public and private law.
Posted in Law

Perfect Victims

Slaughter, Sensation and Serial Killers: An American Criminal Odyssey

Author: Bill James

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0857203924

Category: True Crime

Page: 496

View: 5319

The Black Dahlia case. The Manson murders. The Zodiac Killer. The slaughter of JonBenet Ramsay. These killings, among many others in Bill James's astonishing chronicle of the history of American crime, have all created a frenzy of interest and speculation about human nature. And while many of us choose to avoid the news about gruesome murders, Bill James contends that these crime stories, which create such frenzy (and have throughout history), are as important to understanding our society, culture and history as anything we may consider to be a more 'serious' subject. The topic envelopes our society so completely, we almost forget about it. James looks at the ways in which society has changed by examining the development of how crimes have been committed, investigated and prosecuted. The booktakes on such issues as the rise of an organized police force, the controversial use of the death penalty, the introduction of evidence such as fingerprinting and DNA, and the unexpected ways in which the most shocking crimes have shaped the criminal justice system and our perceptions of violence.
Posted in True Crime